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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Kerri Byrd and Jin Su

The purpose of this study is to investigate consumers' perceptions of and consumer behaviour towards apparel labels and environmental, sustainable and social apparel.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate consumers' perceptions of and consumer behaviour towards apparel labels and environmental, sustainable and social apparel.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research was conducted, and empirical data were collected from 399 US consumers.

Findings

Findings indicate that consumers expressed positive sentiments towards apparel sustainability, yet they lacked knowledge about socially and environmental practices within the apparel industry. Overall, it is apparent that the respondents have an interest in environmental and social labelling; but they are not aware of brands that sell these types of garments nor their validity. It was also found that consumers may not have much knowledge regarding environmental, sustainable and social apparel or their meanings.

Originality/value

By surveying the consumers about their perspectives on apparel labels and environmental, sustainable and social apparel, valuable market information was obtained. Sustainably and ethically produced garments are of demand as transparency in the apparel industry grows. Brands looking to become more transparent about their production methods will need to find new ways to reach their target market by accurately labelling products and educating their consumers about these label claims.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Tijun Fan, Yang Song, Huan Cao and Haiyang Xia

The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal environmental quality criteria for a strategic eco-labeling authority with three objectives (i.e. maximizing the aggregate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal environmental quality criteria for a strategic eco-labeling authority with three objectives (i.e. maximizing the aggregate environmental quality, maximizing the industry profit and maximizing the social welfare). Particularly, the authors investigate how the existence of imperfectly informed consumers affects labeling criteria determination and competition among firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A game-theoretic modeling approach was adopted in this paper. A three-stage sequential game was modeled and backward induction was used to solve for a subgame perfect Nash equilibrium. To investigate the impacts of the existence of imperfectly informed consumers, the equilibrium, if all consumers are perfectly informed of the eco-label, was studied as a benchmark.

Findings

A more strict eco-labeling criterion improves revenues for both the labeled and unlabeled firms. It is interesting to find that the eco-labeling criteria to maximize industry profits are stricter than the criteria to maximize social welfare. Moreover, when the fraction of imperfectly informed consumers increases, the eco-labeling criteria to maximize aggregate environmental quality or industry profits will be more strict, while the criteria to maximize the social welfare will be looser.

Originality/value

The authors analyze the equilibrium strategies for firms against the eco-labeling criteria certified by authority with different objectives. The obtained optimal labeling strategies could provide insightful guidelines for the certifying authority to select the best suitable labeling criteria to achieve its goals.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

John Tzilivakis, Andrew Green, Doug Warner, Kate McGeevor and Kathy Lewis

The pressure on the food industry and society as a whole to evolve towards more sustainable production and consumption has increased in recent years. There are a number of…

Abstract

Purpose

The pressure on the food industry and society as a whole to evolve towards more sustainable production and consumption has increased in recent years. There are a number of drivers that can help reduce environmental impacts including legislative instruments, retail marketing and consumer choices and demand. One driver that has received attention recently is the use of product labels, either on a single issue or on multiple issues (using omni‐labelling). The purpose of this paper is to report on a framework that emerged from a wider study exploring effective approaches to environmental labelling of food products.

Design/methodology/approach

Techniques for assessing the environmental impacts of food production were reviewed and a consultation was undertaken with industry and consumer experts to ascertain their views (using multi‐criteria mapping) on the practicality and efficacy of environmental labels.

Findings

The wider study found that although the science is not sufficiently robust to develop an outcome‐based, environmentally broad, omni‐label at this time, there is a role for environmental labelling in conjunction with other initiatives to improve the sustainability of food production and consumption. The framework presented aims to support this role and help improve the practicality and efficacy of environmental labels. It provides a series of interrelated guidelines which provide a basis for developing more effective, robust, credible and practical environmental labels for food.

Practical implications

The framework can be used to design new, or evaluate existing labelling schemes and to identify opportunities for improvements. The process is illustrated with an application to four existing schemes.

Originality/value

Eco‐labelling of food products is gaining interest globally, but there are numerous issues that need to be fully understood in order to develop credible and robust labelling systems.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Clare D'Souza

The growing global public concern for safety and preservation of the environment has given rise to the perception that consumer purchases may be somewhat influenced by…

Abstract

The growing global public concern for safety and preservation of the environment has given rise to the perception that consumer purchases may be somewhat influenced by environmental labels. It suggests that accuracy in label information is relevant so as to allow consumers to make an informed choice. This paper proposes that consumers can be grouped using a matrix of four different environmental positions. The results of these grouping are more likely to provide an effective profile of a green consumer, enabling marketers to segment and target these groups based on a clear understanding of consumer behaviour.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Yohan Bernard, Laurent Bertrandias and Leila Elgaaied-Gambier

To encourage sustainable consumer practices, public policy makers introduce new ecological measures, including mandatory programmes that require companies to provide…

Abstract

Purpose

To encourage sustainable consumer practices, public policy makers introduce new ecological measures, including mandatory programmes that require companies to provide environmental information about their products, even if the information is not flattering. Few academic studies consider the potential impacts of such mandatory eco-labels on consumer behaviour; the purpose of this paper is to seek to identify conditions in which a generalized eco-label in stores might modify consumers’ purchase choices.

Design/methodology/approach

Two quasi-experimental studies (n=333, 126) manipulate environmental information with a simple, traffic light – shaped eco-label. The measures focus on respondents’ choice or purchasing intentions, perceptions of the environmental harmfulness of each product, and individual characteristics (i.e. environmental concern, price sensitivity, familiarity with environmental information about the product category).

Findings

The presence of an eco-label influences consumers’ beliefs about products’ environmental harm and thus choice. The effect of perceived harmfulness on choice is moderated by environmental concern and price sensitivity, though combined effects arise for only one of the two product categories tested (dish soap, not yoghurt). With a third product category (paper towels), Study 2 confirms the influence of familiarity with environmental information.

Research limitations/implications

Familiarity with environmental information accounts for some differences across product categories, but other factors also come into play. These results must be interpreted carefully due to the use of a fictive eco-label.

Originality/value

This paper examines the potential effects of a generalized, mandatory programme. It also addresses the lack of consistent label effectiveness across product categories, with a possible explanation based on perceived familiarity with environmental information.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Elham Rahbar and Nabsiah Abdul Wahid

The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of green marketing tools on consumer's actual purchase behavior in case of Penang (Malaysia).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of green marketing tools on consumer's actual purchase behavior in case of Penang (Malaysia).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out on 250 Chinese, Malay, Indian and other races that represent the Penang population. Factor analysis, Cronbach alpha and multiple regression were used to identify factors impact on Penang consumers actual purchase behavior.

Findings

The result revealed that customer's trust in eco‐label and eco‐brand and their perception of eco‐brand show positive and significant impact on their actual purchase behavior.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical information for green marketers and producers of green products in Malaysia.

Originality/value

This paper offer helpful guideline for government to formulate the green policies such as providing promotional incentives to green products manufacturers and encouraging public to buy products with eco‐label.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Clare D'Souza, Mehdi Taghian and Peter Lamb

Despite research studies indicating strong support for labelling information, uncertainty remains with respect to how labels influence consumers. This paper attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite research studies indicating strong support for labelling information, uncertainty remains with respect to how labels influence consumers. This paper attempts to empirically investigate how consumers who differ in terms of environmentalism respond to labels.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected on an Australian sample using a structured questionnaire administered on the phone using quantum research (CATI) data collection services. A total of 155 questionnaires were completed and used for data analysis. The data were analysed using both descriptive measures and correlations between variables.

Findings

There appears to be a proportion of consumers that find product labels hard to understand. The research found that there are consumers who will buy green products even if they are lower in quality in comparison to alternative products, but would look for environmental information on labels. With respect to price sensitive green consumers, there appears to be a relationship between price sensitivity and “always” reading labels as well as indicating that there is “sufficient” information on product labels to make informed purchase decisions.

Research limitations/implications

It was beyond the scope of the research to account for some of the utilitarian approaches to interpretation or in‐depth comprehension of label information. The sample size of 155, although selected using a probability method, may, to some extent, limit the overall accuracy of the results.

Practical implications

The research offers some important information on different green consumer segments that would alert managers on how best to position environmental labels. Findings such as “Satisfied with labels” correlates with “Labels are accurate”, which suggests that businesses need to provide a clear, accurate and easily legible label design to encourage satisfaction with the accuracy of content and the communication aspects of a label.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to better understanding of green customers purchase intentions and the usefulness of ecological product labels. It offers some insights and assistance to businesses in planning their green product/labelling strategies.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Maria Proto, Ornella Malandrino and Stefania Supino

The aim of this paper is to map and analyse the state of the art of eco‐energy labelling and its potential as a fundamental component in the transition process towards…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to map and analyse the state of the art of eco‐energy labelling and its potential as a fundamental component in the transition process towards eco‐sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed scenario of trends in eco‐energy labelling systems, both on an international and European Union scale are outlined, followed by identification and analysis of the key representative experiences. Subsequently, the main constraints that limit their full potential as a benchmark and tool of improved customer communication for environmental sustainability have been highlighted and critically analysed.

Findings

The full implementation of eco‐energy labelling, as a authentic driving force in sustainability building processes, requires the elimination of the critical factors identified. Therefore, standardisation of benchmarking methodologies, based on improved customer information mechanisms regarding qualitative and quantitative indicators, need to implemented. A strong commitment on the part of all participants involved, to define a multi‐level framework, capable of promoting a recognised international rating scheme in needed.

Practical implications

The most significant implications regard the attempt to classify and coordinate all the information concerning instruments, initiatives, policies and strategies related to eco‐sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper is a contribution towards pinpointing the current fragmented scenario of eco‐energy labelling tools with the aim of re‐conducting them into a coherent and more functional whole.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Aysu Göçer and Bengü Sevil Oflaç

The purpose of this paper is to explore different factors influencing young consumers’ approaches to eco-labeled products in an emerging country, Turkey.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore different factors influencing young consumers’ approaches to eco-labeled products in an emerging country, Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant measures were adapted from the previous literature to assess key constructs on environment and eco-label perceptions. First, an exploratory factor analysis was employed for identifying the key dimensions, and then structural equation modeling was conducted for testing the research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal that the existence of perceived environmental knowledge has an influence on eco-labeled product purchase tendencies, with environmental concern (EC) having a significant mediating effect.

Practical implications

This study contributes to practice by addressing perceptual factors affecting young consumers in emerging markets such as Turkey. This relationship can be utilized to increase the tendency to purchase eco-labeled products to create EC enhancing programs in education in addition to environmental knowledge leveraging ones. Besides, these findings may also be beneficial in eco-labeled product marketing efforts.

Originality/value

This study provides value for the literature by investigating the perception of young consumers in an emerging market specifically, and adopts a more specific eco-label focus, which it integrates with an environmental perspective.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Nur Zulaikha Mohamed Sadom, Farzana Quoquab, Jihad Mohammad and Nazimah Hussin

The environmental impact of excessive use of natural resources such as energy and water in the tourism industry has increased significantly. Thus, it is crucial to…

Abstract

Purpose

The environmental impact of excessive use of natural resources such as energy and water in the tourism industry has increased significantly. Thus, it is crucial to investigate the notion of frugality in this industry. Particularly, this study aims to examine the effect of green marketing strategies (eco-labelling and environmental advertising) and hotel guests’ green attitude towards frugality in the context of the Malaysian hotel industry. Furthermore, the mediating effect of green attitude is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Stimulus-organism-response theory was used to develop the research framework. The data were collected via a self-administered survey questionnaire, which yielded 150 complete and usable responses. A partial least square-structural equation modelling approach was used to validate the proposed model.

Findings

The results of this study revealed that environmental advertising and eco-labelling, directly and indirectly, affect frugality. Moreover, the link between green attitude and frugality also was supported. Furthermore, data supported the mediating effect of green attitude in the relationship between green marketing strategies and frugality.

Practical implications

The findings from this study can benefit hoteliers who are targeting frugal and environmentally conscious consumers. Moreover, the hoteliers will be able to understand the drivers of frugality in the tourism industry. It can assist them to formulate better marketing strategies in attracting and retaining frugal consumers.

Social implications

The findings from this study offer a number of important social implications for society, the local government and the city and tourism council. Particularly, understanding the strategies towards frugality can pave the way towards the formation of a “less consumption” community. Moreover, it will serve as the guideline for designing the green and sustainability campaign for the nation.

Originality/value

This study is among the pioneers to investigate the issue pertaining to frugality in the tourism industry context. This study examines new linkages such as the indirect effect of green marketing strategies towards frugality. Moreover, the mediating effect of green attitude in the relationship between green marketing strategies (eco-labelling and environmental advertising) and frugality is comparatively a new link.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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