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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Yang Ji, Erhua Zhou and Wenbo Guo

Anchored in the role of a social arbiter, the purpose of this study is to examine whether and how media coverage has an impact on CEO overconfidence and further explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Anchored in the role of a social arbiter, the purpose of this study is to examine whether and how media coverage has an impact on CEO overconfidence and further explore how media ownership and Confucianism affect the relationship in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 1,492 Chinese listed companies from 2010 to 2015, the study adopts random effects models to empirically analyze the effect of media coverage on CEO overconfidence and the roles of media ownership and Confucianism.

Findings

The paper finds that media coverage is significantly and positively associated with CEO overconfidence, and the positive relationship between media coverage and CEO overconfidence becomes stronger for state-controlled media. What is more, the influence of media coverage on CEO overconfidence is attenuated for those firms located in stronger Confucianism atmosphere. A further analysis reveals that different tenors of media coverage yield asymmetric effects.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new and solid support for the argument that media praise stimulates CEO overconfidence and increases the knowledge about under what conditions CEO overconfidence varies, broadly speaking which fosters the development of upper echelons theory (UET). Meanwhile, the results extend the literature on media effect and information processing. The findings are also beneficial to improve corporate decisions and government regulation on Chinese media systems.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2013

Xiaoyan Li and Erhua Zhou

To discover new explanatory variables for employee turnover in call centres, this study seeks to examine the impact of customer verbal aggression on employee turnover…

Abstract

Purpose

To discover new explanatory variables for employee turnover in call centres, this study seeks to examine the impact of customer verbal aggression on employee turnover intention and the mediating role of employees' emotional exhaustion. Furthermore, it aims to analyse the moderating effect created by perceived organisational support (POS) in a team climate on the relationship between customer verbal aggression and employees' emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a deductive logic approach to develop hypotheses and analytical frameworks. Interviews and questionnaires were employed to collect data from two call centres, 81 units, and 1,112 employees in China. Finally, the data were analysed and the hypotheses were tested via descriptive analysis and hierarchical linear modeling analysis using SPSS and HLM, respectively.

Findings

First it was found that customer verbal aggression significantly predicted employee turnover intention. Second, that employees' emotional exhaustion fully mediated the relationship between customer verbal aggression and employee turnover intention. Third, the correlation between customer verbal aggression and employee emotional exhaustion was found to be weaker for teams with higher levels of emotional POS, but not weaker for those with higher levels of instrumental POS.

Practical implications

These results suggest that service‐oriented enterprises (such as call centres) should consider employee turnover intention from the perspective of customer behaviour and improve the climate of organisational support to more efficiently reduce employee turnover.

Originality/value

Previous studies on workplace behaviours in call centres focused on customer relationship management. However, research concerning employee emotions during customer interactions is lacking. This study examined the influence of customer verbal aggression on the emotional exhaustion of call centre employees and the resultant turnover intention stemming from the conservation of resources theory. The results extend the Price–Mueller turnover model and explain how a team climate of organisational support can affect employee emotions..

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