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Abstract

Details

Designing Environments for People with Dementia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-974-8

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Article

Ehsan Naderi, Iman Naderi and Bimal Balakrishnan

This study aims to investigate the combined effects of product design and environment congruence on consumers’ aesthetic, affective and behavioral responses.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the combined effects of product design and environment congruence on consumers’ aesthetic, affective and behavioral responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Two lab experiments with a 2 (high-level design cues vs low-level design cues) × 2 (congruent environment vs non-congruent environment) between-subjects design were conducted to test the hypotheses. The experimental stimuli (product: digital camera; environment: product display in a retail environment) were presented in a 3D simulation environment using a large TV (Experiment 1) and a stereoscopic virtual reality headset.

Findings

The results support the notion that product design cues elicit more positive aesthetic and affective responses. Environment congruence, on the other hand, plays a moderating role; product design cues elicit more favorable consumer responses in a congruent environment. In contrast, no such effect was found in a non-congruent environment.

Practical implications

Creating a congruent environment is only effective for well-designed products. In contrast, for products with low-level design elements, the congruence of promotional environment is not instrumental and may not elicit more favorable responses. Hence, such products can simply be presented in a generic display, especially considering the significant costs associated with designing, building and setting up a congruent display.

Originality/value

Despite the empirical findings supporting the significant role of product design and environment congruence on consumers’ perceptual and behavioral responses, there is a paucity of research on the combined effect of these two factors. The present investigation is an attempt to fill this gap and challenges the generalizations made in previous research suggesting that a product’s environment must be aligned with the design elements embedded in the product.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Hannah Kira Wilson and Alison Cotgrave

The purpose of this paper is to identify personality types between different university disciplines, and to establish whether there are differing requirements in the design

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify personality types between different university disciplines, and to establish whether there are differing requirements in the design of physical learning environment. Also to identify features of the learning environment that can support a sense of community. This paper seeks to investigate the relationship between student’s personality and preferences of features of the built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative questionnaires were distributed in three university disciplines based on the variables personality, elements of the physical learning environment and features that could support a sense of community.

Findings

The analysis revealed that there are differences in preferred features within the physical learning environment for the three university disciplines within a large UK-based university. It can also be seen that there are differences in personality profiles between these three university disciplines. Features of the environment that could support a sense of community have been also identified.

Research limitations/implications

Those who are responsible for the design and refurbishment of higher education institutions may find this research useful to improve the facilities for students. To support the development of appropriate physical learning spaces through the understanding of students’ requirements.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new perspective on how the development of higher education facilities can be designed to increase student experience by identifying specific features of the physical learning environment students prefer.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article

Steve Greenland and Peter McGoldrick

Effective retail environments are crucial for customer acquisition and retention. However, the environment behaviour relationship is complex and producing the ideal design

Abstract

Purpose

Effective retail environments are crucial for customer acquisition and retention. However, the environment behaviour relationship is complex and producing the ideal design is difficult. Whilst substantial research reports the affects of specific design components, studies investigating the impact of multiple store environment stimuli upon consumer perceptions, attitudes and behaviour are limited.

Design/methodology/approach

The environment response model provides a conceptual framework for examining the impact of retail settings upon cognitive, affective and cognitive consumer responses. Its applicability is tested in retail banking environments. Research empirically links survey data to a design audit and reveals that more modern branch styles and features are statistically more likely to induce favourable customer reaction.

Findings

Research empirically links survey data to a design audit and reveals that more modern branch styles and features are statistically more likely to induce favourable customer reaction. This finding in some ways helps justify expenditure on refurbishment. However, features having a positive impact in one respect may also be negative in another, highlighting the complexity of the environment behaviour relationship and the difficulties facing retail designers.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research is the relatively small branch sample size.

Originality/value

Contributes to the literature on the impact of retail settings on consumer responses.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part

Matt Bower

The ability for learners to interact online via their avatars in a 3-D simulation space means that virtual worlds afford a host of educational opportunities not offered by…

Abstract

The ability for learners to interact online via their avatars in a 3-D simulation space means that virtual worlds afford a host of educational opportunities not offered by other learning technology platforms, but their use also raises several pertinent issues that warrant consideration. This chapter reviews the educational use of virtual worlds from a design perspective. Virtual-world definitions are explored, along with their key educational characteristics. Different virtual-world environments are briefly contrasted, including Second Life, Active Worlds, Open Sim, and Minecraft. A wide variety of virtual-world uses in schools and universities are examined so as to understand their versatility. Key educational benefits of virtual worlds are distilled from the literature, such as the ability to facilitate 3-D simulations, role-plays, construction tasks, and immersive learning. Emergent issues surrounding the use of virtual worlds are also analyzed, including cognitive load, safety, and representational fidelity. One higher education and one school level vignette are provided in order to offer more detailed insight into the use of virtual worlds in practice. Recommendations for learning design and implementation are presented, based on the thematic analysis of contemporary virtual-worlds research.

Details

Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-183-4

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Book part

Lilia Pavlovsky

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and…

Abstract

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and reflect the cultural life within that organization. This is a study of how the “landscape” of a public library (“Library X”), as an information retrieval system, relates to the values of the people who created it. The efforts here are geared towards understanding the physical instantiation of institutional culture and, more specifically, institutional values as they are reflected through the artifact.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-338-9

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Article

Mohammad Gharipour and Amber L. Trout

Our lived experiences are complex, dynamic and increasingly connected locally and globally through virtual realities that call for an evolution and responsiveness from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Our lived experiences are complex, dynamic and increasingly connected locally and globally through virtual realities that call for an evolution and responsiveness from the field of architecture education. To ensure future built environments are designed to nurture healing and health, this paper aims to address a critical need in architecture education to integrate knowledge of health and social-behavioral disciplines in students' course work. The authors will outline the process of preparing a new multidisciplinary course on health and the built environment (HBE) at the School of Architecture and Planning at Morgan State University in Baltimore, USA, as an effort to challenge the barriers of discipline-specific pathways to learning in the field of architecture.

Design/methodology/approach

The central question is how to develop an active learning pedagogy to foster a multidisciplinary learning environment focused on the “practice” (how to) of human-design-oriented approaches to improve the capability of built and natural environments to promote health and healing. The course intentionally centered on the real-life experiences of students to ground their new understanding of health and well-being fields. The course proposal went through an extensive peer-review process of reviewers from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and other departments at Morgan State University to ensure a balance between health- and architecture-specific curricula with a transdisciplinary approach to understanding complex health issues.

Findings

This paper shows the effectiveness of tools and techniques applied in the course to challenge architectural students to integrate various health and behavior perspectives in their designs and to apply health and healing principals to their current and future design projects.

Originality/value

While there are courses in American universities that offer a traditional introduction to health concerns related to the built environment, there is limited focus on the perspective of the design field approach to improve health and healing outcomes.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article

Anastase Adonis and Khalil Drira

This paper aims to provide a methodological road for the next generation of e‐learning environments.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a methodological road for the next generation of e‐learning environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers a survey of recent publications (1995‐2002), which aim to provide practical and theoretical indications and advice, which are coupled with practical experimentations.

Findings

The paper provides road‐mapping elements, indicating the impact on services and systems to be expected by this design approach.

Research limitations/implications

The survey is based on a selection of sources and it is not exhaustive. The methodology experiments that are used for argumentation are based on the authors’ platform.

Practical implications

The paper presents a useful source of knowledge for researchers and advanced students.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a road for advanced e‐learning systems, and can help researchers and those in industry who desire to introduce and understand the design methodological context of advanced e‐learning systems.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article

Chuba Onyechi Odum

– The purpose of this paper is to present a study assessing residents’ satisfaction with the integration of natural environment in public housing designs in Enugu urban, Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a study assessing residents’ satisfaction with the integration of natural environment in public housing designs in Enugu urban, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed qualitative and quantitative strategies. Personal observations and one-on-one interviews were conducted where necessary. A survey of 898 households residing in two main prevalent residential building typologies, systematically selected based on quota of their existence in seven public housing estates, was conducted, with a questionnaire as the key data collection instrument. A five-point Likert scale was used in measuring residents’ level of satisfaction of three key housing environment sub-components. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Findings

Residents expressed dissatisfaction with overall housing estate environment in terms of naturalness in the estate landscaping and availability of green areas, and also with immediate dwelling unit environments in terms open spaces and naturalness in external finishes. Many of the residents, however, claimed to be indifferent about the extent of response of layout designs to natural factors, and street layout concepts to climatic influences. This reveals a high level of apathy of residents to their estates designs.

Research limitations/implications

Collecting relevant data from the government agency that are the providers of the public housing studied was a herculean task, as there was no existing organized data bank. Consequently, the researcher depended more on extensive field work. In addition to the above, getting the questionnaire respondents to agree to participate in the study was another major challenge, as they were not used to participating in such studies before the current study.

Social implications

Findings from the study imply that residents’ are adaptable to whatever housing environment they are provided with; therefore, therapeutic housing environment, if provided, would enhance healthy living for public housing residents in Nigeria.

Originality/value

This work is a pioneering effort at evaluating public housing environment in the study area in relation to residents’ perception.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article

Bengi Yurtsever and Cigdem Polatoğlu

Learning is an internalization process that depends on individual components. This study focuses on the problematic of learning in architectural design education process…

Abstract

Learning is an internalization process that depends on individual components. This study focuses on the problematic of learning in architectural design education process and examines its components. The relationship between learning and perception and how it can be handled in the architectural environment is discussed. Answers are searched on the axis of “individual, experience, perception” and especially is focused the concept of “filtering”. The learning environment in the architectural design studio is seen as a cultural environment where all actors share their experiences. It is thought that these variables should be brought to the forefront in order not to lose the originality, with so many variables connected with these cultural actors. In this context, it is aimed to examine the relation between filtering and authenticity in the process of debating the problem of learning in working. The discussion was conducted through a blended learning environment that is supposed to support the aforementioned relationship.

The study is based on the constructing grounded theory as a qualitative research pattern. The dynamic structure that can be empowered by the field experience of the selected research pattern has been a driving force in the study. Temporary hypotheses were identified with the preliminary problems and conceptual samples that were expected to be discussed, and then an experience environment was created that could generate data for the study. Then an experience environment was created that could generate data for the work. The implications of the observations, the open-ended questionnaires and the process of making the interviews were evaluated by descriptive analysis. With this approach, problems can be observed on an individual basis; and some of the problems that were grounded were brought into questionable positions with the architectural design studio.

Details

Open House International, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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