Search results

1 – 10 of over 24000
To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Irina Farquhar and Alan Sorkin

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized…

Abstract

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized innovative information technology open architecture design and integrating Radio Frequency Identification Device data technologies and real-time optimization and control mechanisms as the critical technology components of the solution. The innovative information technology, which pursues the focused logistics, will be deployed in 36 months at the estimated cost of $568 million in constant dollars. We estimate that the Systems, Applications, Products (SAP)-based enterprise integration solution that the Army currently pursues will cost another $1.5 billion through the year 2014; however, it is unlikely to deliver the intended technical capabilities.

Details

The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Maryam Mani, Seyed Mehdi Hosseini and Aldrin Abdullah

The goal of this study is to investigate the importance of safety issues in playgrounds, related to type of equipment and undersurface and their potential impacts on…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to investigate the importance of safety issues in playgrounds, related to type of equipment and undersurface and their potential impacts on property values.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of this study was drawn from neighborhood residents in Taman Sri Nibong Park, one of the biggest neighborhood parks in Penang, Malaysia. A total of 173 questionnaires related to playground injuries were distributed and collected. The data were analyzed through the use of descriptive statistics.

Findings

Drawing from the experiences of children with playground injuries, the present study concludes that more effort should be taken to establish particular qualities in designing playgrounds to attract more visitors and investors. Most playground‐related injuries are related to swings (50 percent) followed by slides (22.2 percent). Moreover, the findings revealed that 41.2 percent of injuries identified by parents occurred on sand, which is used as the undersurface of playgrounds. Swings, climbing frames, slides and monkey bars are the types of equipment that attract more children or, in other words, are the instruments found in most ordinary playgrounds that cause the most casualties. Therefore, particular attention needs to be given to ensure safety in designing the parks.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in its scope due to the lack of time and budget. Moreover, it focused only on one playground and therefore it cannot be generalized. Hence, further research about safety issues in playgrounds is needed to allow a better understanding. In addition, more studies are needed to explore how new equipment designs should be incorporated to ensure safe playgrounds, which in turn can increase property values.

Practical implications

This research would enable government, the private sector and equipment designers, as well as society in general, to benefit from new approaches in considering the effects of the safety of equipment in playgrounds and its important effects on playgrounds, which could be a key determinant of property value. It can affect development strategies by attracting more investment in equipment safety design. This new way of thinking can also affect the quality of life of society and its sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new way of thinking about the effects of playgrounds on property values by looking strategically at safety aspects in playgrounds.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Zainab Riaz, David J. Edwards, Gary D. Holt and Tony Thorpe

Construction plant and equipment accident statistics suggest constant re‐evaluation of health and safety (H&S) systems is beneficial. This paper aims to process analyse…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction plant and equipment accident statistics suggest constant re‐evaluation of health and safety (H&S) systems is beneficial. This paper aims to process analyse plant and equipment H&S management systems on UK construction sites, with a view to applying information and communication technology (ICT) to them as an improvement mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

Five construction project case studies drawn from members of the former Major Contractors Group yield rich H&S process data. These are analysed using data flow diagram (DFD) techniques, to evaluate processes and proffer system improvements incorporating ICT.

Findings

Causes of unsafe practice regarding management of construction plant and equipment are found to include: aspects of the plant itself, management processes and operator competence. A new ICT “process paradigm” is suggested, the architecture of which incorporates mobile computing, automatic identification and data collection and a management information system.

Research limitations/implications

Findings contribute particularly to the fields of plant and equipment; and managing H&S.

Practical implications

Suggested ICT direction might form the basis of commercial interest in developing an all‐embracing H&S control mechanism for plant and equipment operations.

Originality/value

Application of DFD analysis in this setting is quite new.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2018

Ruwini Edirisinghe

The future construction site will be pervasive, context aware and embedded with intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to explore and define the concept of the digital…

Abstract

Purpose

The future construction site will be pervasive, context aware and embedded with intelligence. The purpose of this paper is to explore and define the concept of the digital skin of the future smart construction site.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a systematic and hierarchical classification of 114 articles from both industry and academia on the digital skin concept and evaluates them. The hierarchical classification is based on application areas relevant to construction, such as augmented reality, building information model-based visualisation, labour tracking, supply chain tracking, safety management, mobile equipment tracking and schedule and progress monitoring. Evaluations of the research papers were conducted based on three pillars: validation of technological feasibility, onsite application and user acceptance testing.

Findings

Technologies learned about in the literature review enabled the envisaging of the pervasive construction site of the future. The paper presents scenarios for the future context-aware construction site, including the construction worker, construction procurement management and future real-time safety management systems.

Originality/value

Based on the gaps identified by the review in the body of knowledge and on a broader analysis of technology diffusion, the paper highlights the research challenges to be overcome in the advent of digital skin. The paper recommends that researchers follow a coherent process for smart technology design, development and implementation in order to achieve this vision for the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Chia Tai Angus Lai, Wei Jiang and Paul R. Jackson

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how Internet of Things (IoT) technology can enable highly distributed elevator equipment servicing by using remote-monitoring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how Internet of Things (IoT) technology can enable highly distributed elevator equipment servicing by using remote-monitoring technology to facilitate a shift from traditional corrective maintenance (CM) and time-based maintenance (TBM) to more predictive, condition-based maintenance (CBM) in order to achieve various benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review indicates that CBM has advantages over conventional CM and TBM from a theoretical perspective, but it depends on continuous monitoring enhancement via advanced IoT technology. An in-depth case study was carried out to provide practical evidence that IoT enables elevator firms to achieve CBM.

Findings

From a theoretical perspective, the CBM of elevators makes business sense. The challenges lie in data collection, data analysis and decision making in real-world business contexts. The main findings of this study suggest that CBM can be commercialized via IoT in the case of elevators and would improve the safety and reliability of equipment. It would, thus, make sense from technological, process and economic perspectives.

Practical implications

Our longitudinal real-world case study demonstrates a practical way of making the CBM of elevators widespread. Integrating IoT and other advanced technology would improve the safety and reliability of elevator equipment, prolong its useful life, minimize inconvenience and business interruptions due to equipment downtime and reduce or eliminate major repairs, thus greatly reducing maintenance costs.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper lies in the empirical demonstration of the benefits and challenges of CBM via IoT relative to conventional CM and TBM in the case of elevators. The authors believe that this study is timely and will be valuable to firms working on similar research or commercialization strategies.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Arpit Singh, Subhas C. Misra, Vinod Kumar and Uma Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to propose a practical framework to measure the safety performance of workers in the Indian construction industry. The key safety performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a practical framework to measure the safety performance of workers in the Indian construction industry. The key safety performance indicators are identified and ordered on the premise that the higher order assignment of an indicator implies a strong indication of an effective safety performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Various indicators of safety performance in the construction industry were identified from extant literature review combined with author's personal viewpoint. The identified variables were inquired for appropriateness for the Indian construction scenario by consultation with experts. Fuzzy Technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) technique was considered for the ranking of the indicators from most to least important.

Findings

The most important highlight of the study was the importance of the role of management by participating in informing workers about the safety rules and compliance toward safety measures. Proper and timely safety training to the workers and equipping them with sophisticated safety equipment for daily activities is perceived to be highly important in ensuring a safe and healthy workplace environment. Controlling the absenteeism rate reduces the burden of extra work on the employees, thereby, encouraging safe work-related behavior.

Originality/value

Senior management should make safety induction programs compulsory at the time of joining of the employees. The guidelines for safety practices, rules and information about the safety equipment should be properly documented and arranged in safety manuals. Periodical drills involving visual demonstration of the safety practices should be followed to ensure safety at workplace.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1985

Peter Ellis and David Tong

Without doubt office work is becoming more hazardous. Much health and safety literature deals with risks that are always with us — like falling off ladders, tripping over…

Abstract

Without doubt office work is becoming more hazardous. Much health and safety literature deals with risks that are always with us — like falling off ladders, tripping over cables, toppling file cabinets and blocked fire exits. But there is increasing worldwide concern now over the health hazards of toxic materials in the office, viral and bacterial infection from air conditioning systems, radiation hazards from VDUs, and the danger of strain injuries from repetitive use of badly designed equipment.

Details

Facilities, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Peter Fairbrother

The question of health and safety at work is a central issue for trade unions. In Britain it is an area of concern where there were important legislative initiatives in…

Abstract

The question of health and safety at work is a central issue for trade unions. In Britain it is an area of concern where there were important legislative initiatives in the 1970s and 1980s, although surprisingly this has received relatively little attention in the debates about trade unionism. This neglect results in an aspect of union activity about which little is known. Explores through a detailed longitudinal study of a middle‐range engineering firm, from the late 1970s into the 1990s, the ways in which trade unions organize and act on health and safety questions. Argues that it is almost “routine” that workers face dangers and hazards at work, a central feature of the work and employment experience of most workers. However, this is often difficult to deal with as individual issues, or as matters which are subject to collective consideration. On the one hand, workers often appear to accept the dangers and hazards they face. On the other hand, managements are preoccupied with questions relating to production and finance, rather than the day‐to‐day problems faced by workers. This tension suggests that the future wellbeing of workers in unionized workplaces lies not so much with legislative provisions and rights at work, but in education and the organizing ability of workplace unions, raising and addressing what often seem like individualistic problems in collective ways.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Eddie W.L. Cheng, H. Li, D.P. Fang and F. Xie

This paper aims at presenting the analysis of the views of construction participants in China’s construction industry on three major site safety issues. First, data from…

Abstract

This paper aims at presenting the analysis of the views of construction participants in China’s construction industry on three major site safety issues. First, data from three distinctive roles (project managers, safety officers, and foremen) on site safety knowledge were analysed. Results indicate that they have low levels of safety knowledge. This is consistent with the existing literature, implying that safety training and education is a major issue around the world. In addition, the views of project managers and safety officers are further elicited on the second issue (that is, factors affecting site safety) and the third issue (that is, methods for improving project safety management). Results indicate that both parties have quite consistent views. The six most important factors are “lack of attention to safety protection by workers”, “lack of attention to safety management by main contractors/project managers”, “insufficient safety training”, “inadequate safety level”, “tiredness of workers”, and “poor quality of construction materials and equipments”. The five most promising methods are “increase in safety investment in terms of manpower, capital and finance”, “improvement in safety operations”, “no alcohol at work”, “increase in safety training and education for workers”, and “increase in safety inspection”. Discussions are given in this paper.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 24000