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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Natalya Subbotina

The purpose of this paper is to open a theoretical discussion on the preventive anti‐money laundering (AML) regime, both international and domestic in Russia, building…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to open a theoretical discussion on the preventive anti‐money laundering (AML) regime, both international and domestic in Russia, building theoretical assumptions on the role of epistemic community in the AML network in Russia.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion is based on the analysis of the preventive pillar of the AML regime in Russia. Cognitive (or knowledge‐based) approach is used to study domestic AML regime and to reveal the main reason of the network deficiencies in Russia.

Findings

The paper argues that the representatives of banking community in Russia should play the role of epistemic community to foster better understanding of the context and purposes of the AML regime, thus, decreasing uncertainty, facilitating cooperation between the stakeholders, and eventually having a great influence on the quality of the AML regulations elaborated by the policy makers.

Research limitations/implications

The paper limits its scope to the study of money laundering (ML) prevention focusing on the financial institutions – banks – which play the most important role in Russian AML network.

Practical implications

The paper reveals the roles of the main actors of Russian AML regime play. The ineffectiveness of the regime could be eased by increasing communication and cooperation between the stakeholders. The formal compliance approach used by the regulator in the financial sector supervision has not been effective and should be reviewed with the shift to the reasonable judgment approach used by both supervisor and financial institutions to prevent ML in Russia.

Originality/value

Studies of the peculiarities of the AML legislation implementation in different countries is one of the helpful tools to measure the efficiency of the global AML regime.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Emmanuel Lazega

This paper provides an analytical theory of appropriateness judgments that introduces structural dimensions in the study of social rationality of organization members…

Abstract

This paper provides an analytical theory of appropriateness judgments that introduces structural dimensions in the study of social rationality of organization members. This approach helps explore the coevolution of members’ relative position in structure and normative choices in their organization. Illustration of this approach is based on the study of controversial judicial decisions and dynamics of advice networks in a courthouse where lay judges have to choose between punitive and nonpunitive awards in cases of unfair competition in business. In this case, coevolution is facilitated by an endogenous process of centralization–decentralization–recentralization of advice networks over time, and by use of a procedural “weak legal culture” that helps align and homogenize conflicting normative choices among organization members. It is suggested that this approach to social rationality helps revisit our understanding of social processes, in this case collective learning and secondary socialization in organizations and flexible labor markets.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Senem Güney and James R. Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to explore the problem of reconfiguring epistemic boundaries and the authority relationships that these boundaries represent in corporate R&D…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the problem of reconfiguring epistemic boundaries and the authority relationships that these boundaries represent in corporate R&D. The authors focus the analysis on the mediation of this reconfiguration by project management tools, specifically the development plan and its subsidiary roadmaps and timelines.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze discourse data from an ethnographic study to show in situ the communication about and through project management tools in collaborative project development. The concepts of organizational map and mapping from the perspective of the communicative constitution of organization (CCO) frame the close-up analysis of this communication.

Findings

The analysis reveals how the plan and its subsidiary texts participate in the negotiation and legitimation of epistemic ownership and authority for a collaborative strategy to be implemented. The authors illustrate the material agency of these texts in the objectification and prioritization of strategic choices in this implementation.

Research limitations/implications

To conclude, the authors discuss the significance of exploring the mapping function of supposedly mundane representational tools used in project management.

Originality/value

The originality of this study comes from applying the organizational map concept to demonstrate the politically charged materiality of project management tools in the discursive establishment of authority and accomplishment of corporate strategy.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Lorne Cummings and Chris Patel

What has emerged from the first three chapters has been the increasingly global environment within which organisations operate. This is particularly so in the Asia-Pacific…

Abstract

What has emerged from the first three chapters has been the increasingly global environment within which organisations operate. This is particularly so in the Asia-Pacific region, which due to its continued urbanisation, is undergoing profound economic and social change. Despite stakeholder theory offering a new perspective on the traditional principal–agent relationship that had existed implicitly between both the manager and “shareholder” and the manager and “debtholder”, little has been done theoretically to explain and predict differences in “stakeholder” prominence across countries that embody different economic and social levels of development. As mentioned in Chapter 3, a Positive Stakeholder Theory approach, which seeks to understand stakeholder prominence through an AHP, is a means by which to enrich stakeholder theory beyond the confines of the prescriptive.

Details

Managerial Attitudes toward a Stakeholder Prominence within a Southeast Asia Context
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-255-5

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Esben Houborg and Rasmus Munksgaard Andersen

The purpose of this paper is to map research communities related to heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) and the scientific network they are part of to determine their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map research communities related to heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) and the scientific network they are part of to determine their structure and content.

Design/methodology/approach

Co-authorship as the basis for conducting social network analysis with regard to degree, weighted degree, betweenness centrality, and edge betweenness centrality.

Findings

A number of central researchers were identified on the basis of the number of their collaborative relations. Central actors were also identified on the basis of their position in the research network. In total, 11 research communities were constructed with different scientific content. HAT research communities are closely connected to medical, psychiatric, and epidemiological research and very loosely connected to social research.

Originality/value

The first mapping of the collaborative network HAT researchers using social network methodology.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Michal Sedlacko

The chapter questions the low demand for scholarly (scientific research) competence of civil servants through identifying practical and transformative uses of scientific…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter questions the low demand for scholarly (scientific research) competence of civil servants through identifying practical and transformative uses of scientific knowledge in professionals’ practice, thus arguing for a particular type of scholarly competence in professional degree programs.

Design/methodoloy/approach

The chapter conceptually develops a theory of practitioners’ knowing in action that reframes use of scientific knowledge as part of practical inquiry.

Findings

The chapter formulates the notion of extended ‘scientific temper’ to open up spaces for reflection in the context of everyday professional practice and avoid the pitfalls of technical rationality. It argues for an ontological – as opposed to mere epistemological – dimension of knowing in action. It suggests that changes in practitioners’ stance in line with the extended ‘scientific temper’ enable specific uses of scientific knowledge and help achieve aims of emancipation and transformation.

Practical implications

The chapter sketches a list of scholarly competencies and principles of didactics of training scholarly competence of civil servants in line with the notion of extended ‘scientific temper’ and post-structuralist paradigms in science.

Originality/value

The chapter’s value lies in reconceptualising the use of scientific knowledge in relation to everyday professional practice in public administration.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Bjorn H. Nordtveit and Fadia Nordtveit

The implications and impacts of the educational intelligent economy from the vantage point of digital frontierism is explored using a decolonial framework, with a specific…

Abstract

The implications and impacts of the educational intelligent economy from the vantage point of digital frontierism is explored using a decolonial framework, with a specific focus on Big Data and data sharing in Comparative and International Education (CIE). Recent debates are reviewed about CIE’s past histories and its current directions to tease out their implications for data sharing. The authors demonstrate how data sharing continues to reinforce imperialism through control, dissemination, and application of data, and how electronic and digital colonialism preserve current intellectual and structural hegemonies. Then, we give an example of how donors and funding agencies, including the National Science Foundation, engage in neoliberal scientism and control of data, and how it affects the future of social sciences, including CIE. Our inquiry is at the intersections of economic intelligence and educational intelligence in a rapidly evolving technocentric, data-dominated, and networked economy. The authors demonstrate how educational intelligence in the global economy may exacerbate the asymmetric access to data between the global North and the South, as educational data are increasingly becoming global commodities to be traded between various public and private actors. Finally, the authors argue that decolonial participatory research designs that aim at positive, sustained transformations, as opposed to the stagnancy of Big Data and data mining, should be used to address the problems inherent to the Educational Intelligent Economy.

Details

The Educational Intelligent Economy: Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and the Internet of Things in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-853-4

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Thembani Mbadlanyana, Nompumelelo Sibalukhulu and Jakkie Cilliers

The purpose of this article is to understand alternative African futures as an aid to improved decision‐making and action by governments and by other key agents and stakeholders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to understand alternative African futures as an aid to improved decision‐making and action by governments and by other key agents and stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors aim is to put the two concepts (“futures” and think tank) into context and explain how they are going to be used in this paper. The aim is not to engage on a prediction exercise about African futures but rather to understand, think about and explore long‐term trends and how they may impact on alternative African futures.

Findings

The journey towards a knowledge economy is a difficult one and the experiences elsewhere in the world show that governments on their own can not succeed without assistance from think tanks. This means that as African governments are trying to map out new visions for the future, think tanks can grab the opportunities provided by the current realities to continue playing a meaningful role in shaping African futures.

Originality/value

Africa's complex challenges demand the best of intellectual capacities. Think tanks are potentially one of the best‐suited organizations to develop innovative and advanced solutions to Africa's challenges. They have a special role to play in shaping African futures, both as knowledge providers and policy formulation partners.

Details

Foresight, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Abstract

Details

Comparative and International Education: Survey of an Infinite Field
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-392-2

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

J. Tuomas Harviainen

The purpose of this paper is to present findings on the way in which self-identified sadomasochist apply their information literacy skills, and to analyse those…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings on the way in which self-identified sadomasochist apply their information literacy skills, and to analyse those applications in the context of existing research on information literacies (IL).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the author’s two decades of ethnographic work within a national-level sadomasochist community, supplemented by interviews with 30 practitioners and an extensive literature survey.

Findings

Sadomasochists avoid the social stigma associated with their activities by developing highly refined ILs. Central among these is the ability to learn from other practitioners by reading and interpreting their actions as “texts.” They furthermore stockpile potentially useful information for later use. Their ILs not only make sadomasochists more skilled in their practices, but also provide them with safety.

Originality/value

By examining its subject community, the paper develops the ideas of embodied information literacy, currently strongly associated with workplace learning, to the hobby and lifestyle sectors, as it deals with a particularly corporeal set of ILs. This radical example allows scholars to conduct research on the ILs other communities of practice, in which the activities may be less obviously corporeal, but the literacies just as based on embodied interpretation and the reading of others’ activities as texts.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 71 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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