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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

David B. Szabla, James E. Stefanchin and Laraine S. Warner

Much has been theorized about what change strategies to employ given particular types of organizational change. Organizational theorists have linked participative…

Abstract

Much has been theorized about what change strategies to employ given particular types of organizational change. Organizational theorists have linked participative strategies with culture change, strategies based on logic and reason with new technology implementations, and power strategies with the introduction of new laws and legislation. However, to what degree are these suggested recommendations carried out in organizations? In this paper, we explored the extent to which change recipients perceive the use of theorist recommended strategies when undergoing specific types of organizational changes. Using survey research (N = 88), we investigated the perceived relationship between two components of change: change content and change strategy. The results partially follow the ideals proposed by previous theorists, but they also highlight a significant relationship between power-coercive strategies and episodic change events that is contrary to those ideals. For practitioners, our findings draw attention to the connection between change content and change strategy in the hope of offering some guidance to those change agents who must determine how to lead a particular change initiative. Additionally, since our investigation is original and exploratory, we incite future research aimed at understanding the congruency between change content and change strategy formulation.

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Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Yvonne Eriksson and Anders Fundin

Strategic changes in an organization will face challenges not only related to the changes as such but also with regard to how the vision of the future is interpreted and…

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1865

Abstract

Purpose

Strategic changes in an organization will face challenges not only related to the changes as such but also with regard to how the vision of the future is interpreted and understood by the organization. Visual management is a field of research that could contribute to change management research as a means to facilitate management of the dynamics in a change process and to facilitate the process of communication. The purpose of this paper is to problematize episodic change processes with regard to communication and to contribute with a proposed model on how to facilitate dynamic strategic change management using visual management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an interdisciplinary approach by linking change management literature to visual communication to be used for visual management.

Findings

A proposed model presents how a dynamic episodic change process can be managed in terms of visual management, potential pitfalls to avoid, and what ambidextrous capabilities are needed throughout the complete episodic change.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model is still yet theoretical, based on a literature review of dynamic change management and visual communication. Future research will validate the model in practice to confirm its robustness.

Practical implications

An implementation of visual management in Kotter’s (1995) eight steps on how to strategically manage change in combination with theories on ambidexterity and episodic change is suggested.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to how visual management can support change management by combining visual communication and change management.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Victoria Bellou and Ioanna Chatzinikou

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect that training and development have on employee burnout during episodic organizational changes. Moreover, it investigates…

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2981

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect that training and development have on employee burnout during episodic organizational changes. Moreover, it investigates the mediating role of overall job satisfaction (OJS) in conjunction with the moderating role of personal computer (PC) literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in Greece, in four branches of a public organization which adopted a new information technology (IT) system. Statistical analyses include exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis for instrument testing and multiple regressions for mediated moderation.

Findings

The findings provide partial support to the hypotheses. It appears that employee training and development are significant predictors of burnout, indeed. However, OJS mediates the effect of one dimension of each, namely training effectiveness and support. Concerning PC literacy, a full-mediated moderation was revealed in the case of training effectiveness and a partial-mediated moderation in the case of support.

Research limitations/implications

As with most studies examining change initiatives, the main limitations of this study are the cross-sectional design, the possible self-selection bias, and the limited sample size.

Practical implications

The findings are important for preventing burnout during IT-related episodic changes, facilitating the successful implementation of change.

Originality/value

To the best of knowledge, this study is the first to examine burnout in a changing public setting. Additionally, no previous direct evidence exists regarding the relationship between training and development and burnout while the evidence on the impact of organizational resources on burnout is scarce.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Rihana Shaik, Ranjeet Nambudiri and Manoj Kumar Yadav

The purpose of this paper is to provide a process model on how mindfully performed organisational routines can simultaneously enable organisational stability and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a process model on how mindfully performed organisational routines can simultaneously enable organisational stability and organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

Via conceptual analysis, the authors develop several propositions and a process model integrating the theory of mindfulness and performative aspects of organisational routines with organisational stability and change. To do so, the authors review the literature on organisational routines, mindfulness, stability, inertia and change.

Findings

First, the authors demonstrate that, based on levels of mindfulness employed, performative aspects of organisational routines can be categorised as mindless, mindful and collectively mindful (meta-routines). Second, in the process model, the authors position the mindless performance of routines as enabling organisational stability, mediated through inertial pressure and disabling change, mediated through constrained change capacities. Finally, the authors state that engaging routines with mindfulness at an individual (mindful routines) or collective (meta-routines) level reduces inertia and facilitates change. Such simultaneous engagement leads to either sustaining stability when required or implementing continuous organisational change.

Research limitations/implications

The framework uses continuous, versus episodic, change; future research can consider the model’s workability with episodic change. Future research can also seek to empirically validate the model. The authors hope that this model informs research in organisational change and provides guidance on addressing organisational inertia.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to categorise the performative aspects of organisational routine based on the extent of mindfulness employed and propose that mindfulness-based practice of routines stimulates either inertia-induced or inertia-free stability and continuous change.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Kevin K. Jones, Richard L. Baskerville, Ram S. Sriram and Balasubramaniam Ramesh

The purpose of this study is to show how the presence of change caused a shift in the roles and responsibilities of the internal audit function (IAF).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to show how the presence of change caused a shift in the roles and responsibilities of the internal audit function (IAF).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological design/approach was constructed by combining specific aspects of widely known management accounting and organizational change frameworks. The theoretical premise was based on the old institutional economics component of institutional theory. As such, this study used the case study method to examine and analyze the impact of this change in eight specific organizations using the new two-tiered organizational change framework.

Findings

This new framework analyzes the multidimensional facets of organizational change in the IAF. From the findings, it was observed that the change can be evolutionary, episodic, continuous and/or teleological, and people, organisms and organizations that are subject to it will react or respond to that change in a myriad of ways.

Practical implications

Moreover, the implications of change can be environmental, socioeconomic and political.

Originality/value

This study makes an intellectual contribution by introducing a new two-tiered organizational change framework to explain the IAF’s response to the environmental change factor of regulation.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Mary A. Ferdig and James D. Ludema

Complexity theorists propose that organizations are made up of complex responsive processes in which people create and recreate organizational forms through dynamic…

Abstract

Complexity theorists propose that organizations are made up of complex responsive processes in which people create and recreate organizational forms through dynamic micro-level interactions. Social constructionists add that conversations are the means by which these interactions occur. Our analysis illustrates how the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) engaged a wide range of stakeholders in a successful dialogue process to recreate a new system for monitoring nuclear reactors. The success was due, in large part, to the conversational qualities tacitly and explicitly agreed to by those involved in the process which included a spirit of freedom, inclusion, inquiry, spontaneity, and possibility. Using a grounded theory building process, we show how these qualities produced transformative change by increasing levels of interconnectivity, shared identity, and collective capacity among participants. These findings provide the beginnings of a model for understanding continuous and transformative change and demonstrate the value of engaging the “whole system” in sustained dialogue, even in complex, highly regulated environments.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-167-5

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Ruben Pinedo‐Cuenca, Pablo Gonzalez Olalla and Djoko Setijono

The purpose of this paper is to establish a link between Six Sigma and organizational change theory. Specifically, a framework that aligns Six Sigma critical…

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1281

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a link between Six Sigma and organizational change theory. Specifically, a framework that aligns Six Sigma critical success/hindering factors and the antecedents of successful organizational change process.

Design/methodology/approach

A theory‐derived framework containing Six Sigma's critical success and hindering factors at each stage of Lewinian change process is first proposed. Then, the framework is compared against the findings from a case study of Six Sigma improvement project in a UK, make‐to‐order, small to medium‐sized enterprise (SME).

Findings

There is a great deal of congruence (consistency) between Six Sigma's critical success factors and the antecedents of successful organizational change. Addressing people's “soft” skills (e.g. commitment, involvement, and communication) is necessary to “unfreeze” the equilibrium. The actual change and confrontation, which occur during “move” stage, requires a combination of both “software” and “hardware” of the organization (i.e. teamwork, methods/tools, organizational structure and culture). It is important for SMEs to provide resources during the “freeze” stage and justify the benefits of change, in order to sustain the change efforts.

Research limitations/implications

This research was based on a single case of Six Sigma improvement project. However, future research will be conducted as a longitudinal study, to capture richer insights from the change process.

Originality/value

This paper offers a practical overview of how Six Sigma can be utilized as a change driver in SMEs and the enablers and barriers of success to be considered, especially during the early stage of adoption.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

H. Jack Walker, Achilles A. Armenakis and Jeremy B. Bernerth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the integrative influence of content, context, process, and individual differences on organizational change efforts.

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19813

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the integrative influence of content, context, process, and individual differences on organizational change efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from employees involved in a recent de‐merger. Using structural equation modeling, a hypothesized model that integrated individual differences with change content, context, and process factors was tested.

Findings

Results led to the acceptance of a model indicating that change context mediated the relationship between individual differences and change process and content. Similarly, change content and process mediated the relationship between change context and organizational change commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the nature of the study, inferences of causality cannot be made. Additionally, common method bias may be a concern because criterion and response variables were collected at the same time.

Practical implications

An organization's prior change history (i.e. context) has the potential to negatively influence change success. In order to counteract these effects, change agents should concentrate on clearly communicating the change details (i.e. process) to employees.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to integrate factors common to all change efforts, i.e. content, context, process and individual differences. Further, it elaborates on how these factors interact to influence change success.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2014

Brian Leavy

In this Masterclass Prof Leavy considers some game changing advice about how to manage the fundamental challenges of the spread of hyper-competition and speed at which…

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5248

Abstract

Purpose

In this Masterclass Prof Leavy considers some game changing advice about how to manage the fundamental challenges of the spread of hyper-competition and speed at which knowledge advantages now typically erode. His intent is to advance the dialogue among the corporate strategy, innovation, leadership and entrepreneurship functions.

Design/methodology/approach

The concepts and tools of three new books are studied closely: in The End of Competitive Advantage, strategy and innovation guru Rita Gunther McGrath offers a strategy playbook for what she calls the new “transient advantage economy; in Accelerate, change leadership researcher, John Kotter, makes the case for developing a new “strategy operating system” to run in tandem with the traditional “performance operating system,” so that renewal can become continuous rather than episodic; and in The Good Struggle, leadership and ethics expert, Joseph Badarraco turns to five enduring questions of responsible leadership and looks for the emerging answers that might offer the most valuable guidance to leaders now having to operate in today’s recombinant environment.

Findings

The perspectives provided can help leaders raise the odds of working successfully and responsibly in the exciting, uncertain, recombinant, market-driven world that now surrounds us all.

Practical implications

Clearly, not only do companies have to be become ever more adaptable, but ever more innovative. Lessons in how to do so are offered and exemplars are examined.

Originality/value

The article looks at three management compentencies-strategy making, organization building and enlightened leadership – in the context of the disruptive, hypercompetitive environment of transient advantage.

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Kazuhiko Ozawa

Drawing on insights from change experience research, the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managers’ experiences, as change recipients, on…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on insights from change experience research, the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managers’ experiences, as change recipients, on organizational change implemented by the managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Since the Japanese sports context fits well with the aims of this research, longitudinal data of Japanese baseball are used to test the hypotheses. The data set was created using resources such as books published by Japanese baseball institutions. Following previous research, teams are regarded as organizations, and the number of changed players in teams per year is considered. The hypotheses have been tested using regression analysis on a yearly basis.

Findings

Managers’ experiences as change recipients are an essential determinant of organizational change. The findings show that the amount of change these managers experience is associated with the magnitude of organizational change they implement. Past change experiences in each organization positively moderates this relationship.

Originality/value

Previous studies examined managers’ experience after their appointment, and showed its influence on organizational change. However, scarce research examines the effect of managers’ experiences as change recipients on the organizational change they implement. Thus, this is the first study to analyze and test the effects of such experiences on organizational change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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