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Article

Pradeep Kautish and Rajesh Sharma

The purpose of this study is to examine the functional relationships among terminal and instrumental values, environmental consciousness and behavioral intentions for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the functional relationships among terminal and instrumental values, environmental consciousness and behavioral intentions for green products in India in light of the value–attitude–behavior framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a hypo-deductive research design. A conceptual model was developed to relate the terminal and instrumental values to environmental consciousness and behavioral intentions, which are substantiated with a comprehensive literature review. Covariance-based structural equation modeling was used along with Anderson and Gerbing’s two-step research approach to measure the dimensions of the measurement model, as well as the specifications of the structural model.

Findings

The findings of the research indicate that terminal and instrumental values significantly influence environmental consciousness, and environmental consciousness has a significant influence on behavioral intentions. Instrumental value shows a greater influence on environmental consciousness and behavioral intentions, rather than terminal value. Furthermore, this study discloses that environmental consciousness acts as a partial mediator while establishing a link between instrumental/terminal value and behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The present research is based on two distinct forms of human values, namely, terminal values and instrumental values. The study found that consumers who favored instrumental values to terminal values revealed a tendency to frame confused and incoherent judgments on environmental issues.

Practical implications

The study will help green marketing practitioners understand the important role of values, that is, both terminal and instrumental values, in promoting environmental consciousness and behavioral intentions for green products. The findings of the study will facilitate decision-making processes in relation to marketing for green product consumers in the Indian context.

Social implications

Values are the guiding forces for human behavior, both socially and individually. Moreover, values have a long-lasting impression on consumers in varied forms. This study will pave the way forward by contributing to the societal understanding of consumer values within the realms of human values for green marketing, green consumerism and sustainable businesses.

Originality/value

The paper is the first attempt of its kind to explore the relationships among two distinct forms of values that are the foundation of human values, namely, terminal and instrumental values, and their effect on environmental consciousness and behavioral intentions for green products in the Indian market. The paper is unique in understanding factors contributing to green marketing beyond consumer values and differs from previous research in specifying the significance of human values.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article

Katja Soyez

The purpose of this paper is to link national cultural values to personal pro‐environmental value orientations, in order to investigate why the salience of pro…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link national cultural values to personal pro‐environmental value orientations, in order to investigate why the salience of pro‐environmental value orientations differs cross‐culturally. A value‐based model is proposed and tested in a multinational study.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical investigation of 1,096 consumers was conducted in five nations with a different cultural profile on the two cultural dimensions in‐group collectivism and assertiveness. The paper applies multi‐group structural equation modelling to test the moderating effect of culture on the impact of pro‐environmental values on attitudes and subjective norms.

Findings

The study reveals that the influence of a pro‐environmental value orientation differs substantially, according to national cultural values. While an ecocentric value orientation is important in the US, Canadian, German, and Australian samples which hold individualistic values, an anthropocentric value orientation is salient in the Russian sample, characterized by collectivistic values. The hypothesized influence of the national cultural value assertiveness, however, could not be established decisively.

Research limitations/implications

First, the present study considers culture as a national value on an aggregated level. Future studies should take into account cultural values at different levels of aggregation. Second, since only one collectivistic society is the object of the investigation, the results are limited in terms of generalizability.

Practical implications

In order to address the ecocentric value orientation in the analyzed individualistic societies, marketers should emphasize benefits for the environment in the USA, Canada, Australia, and Germany. By contrast, the positive consequences for humankind in general and future generations should be stressed in the collectivistic Russian sample.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by integrating both individual and national perspectives on the value‐based drivers of environmental concern. The study also provides insight into pro‐environmental consumer behavior in an emerging market (namely Russia), which has so far been neglected in cross‐cultural research.

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Article

Muhammad Abid Saleem, Lynne Eagle, Asif Yaseen and David Low

In the wake of growing environmental issues, active public and corporate interventions are inevitable to reduce the negative impact of human activities on global…

Abstract

Purpose

In the wake of growing environmental issues, active public and corporate interventions are inevitable to reduce the negative impact of human activities on global environments. Building on the Norm Activation Model and Value-Belief-Norm Theory, the purpose of this paper is to report on research exploring consumers’ eco-socially conscious behaviours related to the choice and use of personal cars in a developing country, Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

To test a moderated-mediation model of environmental values, perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE), spirituality and eco-socially conscious consumer behaviours (ESCCBs), data were collected from 447 customers of three automobile manufacturing firms from eight different cities of Pakistan. The data collection was undertaken by using a self-administered questionnaire based on key themes in the literature.

Findings

Analysis of the data revealed that altruistic and egoistic values were negatively while biospheric values were positively associated with eco-ESCCB. PCE mediated all the relationships and spirituality moderated the mediated paths.

Originality/value

Although there are several models that explain purchase and use of personal cars in isolation or in conjunction with other general pro-environmental behaviours, an explanation of the eco-social aspects of purchase and use of personal cars in one theoretical model is rare to find. Second, among the many theoretical predictors and intervening factors explaining several pro-environmental behaviours, some culture-specific factors have been ignored – spirituality being one of them. This study contributes to the body of knowledge related to pro-environmental behaviours by conceptualising and testing the impact of spirituality in a moderated-mediation model.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Abstract

Details

Contingent Valuation: A Critical Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-860-5

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Article

Muhammad Tamar, Hillman Wirawan, Triani Arfah and Retno Pratiwi Sutopo Putri

This study aims to investigate the effect of prosocial values on pro-environmental behaviours via attitudes in which environmental knowledge and proself values moderate…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effect of prosocial values on pro-environmental behaviours via attitudes in which environmental knowledge and proself values moderate the relationship. This study also examines the application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Cognitive Dissonance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a quantitative method to examine potential positive or negative moderating effects of environmental knowledge and proself values on environmental attitudes and behaviour. Participants were undergraduate students recruited from a state university in the eastern part of Indonesia. The online survey link was randomly sent to 500 students in 14 different Faculties with a response rate of 57% (285) participants (80% female). Data were analysed using a moderated-mediation regression technique.

Findings

The results suggested that only biospheric value positively affected pro-environmental behaviours. Environmental knowledge negatively moderated the relationship between prosocial values and environmental attitudes. Similarly, high egoistic value potentially reduced the effect of environmental attitude on pro-environmental behaviours. Environmental knowledge could impede the positive impacts of prosocial values while egoistic value negates the effect of attitude on pro-environmental attitude.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings supported most hypotheses, this study did not control the effect of some demographic variables such as education and social-economic status. Participants tended to share some similar characteristics, which potentially influenced the results.

Originality/value

This study challenged some common antecedents of pro-environmental behaviours and offered some alternative explanations. This study has offered a new insight in understanding unique interactions among values, knowledge and attitude.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Book part

Andreas Kontoleon, Richard Macrory and Timothy Swanson

The paper focuses on the question of the extent to which individual preference-based values are suitable in guiding environmental policy and damage assessment decisions…

Abstract

The paper focuses on the question of the extent to which individual preference-based values are suitable in guiding environmental policy and damage assessment decisions. Three criteria for “suitableness” are reviewed: conceptual, moral and legal. Their discussion suggests that: (i) the concept of economic value as applied to environmental resources is a meaningful concept based on the notion of trade-off; (ii) the limitations of the moral foundations of cost-benefit analysis do not invalidate its use as a procedure for guiding environmental decision making; (iii) the input of individual preferences into damage assessment is compatible with the basic foundations of tort law; (iv) using individual preference-based methods provides incentives for efficient levels of due care; (v) determining standing is still very contentious for various categories of users as well as for aggregating non-use values. Overall, the discussion suggests that the use of preference-based approaches in both the policy and legal arenas is warranted provided that they are accurately applied, their limitations are openly acknowledged and they assume an information-providing rather than a determinative role.

Details

An Introduction to the Law and Economics of Environmental Policy: Issues in Institutional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-888-0

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Article

Janeen Olsen, Liz Thach and Liz Hemphill

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one product category, organic wine, to provide a possible explanation for consumers' purchase behaviors regarding organic wine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one product category, organic wine, to provide a possible explanation for consumers' purchase behaviors regarding organic wine. Specifically, the authors consider the role of environmental protection and hedonistic values and their impact on organic wine purchases.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are proposed to examine relationships between environmental and hedonic values in organic wine purchasing. Online survey data were collected from 321 wine drinkers in the USA. Partial least‐squared analysis was used to test hypothesized paths between latent variables.

Findings

In total, ten of the 13 proposed linkages were supported by the data. Values reflecting the need for environmental protection and for living a hedonistic life were found to lead to belief systems that influence the purchase of organic wines.

Research limitations/ implications

The results demonstrate that hedonistic and environmental protection values and beliefs can partially explain the propensity to purchase organic wines. The study is limited in that only two values were investigated.

Practical implications

The results indicate several marketing implications for professionals around communication, promotion, and point‐of‐sale information for organic wine.

Originality/value

This is the first study to integrate environmental and hedonistic values to explain the purchase of organic wines.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article

Zonghua Liu, Shiye Mei and Yulang Guo

Green human resource management (GHRM) is a new management philosophy and pattern that applies the concept of “green” to human resource management, which plays an…

Abstract

Purpose

Green human resource management (GHRM) is a new management philosophy and pattern that applies the concept of “green” to human resource management, which plays an important role in realizing environmental goals and obtaining competitive advantage. Based on 201 effective samples from 3 manufacturing enterprises, this study investigates the relationship between GRHM, green organization identity (GOI), environmental values and organizational citizenship behaviors for the environment (OCBEs). The results show that GRHM has a significant positive impact on OCBEs, and GOI plays an intermediary role in the relationship between GRHM and OCBEs, and environmental values moderate the impact of GRHM on GOI and OCBEs. The findings have important theoretical implications for enterprises to achieve green development strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study selects three manufacturing enterprises certified by the environmental management system ISO14001, which meet the environmental protection requirements of the Chinese Government, local communities and customers. Through interviews and referring to enterprise documents, the researchers find that the enterprises have set environmental protection standards such as energy consumption, solid waste emissions, water consumption and waste recycling. The enterprises surveyed have adopted the GRHM practice, such as green training for employees, encouraging employees to participate in green activities and so on. This study collects data in two ways: on-the-spot and entrustment questionnaire distribution. In the first stage, the data of GRHM and environmental values were collected. A total of 277 questionnaires were distributed and 264 were sent back, among them 252 were valid.

Findings

GRHM has a positive impact on OCBEs. GOI mediates the influence of GRHM on the OCBEs, and environmental values moderate the effect of GRHM on organizational identity and OCBEs.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the effect and mechanism of GRHM in China and provides theoretical guidance for enterprises to implement green management effectively.

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Article

Diana M. Hechavarría

Drawing on the multiplicity of context approach, this study investigates whether female entrepreneurs are more likely than male entrepreneurs to create environmentally…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the multiplicity of context approach, this study investigates whether female entrepreneurs are more likely than male entrepreneurs to create environmentally oriented organizations. This study aims to examine how context, measured by gender socialization stereotypes and post-materialism, differentially affects the kinds of organizations entrepreneurs choose to create.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, this study utilizes Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data from 2009 (n = 17,364) for nascent entrepreneurs, baby businesses owners and established business owners in 47 counties. This study also utilizes the World Values Surveys to measure gender ideologies and post-materialist cultural values at the country level. To test the hypotheses, a logistic multi-level model is estimated to identify the drivers of environmental venturing. Data are nested by countries, and this allows random intercepts by countries with a variance components covariance structure.

Findings

Findings indicate that female entrepreneurs are more likely to engage in ecological venturing. Societies with high levels of post-materialist national values are significantly more likely to affect female entrepreneurs to engage in environmental ventures when compared to male entrepreneurs. Moreover, traditional gender socialization stereotypes decrease the probability of engaging in environmental entrepreneurship. Likewise, female entrepreneurs in societies with strong stereotypes regarding gender socialization will more likely engage in environmental entrepreneurship than male entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

The present study uses a gender analysis approach to investigate empirical differences in environmental entrepreneurial activity based on biological sex. However, this research assumes that gender is the driver behind variations in ecopreneurship emphasis between the engagement of males and females in venturing activity. The findings suggest that female entrepreneurs pursuing ecological ventures are more strongly influenced by contextual factors, when compared to male entrepreneurs. Future research can build upon these findings by applying a more nuanced view of gender via constructivist approaches.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few to investigate ecologically oriented ventures with large-scale empirical data by utilizing a 47-country data set. As a result, it begins to open the black box of environmental entrepreneurship by investigating the role of gender, seeking to understand if men and women entrepreneurs equally engage in environmental venturing. And it responds to calls that request more research at the intersection of gender and context in terms of environmental entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article

Lei Wang, Philip Pong Weng Wong and Elangkovan Narayanan Alagas

Prior studies mostly investigated the relationship between the cognitive characteristics of individuals and their pro-environmentalism, addressing the need for green hotel…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies mostly investigated the relationship between the cognitive characteristics of individuals and their pro-environmentalism, addressing the need for green hotel operators to understand the different green purchase patterns of consumers. The problem is that, although consumers claim they are concerned about environmental issues, their purchasing behaviour does not translate, in practical terms, into actually booking green hotels. In other words, the connection between altruism, environmental knowledge and consumer visiting green hotel is fairly unexplored in the literature. This study aims to analyze the relationships of three types of altruism and two types of environmental knowledge with attitude and intention.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated theoretical research model was used, based on the value–belief–norm theory of environmentalism. The collection of 248 questionnaires was followed by subsequent empirical testing of the proposed hypotheses, which was performed using SPSS and AMOS.

Findings

The resulting outcomes show a significant positive relationship between green purchase attitude and intention. Further, the biospheric, altruistic and collectivistic values, as well as subjective and objective knowledge were shown to positively influence attitude and intention towards green hotel selection, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen online sampling method, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how visiting green hotel can be influenced by different types of altruism and environmental knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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