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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Wei‐Tsong Wang and Hui‐Min Li

The purpose of this study is to develop and validate empirically a research model that depicts the relationships between the identified key value proposition attributes of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and validate empirically a research model that depicts the relationships between the identified key value proposition attributes of mobile value‐added services and the core factors of brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data collected from 497 mobile value‐added service consumers were examined using structural equation modeling to validate the research model.

Findings

The results indicate that the mobile service attributes of personalization, identifiability, and perceived enjoyment have significant positive influences on the key brand equity factors, including brand loyalty, perceived quality, brand awareness, and brand associations. Additionally, the results confirm the significance of all four of the brand equity factors in interpreting consumer purchase intention in the context of mobile value‐added service consumption.

Practical implications

The research results provide insights into how mobile value‐added services may be better designed and delivered to enhance brand equity and, in turn, profits.

Originality/value

While the market potential of mobile value‐added services and the importance of brand equity have both been widely recognized, the development and empirical validation of a model that specifically depicts the determinants of mobile value‐added service consumption from a brand‐equity perspective has not yet been undertaken. Consequently, this study investigates the relationships among key m‐commerce attributes, core brand‐equity components, and consumer behaviors. The research results have extended the application and advanced the understanding of previous mobile‐commerce and brand‐equity theories in the context of mobile value‐added service consumption.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Jing Zhang, Yanxin Jiang, Rizwan Shabbir and Miao Zhu

The paper aims to explore how brand orientation impacts brand equity via internal branding, presented brand, word-of-mouth and customer experience from stakeholder…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore how brand orientation impacts brand equity via internal branding, presented brand, word-of-mouth and customer experience from stakeholder interaction perspective in industrial services context. Brand orientation has emerged as an attractive business philosophy for industrial service companies who believe that brand plays an influential role in delivering customer value and improving firm’s performance. However, the impact of brand orientation upon brand equity is not clear yet, and the active roles of multiple stakeholders in co-creating brand equity are largely neglected in business-to-business (B2B) branding literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted among 258 pairs of firms located in mainland China. A total of nine research hypotheses related to how brand orientation impacts B2B service brand equity were examined by structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The research findings indicate: a company with high level of brand orientation will both actively communicate its brand to customers and implement internal branding among employees; internal branding enhances willingness and skills of service employees so that they can provide customers with excellent service experience, which will lead to positive word-of-mouth; effective brand communication, pleasant customer experience and favorable word-of-mouth can result in positive brand association in the mind of customers and finally build up corporate brand equity.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of this paper is that some other potential stakeholders and additional interactive processes among organization, employees and customers, which have potential to impact brand equity, are not included in the model.

Originality/value

This study makes theoretical contribution by addressing the gaps in the branding literature with respect to industrial services context and stakeholder interaction perspective. It also provides practical implications for B2B service firms as to how to develop a strong brand by implementing brand orientation within the network of core stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Christopher John Hunt, John Staunton and Keitha Dunstan

Within the new public management (NPM) context, this paper aims to examine the inclusion of equity issues in pricing policy development and implementation in the water…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the new public management (NPM) context, this paper aims to examine the inclusion of equity issues in pricing policy development and implementation in the water industry in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of literature relevant to the pricing of water shows equity issues have four dimensions which tend to be, at best, only implicitly considered. An empirical illustration employing a transaction cost framework is provided of a case in which change in pricing mechanisms was strongly suggested.

Findings

An equity paradox emerges as an explanation of why 63.7 per cent of Queensland urban water entities chose not to adopt the user-pays pricing mechanism for water. This suggests that the balance between “equity” and “efficiency” continues to be required in policy development for water pricing. Equity of access and that of distribution continue to be significant factors. As well, equity of interest and of return must be considered, especially under a user-pays pricing mechanism.

Practical implications

In respect of NPM considerations, it is argued that consideration of the four dimensions of equity in the implementation of a water pricing policy will resolve contradictions with, and paradoxes met in dealing with efficiency.

Originality/value

The argument used in the paper is interdisciplinary. References and terms used include those which are social, economic, and environmental from an accounting and management perspective.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2017

Sreekanth V.K. and Ram Babu Roy

The purpose of this paper is to apply agent-based modeling and simulation concepts in evaluating different approaches to solve ambulance-dispatching decision problems…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply agent-based modeling and simulation concepts in evaluating different approaches to solve ambulance-dispatching decision problems under bounded rationality. The paper investigates the effect of over-responding, i.e. dispatching ambulances even for doubtful high-risk patients, on the performance of equity constrained emergency medical services.

Design/methodology/approach

Agent-based modeling and simulation was used to evaluate two different dispatching policies: first, a policy based on maximum reward, and second, a policy based on the Markov decision process formulation. Four equity constraints were used: two from the patients’ side and two from the providers’ side.

Findings

The Markov decision process formulation, solved using value iteration method, performed better than the maximum reward method in terms of number of patients served. As the equity constraints conflict with each other, at most three equity constraints could be enforced at a time. The study revealed that it is safe to over-respond if there is uncertainty in the risk level of the patients.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required to understand the implications of under-responding, where doubtful high-risk patients are denied an ambulance service.

Practical implications

The need for good triage system is apparent as over-responding badly affects the operational budget. The model can be used for evaluating various dispatching policy decisions.

Social implications

Emergency medical services have to ensure efficient and equitable provision of services, from the perception of both patients and service providers.

Originality/value

The paper applies agent-based modeling to equity constrained emergency medical services and highlights findings that are not reported in the existing literature.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

V. Kumar, Ankit Anand and Nandini Nim

Traditionally, firms have been dependent on internal sources such as their own employees – and up to a certain extent, on some external sources, their customers – for…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, firms have been dependent on internal sources such as their own employees – and up to a certain extent, on some external sources, their customers – for innovation. However, in the current scenario of technological dynamism, firms are exploring multiple sources to generate ideas for innovation. Therefore, there is a need to understand the relative effect of various sources of innovations on a firm’s performance.

Methodology/approach

We offer a conceptual framework where we identify six distinct sources of innovations – firm, customers, external network, competition, macro-environment, and technology and how they create value for focal firms especially their brand equity. We introduce a taxonomy of various costs and benefits related to innovations. We then argue using our proposed taxonomy to understand the relative strengths of various sources of innovation affecting a firm’s brand equity.

Findings

We discuss and compare the relative effects of these sources of innovations on a firm’s brand equity by rank-ordering the sources. The customers and the technology as a source of innovation have the maximum impact on the firm’s brand equity followed by the marginal impact of macro-environment and external network of a firm. The firm itself has a moderate impact on its brand equity, while competition has the minimal impact. Further, we also discuss how the relationship is moderated by different innovation characteristics (nature and type of innovations).

Practical implications

The main practical implication is to create awareness among managers about various costs and benefits of the proposed six sources of innovations and their effects on brand equity. Managers would be able to prioritize their sources of innovation based on firms’ current needs, and whether to focus on lower costs or building higher brand equity in the scarce resource environment.

Originality/value

We offer a comprehensive list of six sources of innovation, build a conceptual framework wherein we discuss the relative strengths of these sources affecting brand equity.

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Tulay Girard and Musa Pinar

This study aims to use a holistic approach to empirically examine the direct and indirect relationships of both core and supporting consumer-based brand equity (CBBE…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to use a holistic approach to empirically examine the direct and indirect relationships of both core and supporting consumer-based brand equity (CBBE) dimensions from students’ perspectives and the underlying impact they have on building a robust university brand equity. It also tests whether student perceptions of the importance of the brand equity constructs significantly differ based on demographics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts the core and supporting university brand equity dimensions that have been tested for reliability and validity in prior research. Data were collected at a major university in the USA. The study used judgment sampling to carefully select a targeted sample of various colleges and class levels. A total of 439 useable surveys were collected.

Findings

The results of partial least squares–structural equation modeling reveal significant relationships between both core and supporting brand equity dimensions. The core brand equity dimensions include brand awareness, perceived quality, brand association, brand trust, learning environment, emotional environment, university reputation and brand loyalty. The supporting brand equity dimensions include library services, dining services, residence hall and physical facilities. Significant direct and/or indirect relationships were found between the core and supporting CBBE dimensions. The demographic variables of gender, semester standing and living arrangement also influence the importance of some of the core and supporting dimensions.

Practical implications

The results suggest that females, freshman and students living on-campus require specific attention in higher education. For a better representation and understanding of the university student population, we recommend that future studies use probability sampling and multiple universities for cross-validation.

Originality/value

Using the brand ecosystem framework, this is the first comprehensive study testing the relationships between both core and supporting CBBE dimensions in higher education. The study offers valuable insights to university stakeholders for building a strong university brand. It also confirms that the measures of the CBBE brand equity dimensions are valid and are applicable to other higher education institutions.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Narumon Kimpakorn and Gerard Tocquer

The aims of this article are to measure the brand equity of service firms (luxury hotels) using a customer perspective, to identify factors that predict customers’ brands…

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this article are to measure the brand equity of service firms (luxury hotels) using a customer perspective, to identify factors that predict customers’ brands relationships and to explore the links between service brand equity and employee brand commitment

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys were conducted to achieve the research objectives. The first survey objective was to measure brand equity using a sample of 250 international customers of five‐star hotels in Bangkok. The second survey objective was to collect information regarding employee brand commitment in each selected hotel using a sample of 250 employees.

Findings

Results show that hotels belonging to the same category have different brand equity and that brand differentiation and brand trust are the variables that have the major influence on customer brand relationships. Perceived service quality and associations related to hotel core services are not related to brand relationships. High hotel brands equity have a stronger level of employee brand commitment that low hotel brands equity.

Research limitations/implications

For hotel managers the research findings illustrate the importance of brand differentiation and trust for international hotels chains and illustrate the importance of employee brand commitment in the process of building a strong band. Therefore this research has an implication not only for marketing but also for human resource managers and for hotel general managers.

Originality/value

The value of this research resides in the exploration between service brand equity and employee brand commitment. The literature on service marketing emphasizes the link between employee and service quality but to the authors' knowledge little research has explored the link between the service brand and its employees.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Galina Biedenbach, Peter Hultén and Veronika Tarnovskaya

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of human capital and relational trust on business-to-business (B2B) brand equity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of human capital and relational trust on business-to-business (B2B) brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was conducted among the clients of one of the Big Four auditing firms in Sweden. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized effects.

Findings

The results demonstrate positive effects of human capital and relational trust on the core dimensions of brand equity. In the context of the professional services, human capital was found to have a stronger direct impact than relational trust on brand associations, perceived quality and brand loyalty.

Practical implications

The study provides practical recommendations for marketing managers on how to consider the nature of B2B brand equity and its determinants in developing successful branding strategies. The findings indicate that although relational trust has a positive impact on brand equity, it draws on the clients’ positive perceptions of the service providers’ human capital. Thus, investments that generate positive perceptions of a service provider’s human capital will strengthen its competitive position. Leading to the creation of relational trust and having a strong impact on the dimensions of brand equity, human capital is a strategic asset that needs careful management.

Originality/value

The study advances extant knowledge on B2B brand equity by examining contextual conditions and factors that are critical for building strong brands in industrial markets. The study demonstrates that clients’ perceptions about the knowledge, skills and abilities of service providers are more important than relational trust for enhancing B2B brand equity.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Hardeep Chahal and Madhu Bala

The purpose of the study is to examine three significant components of service brand equity – i.e. perceived service quality, brand loyalty, and brand image – and analyze…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine three significant components of service brand equity – i.e. perceived service quality, brand loyalty, and brand image – and analyze relationships among the components of brand equity and also their relationship with brand equity, which is still to be theorized and developed in the healthcare literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Effective responses were received from 206 respondents, selected conveniently from the localities of Jammu city. After scale item analysis, the data were analyzed using factor analysis, correlations, t‐tests, multiple regression analysis and path modeling using SEM.

Findings

The findings of the study support that service brand equity in the healthcare sector is greatly influenced by brand loyalty and perceived quality. However, brand image has an indirect effect on service brand equity through brand loyalty (mediating variable).

Research limitations/implications

The research can be criticized on the ground that data were selected conveniently from respondents residing in the city of Jammu, India. But at the same time the respondents were appropriate for the study as they have adequate knowledge about the hospitals, and were associated with the selected hospital for more than four years. Furthermore, the validity and reliability of the data are strong enough to take care of the limitations of the convenience sampling selection method.

Originality/value

The study has unique value addition to the service marketing vis‐à‐vis healthcare literature, from both theoretical and managerial perspectives. The study establishes a direct and significant relationship between service brand equity and its two components, i.e. perceived service quality and brand loyalty in the healthcare sector. It also provides directions to healthcare service providers in creating, enhancing, and maintaining service brand equity through service quality and brand loyalty, to sustain competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Raja Ambedkar Ande, Angappa Gunasekaran, Punniyamoorthy Murugesan and Thamaraiselvan Natarajan

Brand resonance will significantly improve the profits of the services industry in the twenty-first century. The purpose of this paper is to find the resonance score for…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand resonance will significantly improve the profits of the services industry in the twenty-first century. The purpose of this paper is to find the resonance score for modified customer-based brand equity (CBBE) model in mutual fund financial services and improve the conceptualization of customer-based mutual fund services’ brand equity through brand resonance.

Design/methodology/approach

The path values of SEM model was used to estimate the relative weights of criteria and sub-criteria in analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model and it was empirically tested with a sample of 240 mutual fund investors.

Findings

The brand resonance using AHP has been quantified. The resonance quantification of each brand has been demonstrated using two renowned Indian mutual fund services brands State Bank of India and Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.

Research limitations/implications

The interdependency of the factors which influence the resonance score is not explored.

Practical implications

Research findings provide useful guidelines for fund managers/analysts of mutual fund services companies while improving the brand equity and strong brand’s resonance with investors.

Originality/value

The paper examines quantification of resonance for modified CBBE model in mutual fund services using data from a sample of investors in India with two mutual fund brands. The AHP structure model helps firms effectively quantify the resonance score.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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