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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Samuel Adomako, Samuel Howard Quartey and Bedman Narteh

Previous scholarly studies have concluded that entrepreneurial orientation (EO) positively relates to firm performance and that relationship is dependent on several…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous scholarly studies have concluded that entrepreneurial orientation (EO) positively relates to firm performance and that relationship is dependent on several contingencies. The purpose of this paper is to show how managers’ passion for work and the external environment (i.e. environmental dynamism) within which firms operate interactively impact on EO-firm performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This theoretically derived research model is empirically validated using survey data from 250 small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operating in Ghana.

Findings

The study’s empirical findings indicate that passion for work strengthens the EO-performance relationship in dynamic market environments.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design of the study does not permit causal inferences to be made regarding the variables examined. Future studies may use longitudinal design to examine the causal links of the variables.

Practical implications

The study’s findings provide managers with a deeper understanding of how to achieve superior product firm performance, especially when firms are entrepreneurially oriented. The understanding of this issue can promote the development and maintenance of further entrepreneurial ventures in developing economies.

Originality/value

The paper has a strong theoretical value because to the best of authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to examine the moderating role of passion for work on the relationship between EO and firm performance in dynamic environments.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Sundas Nisar, Naveed R. Khan and Mustafa Rehman Khan

The purpose of this study was to determine how environmentally specific transformational leadership (ETFL), green training (GT) and psychological green climate (PGC…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine how environmentally specific transformational leadership (ETFL), green training (GT) and psychological green climate (PGC) affect environmental passion (EP) of employees which leads to pro-environmental behaviors (PEBs).

Design/methodology/approach

The context of the study was set in textile industry of Pakistan which holds a promising future in the international markets as an emerging export-based industry. Using purposive sampling technique, cross-sectional self-report data were collected from the employees of textile exporting firms (n = 239) of Pakistan. Hypotheses were tested using PLS-SEM.

Findings

The findings revealed that ETFL and PGC act as important predictors of EP, whereas GT plays no role in influencing EP. EP predicts green behavioral intention (GBI) of employees, in turn, GBI predicts employees' PEBs. Further, mediation analyses revealed that EP and GBI sequentially mediated the link between PGC and PEBs.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is not free from its limitations. First, the study adopted cross-sectional design that prevents the causal inferences which the researcher can make from the population. Second, the present study adopted purposive sampling technique which is a non-probability sampling technique. Third, the constructs of this study were assessed with self-report measures which are associated with social desirability bias (Podsakoff and Organ, 1986) or common-method variance (Podsakoff et al., 2003). Hence, this research suggests on the future direction of research based on these limitations.

Practical implications

As per the results of this study, it is also suggested that managers may focus more on the overall organizational and psychological climate rather than on leadership styles alone. While conducting training, the leaders must pay close attention to training objectives to ensure that they do not lead to counterproductive behaviors.

Originality/value

This research adds to the literature in the area of PEBs at micro-level by focusing on how and why employees engage in PEBs.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Jyotsna Bhatnagar and Pranati Aggarwal

In this paper, the authors propose and empirically test an integrated model which investigates the relationship between POS-E (perceived organizational support for the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors propose and empirically test an integrated model which investigates the relationship between POS-E (perceived organizational support for the environment) and employee outcomes, which are employee eco-initiatives (the first category of OCBE), employee psychological capital and alienation. Meaningful work as a mediator between POS-E and employee outcomes was also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a survey method to empirically test the hypothesized relationships on a sample of 303 respondents. For testing, Confirmatory factor analysis for the proposed and alternative models, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) based on software AMOS, version 20.0 was used. This was to ensure validity and construct distinctiveness among the variables in the study and to evaluate the fit of the hypothesized measurement model in comparison to several alternate models. To estimate the effects of meaningful work (as a mediator) on the association between POS-E and eco-initiatives, psychological capital and alienation, the authors administered Sobel test.

Findings

The present research augments the contemporary research on environmental sustainability and employee outcomes by further developing the emerging constructs of perceived organizational support of the environment (POS-E) and organized citizenship behavior toward the environment (OCBE), which is measured by eco-initiatives. The results imply that POS-E is positively associated with eco-initiatives and employee psychological capital and is negatively associated with alienation. The findings further suggest that meaningful work mediates the association between POS-E and all the outcome variables which are: employee-eco-initiatives, psychological capital and alienation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings confirm the desired direction of research and accomplished the research objective of the study. As the consequences of POS-E imply immense value for all stakeholders, decision-makers must also reflect on the means of enhancing employees' understanding. Further, it is imperative, that the organization supports their environmental goals and values, and their green engagement.

Practical implications

Results of the present study exhibit wide practical inferences for the managers. HR managers need to organize the passion for green behavior and work on intrinsic drivers of employee green engagement to let it sustain over a period of time. As society gradually expects increased organizational contributions towards environmental sustainability, this paper indicates that those employees who get an opportunity to act in coordination with environmental objectives will engage in eco-initiatives, exhibit higher psychological capital, and be less likely to feel alienated. The results imply that leaders should examine a diversity of probable interventions to enhance POS-E in order to gain from the initial rise in perceived meaningful work, employee eco-initiatives, increased psychological capital and reduced alienation. These interventions may lead to higher passion for sustainability and green behavior.

Social implications

Further, this work supports the work of Toffel and Schendler (2013), whose study states that organizations should market their environment and climate initiatives, climate activism, such that customers and suppliers appreciate their leadership, and understands what matters. This work supports the work of Turaga et al. (2010), whose study states that for pro-environment behavior, environment passion is an intrinsic behavior which is needed (see Afsar et al., 2016). The current study enhances the need to trigger employee's sense of pro-environment passion at work place for significant results.

Originality/value

This is a pioneer study, in India which confirms and extends the construct of POS-E using Social Exchange theory as an underpinning theory. We found that POS-E was linked with previously untested employee consequences, like employee eco-initiatives and psychological capital and that it was negatively associated with alienation. Our study confirmed mediator variable to be meaningful work in the relationship between POS-E and psychological capital, alienation and eco-initiatives

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2020

Talat Islam, Mubbsher Munawar Khan, Ishfaq Ahmed and Khalid Mahmood

Human misbehaviors are responsible for climate change as they waste resources and pollute water and air that dilapidate the environment. Considering the fact and…

Abstract

Purpose

Human misbehaviors are responsible for climate change as they waste resources and pollute water and air that dilapidate the environment. Considering the fact and contributing to the United Nations sustainable development goals of 2019, organizations started focusing their green HRM practices to develop employees' green attitudes and behaviors. This study is an attempt in this direction. It examines the impact of ethical leadership on individuals' green in-role and extra-role behaviors with the mediating role of green HRM practices and the moderating role of individual green values.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collected data from 645 MBA executive students working in various manufacturing industries with at least one year of experience. The data were collected using a questionnaire-based survey in two-time lags.

Findings

Hypothesized relationships are tested through structural equation modeling. Findings reflected a significant impact of ethical leadership on green HRM practices, in-role, and extra-role green behaviors. Besides, green HRM practices mediated the relationship between ethical leadership and both types of green behaviors. Furthermore, it was observed that the individual green values strengthened the association between green HRM practices and both types of green behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design with time lags was used to avoid common method bias. The findings of the study contribute to supply-value-fit theory and validate the scale of individual green value.

Practical implications

This study guides management that employees only perceive their organizational practices as green when they find their leaders are ethical. Further, considering individual green values in the recruitment process can help organizations accomplishing their green goals.

Originality/value

This study is novel in examining the mediating role of green HRM practices between ethical leadership and green behaviors. Further, the analysis not only validates the scale of individual green values but also noted its moderating role between green HRM and green behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Zhengqiao Liu, Yongzhong Jiang, Zhu Yao, Xiliang Liu, Li Zhao and Xianchun Zhang

Based on self-consistency theory and conservation of resource theory, this study aims to discuss the impact of career calling congruence on employees’ innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on self-consistency theory and conservation of resource theory, this study aims to discuss the impact of career calling congruence on employees’ innovation performance (IP) and analyzes the mediating effect of work passion [harmonious passion (HP) and obsessive passion (OP)].

Design/methodology/approach

To avoid serious common method biases, data in this paper were collected at three-wave. This paper investigated 381 employees to assess their career calling in time 1, measured their work passion in time 2 and assessed the IP of these employees in time 3. This paper also conducts confirmatory factor analysis, polynomial regression, response surface analysis, bootstrapping test and simple slope test to verify the research hypothesis in this paper.

Findings

In the career calling congruence case, employees’ HP, OP and IP are higher when both levels of serving oneself career calling and helping others career calling are high than when both are low; In the career calling incongruence case, employees’ HP, OP and IP are higher in the “low serving oneself and high helping others” case than in the “high serving oneself and low helping others” case; The more congruent the “serving oneself” and “helping others” career calling are, the higher the employees’ HP, OP and IP will be; and HP and OP mediate the relationship between career calling congruence and IP.

Originality/value

This study further clarifies the structure of career calling and find the positive effects of career calling on IP. The results present a deeper understanding of career calling and are universal applicable to the eastern culture context.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Chamila Perera and Chandana Hewege

This study aims to explore how young adults understand the climate change problem. It also explores whether environmental paradigms explain how young adults perceive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how young adults understand the climate change problem. It also explores whether environmental paradigms explain how young adults perceive climate change risks in their everyday green conscious behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This interpretive research draws on in-depth interviews with 20 young Australians (aged between 19-25 years) who engage in green conscious behavior.

Findings

Three thematic categories (“non-local” climate change risk, oscillation between environmental paradigms and anthropocentric environmentalism) emerged from the data. The study finds that “non-local” climate change risk perceptions and environmental paradigms inform green conscious behavior. However, no association between environmental paradigms and climate change risk perceptions is found. The study postulates a skeletal theoretical framework for understanding the green conscious behavior of young adults.

Practical implications

Recommendations are provided on how to sustain young adults’ interest in environmental wellbeing and in promoting green commodities in young consumer markets. Suggestions include creating a clear awareness of climate change with a constructive or positive appeal resolving ‘non-local’ climate change risk perceptions and position green commodities as “pro-actions” or “solutions”, as opposed to “reactions”, when reaching young consumer markets.

Originality/value

A high level of green consciousness among young adults is recorded in recent global surveys. This green conscious young consumer segment, however, appears to be largely ignored by green commodity marketers. This study provides green commodity marketers with necessary insights to explore the opportunities that might arise in this unique market segment.

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2020

Olawole Fawehinmi, Mohd Yusoff Yusliza, Zaleha Mohamad, Juhari Noor Faezah and Zikri Muhammad

Studies have highlighted concerns about the role of knowledge creation between human resource management practices and employee behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies have highlighted concerns about the role of knowledge creation between human resource management practices and employee behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of green human resource management (green HRM) on employee green behaviour (EGB) through the mediation of environmental knowledge of lecturers in public research universities in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study examines the mechanism in which green HRM affects the EGB of lecturers through environmental knowledge in Malaysian public research universities. Smart PLS was used to analyse the relationships from 425 valid responses.

Findings

The findings of the study show that green HRM affects EGB through the full mediation of environmental knowledge. This finding gives a theoretical implication in terms of ability, motivation and opportunity theory.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this study is limited to public research universities in Malaysia. Future studies may explore other variables that could expedite the relationship between green HRM and EGB. Implications include policy making that emphasises on enhancing environmental knowledge of lecturers.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no study has been conducted using environmental knowledge as a mediator between green HRM and EGB.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2020

Mrudula Manoj, Anjitha Ram Das, Arun Chandran and Santanu Mandal

Recent studies have classified ecotourism behaviour into specific components like site-specific ecological, pro-environmental and environmental learning behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent studies have classified ecotourism behaviour into specific components like site-specific ecological, pro-environmental and environmental learning behaviour. However, the role of materialism in generating these types of behaviour is not clearly understood. Materialism might also affect tourists' environmental engagement. Hence, this study embarks on exploring these research gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

All the constructs were operationalized as first-order factors based on extant scales of measurement. After suitable pretesting, the study was able to collect 122 valid responses. The responses were analysed using partial least squares (PLS).

Findings

Results suggest that environmental engagement and environmental learning behaviour have prominent roles as enablers. Furthermore, the importance of materialism is not statistically significant and requires further investigation.

Research limitations/implications

While the study showed that environmental engagement is a crucial precursor for the development of different types of ecotourism behaviour, it also has limitations. First, the study tested the validity of the proposed associations based on the perceptual responses of 122 tourists who are interested in participating in ecotourism. However, this may lack generalizability. Future research can take a common set of tourists or a specific destination and execute a longitudinal analysis to better understand the way ecotourism behaviour has evolved over time at a destination. This would in turn help the local people and tour planners to develop tourism packages and events.

Practical implications

As tourists are interested in environmental learning, they are eventually expected to take care of the destination environment in terms of protecting it in every form. This may include reporting of any environment damaging activity, for example, activities that can enhance environmental pollution, etc.

Social implications

Materialism hinders the environmental conservation spree of tourists, when they indulge more in shopping and leisure trips. Hence, for destination planners it is very important to hold complementary events in addition to the main event to highlight the dire need of involving in ecotourism activities.

Originality/value

The study is of significant contribution for researchers and practitioners as it develops the antecedents and consequences of environmental learning behaviour. Furthermore, this study has implications for managers working for sustainability of tourism destinations.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Nur Fadiah Mohd Zawawi and Sazali Abd Wahab

The purpose of this paper is to redefine the concept of organizational sustainability by assimilating corporate spirituality into the concept of the triple bottom line (TBL).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to redefine the concept of organizational sustainability by assimilating corporate spirituality into the concept of the triple bottom line (TBL).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper which presents a newly coined concept for sustainable organizations as a result of a literature study on management and psychology fields. This study explores the concept of competitive advantage, research-based view (RBV) theory, spiritual leadership theory (SLT), positive environmental psychology (PEP) and human resource development (HRD) to fill the void of “soul” as an element in TBL, which is seen as a barrier that prevents organizations from being more holistically sustainable.

Findings

The paper provides new insights into the redefinition of organizational sustainability by introducing quadruple bottom line (QBL), effectively a combination of management and psychological disciplines. This paper also proposes measurements of corporate spirituality, adapted from well-established mental health research, which have been used in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as well.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers are encouraged to test the proposed concept further.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the development of sustainable organizations by offering CEOs and managers corporate spirituality support with which they can make wise decisions when considering environmental, societal and economic perspectives in their operations.

Originality/value

The QBL concept promises to contribute significantly to the growth of more comprehensive, holistic and sustainable organizations, as well as to extend the current literature on organizational sustainability.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Balkrushna Potdar, Tony Garry, John Guthrie and Juergen Gnoth

The purpose of this paper is to explore how interactional justice within a retail context may influence employee organizational commitment and how this may evoke…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how interactional justice within a retail context may influence employee organizational commitment and how this may evoke guardianship behaviors that manifest in shoplifting prevention.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a phenomenological approach conducting semi-structured in-depth interviews with 26 shop-floor employees of two major national supermarket chains in New Zealand.

Findings

The findings suggest that interactional justice in the workplace is important in shaping organizational commitment amongst employees. Additionally, heightened organizational commitment may have a significant effect on employee propensity to engage in shoplifting prevention/guardianship behavior. A conceptual model is developed based on these findings.

Practical implications

Retail managers may promote and exercise interactional justice practices with employees to improve their organizational commitment and consequential shoplifting prevention/guardianship behaviors.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is threefold. First, and from a theoretical perspective, it offers both a conceptual foundation and empirical-based evaluation of interactional justice and its effect on organizational commitment and, specifically, on guardianship/shoplifting prevention behaviors. Second, and from a pragmatic perspective, the conceptual model derived from this research may assist retailers in developing interactional justice strategies that encourage organizational commitment of employees that consequently leads to employees’ guardianship/shoplifting prevention behaviors. Finally, it explores significance and role of employee perceptions of interactional justice, employee workplace attachment and organizational commitment within the context of retail crime prevention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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