Search results

1 – 10 of 25
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

E.G. Sieverts, J. Figdor, S. Bakker and M. Hofstede

In this series, specifications, properties and test results of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are listed and compared. This article is…

Abstract

In this series, specifications, properties and test results of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are listed and compared. This article is devoted to the previously defined category of end‐user software, sometimes also referred to as bibliographic formatting software. Eight different programs have been tested and assessed: Archivist, BIB/Search, Library Master, Notebook II, Papyrus, Pro‐Cite, The Ref‐Filer and Reference Manager. All programs run under MS‐DOS, though there are also Apple Macintosh versions for Pro‐Cite and Reference Manager. For each of the eight programs about 100 facts and test results are tabulated. All the programs are individually discussed as well.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Eric G. Sieverts and Marten Hofstede

In this first article of a series, several categories of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are distinguished and characterised: (1) classical…

Abstract

In this first article of a series, several categories of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are distinguished and characterised: (1) classical retrieval systems, (2) end‐user software, (3) indexing programs, (4) full‐text retrieval programs, and (5) personal information managers. In addition, the special retrieval techniques of hypertext and best‐match searching are discussed. The 20‐odd programs which will be assessed in subsequent articles are characterised according to these categories. As an introduction to the coming comparison and assessment, a systematic listing and discussion of properties and functions of ISR software is presented.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Eric G. Sieverts and Marten Hofstede

The more than 3700 data presented in the tables of preceding articles in this series, pertaining to 37 different software packages for information storage and retrieval…

Abstract

The more than 3700 data presented in the tables of preceding articles in this series, pertaining to 37 different software packages for information storage and retrieval (ISR), may seem overwhelming to the reader who needs to make a well‐founded choice. To make this task easier, some general questions can be asked with respect to the required ISR application. These questions can be summarised as: What sort of information? How much? For whom? For what purpose? At what cost? The discussion about user needs, typical applications and lists of demands centres around these five basic questions in relation to the categories of retrieval software which were identified in the six earlier articles. They cover the whole range from bibliographic software to advanced full‐text retrieval software.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Alison Verbeck and MaryEllen Sievert

A comparison of the indexing on Eric and Lisa of the three journals devoted to online searching, Online, Online Review and Database, revealed some differences, but a…

Abstract

A comparison of the indexing on Eric and Lisa of the three journals devoted to online searching, Online, Online Review and Database, revealed some differences, but a greater number of similarities. On average, Lisa assigned more terms/document but Eric indexed more concepts/document. A critical subset of the vocabulary which distinguished online searching (a small number of terms used frequently) did emerge for each, but there were no exact matches in the terminology of the two systems. Several words within the multi‐ word phrases, however, were the same. For both systems, at least one term from the critical subset had been assigned to more than half the articles in the sample. Further, in each system, a single term had been assigned to more than eighty percent of the sample.

Details

Online Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Paul Nieuwenhuysen

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used…

Abstract

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used in online information and documentation work. They fall into the following categories:

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

E.G. Sieverts, M. Hofstede, G. Lobbestael, B. Oude Groeniger, F. Provost and P. Šikovà

In this article, the fifth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of seven programs are presented and various properties…

Abstract

In this article, the fifth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of seven programs are presented and various properties and qualities of these programs are discussed. In this instalment of the series we discuss programs for information storage and retrieval which are primarily characterised by the properties of personal information managers (PIMs), hypertext programs, or best match and ranking retrieval systems. The programs reviewed in this issue are the personal information managers 3by5/RediReference, askSam, Dayflo Tracker, and Ize; Personal Librarian uses best match and ranking; the hypertext programs are Folio Views and the HyperKRS/HyperCard combination (askSam, Ize and Personal Librarian boast hypertext features as well). HyperKRS/HyperCard is only available for the Apple Macintosh. All other programs run under MS‐DOS; versions of Personal Librarian also run under Windows and some other systems. For each of the seven programs about 100 facts and test results are tabulated. The programs are also discussed individually.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

MaryEllen Sievert and Bert R. Boyce

The traditional role of the controlled vocabulary has been to bring together items scattered by a multiplicity of natural language terms. Therefore, it was considered a…

Abstract

The traditional role of the controlled vocabulary has been to bring together items scattered by a multiplicity of natural language terms. Therefore, it was considered a recall device. The file structure of current online structure systems now leads to the use of such vocabularies as a precision device. Because of the levels of specificity in the controlled vocabulary, the search for broader concepts means several terms may be ncessary. In this case, the file structure of the retrieval systems requires that for efficient searching the entry points be analyzed and minimized. Complete, rather than partial, entry of controlled terms appears to be inefficient.

Details

Online Review, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

E.G. Sieverts, M. Hofstede, A. Nieuwland, C. Groeneveld and B. de Zwart

In this article, the sixth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of nine programs are presented and various properties…

Abstract

In this article, the sixth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of nine programs are presented and various properties and qualities of these programs are discussed. We discuss additional programs for information storage and retrieval and for text retrieval from several of the various categories which have been looked at in previous instalments. One new (secondary) type of 1SR software is defined as administrative software. The programs reviewed in this issue are BRS‐Search, dtSearch, InfoBank, Micro‐OPC, Q&A, STN‐PFS, Strix, TINman and ZYindex. All but dtSearch and ZYindex can be regarded as primarily classical retrieval packages; Q&A boasts comprehensive administrative features as well; dtSearch and ZYindex are indexing programs. For ZYindex a new Windows version has been tested. All other programs run under MS‐DOS. For each of the nine programs about 100 facts and test results are tabulated. All the programs are individually discussed as well.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

E.G. Sieverts, M. Hofstede and B. Oude Groeniger

In this article, the fourth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of six indexing and full‐text retrieval programs are…

Abstract

In this article, the fourth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of six indexing and full‐text retrieval programs are presented and various properties and qualities of these programs are discussed. The common feature of programs in these categories is that they are primarily meant to retrieve words (or combinations of them) in large text files. To do this they either simply index existing text files in one or more formats (indexing programs), or they store and index them in their own database format (full‐text retrieval programs). The programs reviewed in this issue are the indexing programs Ask‐It, Texplore and ZYindex and the full‐text retrieval programs KAware, TextMaster and WordCruncher. All programs run under MS‐DOS. In addition ZYindex has a Windows and a Unix version and TextMaster is also available for Unix. For each of the six programs almost 100 facts and test results are tabulated. The programs are also discussed individually.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

George Válas

Until recently there were very few publications dealing with comparison of different CDROM information retrieval software packages (Richards & Robinson 1993). The few…

Abstract

Until recently there were very few publications dealing with comparison of different CDROM information retrieval software packages (Richards & Robinson 1993). The few exceptions (e.g. Harry & Oppenheim 1993; Jacsó 1991; McFaul 1992; Tian‐Zhu 1991; Zink 1991) mostly deal only with the principles of such comparisons, not with actual comparisons, and mostly only with user interfaces, not with the software as a whole. They usually give collections of rules — how to rank the CDROM publications, how to give ‘award marks’ to them — but this usually characterises CDROM publications and databases, not the software itself. Moreover, the performance factors, the properties most important for professional searchers, are usually completely missing from these collections of rules.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

1 – 10 of 25