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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Irina Farquhar and Alan Sorkin

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized…

Abstract

This study proposes targeted modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD's) Joint Forces Ammunition Logistics information system by implementing the optimized innovative information technology open architecture design and integrating Radio Frequency Identification Device data technologies and real-time optimization and control mechanisms as the critical technology components of the solution. The innovative information technology, which pursues the focused logistics, will be deployed in 36 months at the estimated cost of $568 million in constant dollars. We estimate that the Systems, Applications, Products (SAP)-based enterprise integration solution that the Army currently pursues will cost another $1.5 billion through the year 2014; however, it is unlikely to deliver the intended technical capabilities.

Details

The Value of Innovation: Impact on Health, Life Quality, Safety, and Regulatory Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-551-2

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Mohammad Javad Ershadi, Reza Edrisabadi and Aghileh Shakouri

Project management generally covers many important areas such as cost, quality and time in different industrial settings, but it is deficient in relation to integration of…

Abstract

Purpose

Project management generally covers many important areas such as cost, quality and time in different industrial settings, but it is deficient in relation to integration of health, safety and environmental risks. Poor knowledge of project managers about HSE management necessitates the studying on the mutual effects of HSE and project management. Hence, investigating the impact of project management on health monitoring programs, safety prevention monitoring, environmental monitoring plans and finally the effectiveness of professional health monitoring programs and determining their importance are main objectives of this research. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A model based on structural equations was designed and developed. The constructs of this model are project management, health monitoring and safety prevention monitoring program. Based on the conceptual model, some questionnaires were prepared and distributed among the experts of strategic project management.

Findings

The results of applied structural modeling suggest that project management focuses on each aspect of HSE management, including health monitoring programs, safety prevention monitoring programs, environmental monitoring plans and effectiveness of professional health monitoring programs. HSE management can also be strengthened by empowering project management. Checking fire protection systems, using appropriate techniques to identify contamination and disposal of waste and incorporating techniques for brainstorming or other ideas creation in the group are the most important tasks in HSE-enabled project management frameworks.

Originality/value

Since there is still no strategic alignment model that includes components of project management and HSE management, a model for achieving this goal is vital. This paper elaborates this alignment based on literature and using a field study.

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Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Sonja Petrovic‐Lazarevic

This paper aims to explore the relevance of the application of an environmental management system in creating the image of a good corporate citizen in the Australian

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1959

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relevance of the application of an environmental management system in creating the image of a good corporate citizen in the Australian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The author applied a research method based on data collected from annual reports, corporations' websites and publicly available statistics; and interviews conducted with stakeholders of the leading Australian construction industry corporations.

Findings

The environmental management system has a part in creating the image of a good corporate citizen. Majority of the companies pursues the corporate governance structure that is concerned about healthy environment. None of the companies includes both suppliers and community representatives in the board of directors. There is a different interpretation as to what healthy working environment comprises, and how to sustain a healthy environment of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. The implementation of the occupational, health and safety regulations varies from state of state in Australia.

Practical implications

All companies should pursue the governance structure that ensures the social values of the organization are aligned with those of the community; overall unique stakeholders' understanding of a healthy working environment should support sustainability; equal implementation of occupational, health and safety regulations for each state in Australia could contribute overcoming for much‐needed occupational, health and safety improvement.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is in applying the framework for examining the environmental management system pertinence to the image of defined good corporate citizen. The paper is useful to construction industry practitioners, academics, and government.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Stacey Cahill, Katija Morley and Douglas A. Powell

The project explored the ways in which the topics of organic food and agriculture are discussed in representative North American media outlets in reference to food safety

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5043

Abstract

Purpose

The project explored the ways in which the topics of organic food and agriculture are discussed in representative North American media outlets in reference to food safety, environmental concerns, and human health.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles from five newspapers were collected and coded using the content analysis technique and analyzed for topic, tone, and theme.

Findings

For a six‐year time period, 618 articles on organic food and organic agriculture are analyzed and the prominent topics are found to be genetic engineering, pesticides, and organic farming. Articles with a neutral tone with respect to organic agriculture and food accounted for 41.4 percent of the articles, while positively toned articles garnered 36.9 percent. The themes human health, food safety, and environmental concerns were discussed with positive reference to organic food and agriculture in 81, 50, and 90 percent, respectively, of comments pulled from the articles.

Practical implications

Analysis of these articles over time, between media outlets and by topic allows for understanding of media reporting on the subject and provides insight into the way the public is influenced by news coverage of organic food and agriculture.

Originality/value

Research that analyzes media coverage for how it portrays the topic of organic food and organic agriculture with respect to health, food safety, and environmental concern, and concludes that articles about organic production in the selected time period are seldom negative.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Edward G. Ochieng, Andrew D.F. Price, Charles O. Egbu, Ximing Ruan and Tarila Zuofa

The purpose of this paper was to examine UK shale gas viability. The recent commitment to shale gas exploration in the UK through fracking has given rise to…

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1181

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine UK shale gas viability. The recent commitment to shale gas exploration in the UK through fracking has given rise to well-publicised economic benefits and environmental concerns. There is potential for shale gas exploration in different parts of the UK over the next couple of decades. As argued in this study, if it does, it would transform the energy market and provide long-term energy security at affordable cost.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with senior practitioners and local communities were recorded, transcribed and entered into qualitative research software Nvivo. Validity and reliability were achieved by first assessing the plausibility in terms of already existing knowledge on some of the economic and environmental issues raised by participants.

Findings

Findings from this study suggest that environmental, health and safety risks can be managed effectively provided operational best practices are implemented and monitored by the Health and Safety Executive; Department of Energy, Climate Change; and the Mineral Planning Authorities. Participants further suggested that the integration of shale gas technology will protect consumers against rising energy prices and ensure that government does not get exposed to long-term geopolitical risks.

Practical implications

The present study corroborates the position that environmental, health and safety risks can be managed effectively provided operational best practices are implemented and monitored by the Health and Safety Executive; Department of Energy, Climate Change; and the Mineral Planning Authorities.

Social implications

The present study confirms that the government is committed to ensuring that the nation maximises the opportunity that cost-effective shale gas technology presents, not just investment, cheap energy bills and jobs but providing an energy mix that will underpin the UK long-term economic prosperity.

Originality/value

The present study corroborates the position that environmental, health and safety risks can be managed effectively provided operational best practices are implemented and monitored by the Health and Safety Executive; Department of Energy, Climate Change; and the Mineral Planning Authorities. As shown in this study, the UK has a very strong regulatory regime compared to USA; therefore, environmental, health and safety risks will be very well managed and unlikely to escalate into the crisis being envisioned.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Ross W. Trethewy and Maria Atkinson

Improved safety, health and environment outcomes through better design are about eliminating or minimising risks in the preliminary planning stages of a product. Better…

Abstract

Improved safety, health and environment outcomes through better design are about eliminating or minimising risks in the preliminary planning stages of a product. Better design provides a foundation for improved outcomes in the development, use and maintenance of a product like plant and equipment or a building. Improved outcomes in design require the many stakeholders who contribute to the design process to critically review its safety, health and environment implications. Therefore, the client, or end user, must be actively involved in the review to ensure that operational requirements and maintenance issues, intrinsically known to the client, are considered by other design stakeholders. For example, safety, health and environment implications inherent in the design of a building project may exist in its construction, use, maintenance and demolition, i.e. its complete lifecycle. Similar implications exist for the design of other products such as plant or equipment, e.g. its manufacture through to decommissioning.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Chrysanthus Chukwuma

Environmental issues are diverse and result from different factors and situations. These call for a multidimensional approach to combat environmental perturbation with…

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2418

Abstract

Environmental issues are diverse and result from different factors and situations. These call for a multidimensional approach to combat environmental perturbation with respect to the presenting noxious factors, such as toxic chemical elements and wastes from diverse anthropogenic activities. The continued success of certain environmental programmes in the developed parts of the world and the continuing refinement of our environmental objectives in a contextually designed sustainable development, coupled with significant additional knowledge in environmental planning and management have all led to the decision for a global concerted effort to maintain and sustain our environment for the health and safety of present and future generations. However, these objectives are not strongly undergirded in non‐industrialized parts of the world, and are not wholly supported by the chemical industries and other interests because they lack the will and dedication to realise that economics and environmental management as well as health and safety are inextricably linked.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Nur Khairlida Muhamad Khair, Khai Ern Lee, Mazlin Mokhtar, Choo Ta Goh, Harminder Singh and Pek Wan Chan

The Responsible Care programme was first introduced in Canada in 1985 and now is implemented worldwide as one of the chemical industries' commitments to improve the…

Abstract

Purpose

The Responsible Care programme was first introduced in Canada in 1985 and now is implemented worldwide as one of the chemical industries' commitments to improve the industries' public image as well as their performance in health, safety and environmental aspects. In Malaysia, the Responsible Care programme has been implemented since 1994 with a current total of 148 companies pledged to implement it in their company; however, the effectiveness of the programme remains unknown. Hence, this paper aims to assess the effectiveness of the Responsible Care programme in improving performance in the environment, health and safety in terms of documentation, training, selection processes and stakeholders' engagement for the sustainability of chemical industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to the Responsible Care signatory companies in Malaysia. Of these, a total of 132 member companies either produced or provided services related to chemical products.

Findings

The majority of signatory companies agreed that the Responsible Care programme did improve their performance in the environment, health and safety. Besides that, the signatory companies were also keeping up their commitment to ensuring documentation, training, selection process and stakeholders' engagement run smoothly in line with Responsible Care's mission.

Originality/value

After more than two decades of implementation in Malaysia, it is important to assess the Responsible Care programme's effectiveness. As an increasing number of chemical firms, without good management, it will possibly pose a danger to the environment and human health and safety. Through assessment, advances in Responsible Care management practices will considerably increase programme effectiveness in terms of environmental health and safety.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

P. O’Donovan and M. McCarthy

The consumer of today places increased importance on food safety, environmental and health issues and quality, hence some are willing to purchase organic meat. Evaluation…

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5779

Abstract

The consumer of today places increased importance on food safety, environmental and health issues and quality, hence some are willing to purchase organic meat. Evaluation models used in previous organic food research have identified variables such as health consciousness, environmental concern, animal welfare and income as important determinants of organic food choice. The objective of this research was to examine Irish consumer perceptions of organic meat. A questionnaire was completed by 250 respondents, which were representative of the Irish population. Three groups of consumers were identified. Respondents who purchased or had intention to purchase organic meat placed higher levels of importance on food safety when purchasing meat, compared to those with no intention to purchase organic meat. Furthermore, purchasers of organic meat were more concerned about their health than non‐purchasers. Purchasers of organic meat also believed that organic meat was superior to conventional meat in terms of quality, safety, labelling, production methods and value. Availability and the price of organic meat were the key deterrents to the purchase of organic meat. Higher socio‐economic groups were more willing to purchase organic meat. Increasing awareness of food safety and pollution issues are important determinants in the purchase of organic meat; but securing a consistent supply of organic meat is paramount to ensuring growth in this sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah and Justice Mensah

The aim of this paper is to set a baseline understanding of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) concept amongst the different stakeholders in the mining industry in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to set a baseline understanding of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) concept amongst the different stakeholders in the mining industry in Ghana and further examine their appreciation of issues of occupational health and safety. It explored the integration of issues of health and safety of employees into the broader CSR agenda through a stakeholder analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study population comprised various stakeholders operating in the mining industry of Ghana. The purposive sampling technique was used in the selection of the organisations/institutions that participated in the study. In all, 35 people were interviewed, and the interview data were analysed using thematic-content analysis.

Findings

The findings provide an insight into how the various stakeholders in the mining industry in Ghana understood the CSR concept and how they went about practising it. Appreciation of issues health and safety by the various stakeholders also received considerable attention. All the stakeholders equated CSR to community relations. In all the cases, respondents referred to the local community as their focal point when discussing the concept.

Originality/value

On the basis of this paper, it appears that mining companies in Ghana have looked upon the concept as a strategic challenge and not as a series of high-profile initiatives aimed at ensuring a responsible business practice. This paper adds to the literature by providing a perspective on how CSR associates with health and safety.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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