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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1984

James L. Locke

What can go wrong during the order entry process of a manufacturer? A system solution to many of these problems is discussed that combines hardware, software and…

Abstract

What can go wrong during the order entry process of a manufacturer? A system solution to many of these problems is discussed that combines hardware, software and networking technology in that solution. The system solution includes the networking of data entered into the new “briefcase” portable micros, personal computers, or terminals at field sales locations. The benefits which accrue to the company implementing the solution are highlighted. In conclusion, the article discusses how a manufacturer can optimise the use of data captured in the order entry process for better sales and marketing control.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 84 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Javier Rodríguez‐Pinto, Jesús Gutiérrez‐Cillán and Ana I. Rodríguez‐Escudero

This paper aims to examine whether order and scale of market entry influence a new product's market and financial performance, and how marketing and R&D resources…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether order and scale of market entry influence a new product's market and financial performance, and how marketing and R&D resources strengthen or weaken these effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a mail survey, data were collected on a sample of 136 product launches by Spanish manufacturing firms. A moderated hierarchical regression analysis enabled the assessment of the relevance of order and scale as well as their interactions with marketing and R&D resources to explain a product's competitive position. Moreover, a mediation analysis allowed us to determine whether market entry strategy (indirectly) affects financial performance.

Findings

The analyses show that pioneering firms and those entering the market with a full‐scale launch achieve advantages in terms of competitive position, and that this variable mediates the relationship of order and scale with profitability. The empirical results also reveal that such advantages are conditioned by the availability of marketing and R&D resources.

Practical implications

The decisions regarding order and scale of market entry are contingent. Managers involved in the planning of a new product launch should be knowledgeable about their firm's resources and capabilities before determining when and how to enter the market.

Originality/value

Many papers study the effects of order‐of‐entry on market share, but other dimensions of a new product launch strategy, such as scale, have largely been ignored. The research examines the effects of both variables on competitive position and profitability. This is also one of the first studies that explores the moderating effect exerted by resources and capabilities in the launch strategy‐performance relationship.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Frank Tian Xie, Naveen Donthu and Wesley J. Johnston

This paper aims to present a new framework that describes the relationship among market entry order and timing, the advantages accruing to first-movers and late-movers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a new framework that describes the relationship among market entry order and timing, the advantages accruing to first-movers and late-movers, entry timing premium (ETP), marketing strategy and enduring market performance of the firms. The framework, empirically tested using data from 241 business executives, expands extant research into new territory beyond first- and late-mover advantages in an attempt to reconcile a few streams of research in the area and provides an entry related, strategic assessment tool (ETP) for the managers. Contribution to marketing strategy theory and managerial implications are also presented.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included informants in a firm’s strategic business unit who were the most familiar with a new product’s commercial launch, market condition at launch, competitor offerings, marketing activities and capabilities and eventual integration into or withdrawal from the product’s portfolio. Therefore, for the survey, the study targeted chief executive officers, vice presidents of marketing or sales, product or sales managers, general managers and regional managers. Both preference bias (Narus, 1984) and survivor biases among the respondents were addressed.

Findings

The research result of this study reveals two very significant aspects of marketing and marketing strategies. First, the importance of financial, pricing and cost strategies further attests to the fiercely competitive nature of the global market today and the tendency for firms to commoditize most products and services. An effective financial and pricing strategy, coupled with a higher level of ETP, is capable of leading a firm to initial market success in the product-market in which it competes. Both ETP (a positional advantage and resource of the firm) and financial and pricing strategies (a deliberate strategic decision of the management) are important to achieve this goal.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in several ways. The effects of entry order and timing on market performance could be dependent on the types of industries and types of product categories involved. However, as the hypotheses were well supported, the “industry specific” factors would provide “fine-tuning” in the future study. Second, the nature of the product (goods or services) may also present varying effects on the relationship studied (for differences between manufacturing and service firms in pioneering advantages, see Song et al., 1999). Services’ intangible nature, difficulty in protecting property rights, high involvement of boundary-spanning employees and customers, high reliance on delivery and quality, and ease of imitation may alter the proposed relationships in the model and the moderating effects. Third, although this study used a “retrospective” protocol approach in the data collection by encouraging respondents to recall market, product and business information, this study is not longitudinal. Lack of longitudinal data in any study involving strategic planning, strategy execution and the long-term effects is no doubt a weakness. In addition, due to peculiarity and complexity with regard to regulation and other aspects in pharmaceutical and other industries, the theory might be limited to a certain extent.

Practical implications

In all, the integrated framework contributes to the understanding of the intricate issues surrounding first-mover advantage, late-mover advantage, entry order and timing and the role of marketing strategy. The framework provides practitioners guidance as to when to enter a product-market to gain advantageous positions and how to maintain that advantage. Firms that use a deliberate late-mover strategy could also benefit from the research finding in mapping out their strategic courses of action.

Originality/value

This study believes that the halo effect surrounding first-mover advantage may have obscured the visions of some researchers and managers, and the pursuit of a silver bullet has led to frenzied interests in becoming a “first-mover” or a deliberate “late-mover”. The theoretical framework, which is substantiated by empirical testing, invalidates the long-held claim that entry of a particular kind (first-movers or late-movers) yields any unique competitive advantage. It is a firms’ careful selection of marketing strategies and careful execution of the strategies through effective operational tactics that would lead to enduring competitive advantage, under an adequate level of ETP.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Johanna Kirjavainen, Saku J. Mäkinen and Ozgur Dedehayir

In addition to pioneering, empirical work on entry order increasingly addresses fast followers and laggards and the potential advantages they are able to capture. There is…

Abstract

Purpose

In addition to pioneering, empirical work on entry order increasingly addresses fast followers and laggards and the potential advantages they are able to capture. There is also a growing consensus in the academia, that current measures of firm performance used in the entry order literature to study these advantages are inadequate. This study analyzes the relationship between entry order and customer evaluations, which, depicting the performance of the firm's products in the market, are used as a proxy for firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is set in the digital camera industry, analyzing entries into each new technology level, in terms of the sensor resolution of compact and bridge cameras. The complete dataset consisted of 1,816 digital camera models introduced between January 1996 and December 2017. The data are analyzed using hierarchical multiple linear regression.

Findings

The study finds evidence of early-mover advantage for the compact product category. In the compact camera consumer market, both first-movers and fast followers outperform late movers. Furthermore, the difference in performance in comparison to laggards is greater for first-movers than for fast followers. However, in the bridge category which consists of a more heterogeneous set of products, no significant entry-order effects are detected.

Originality/value

The results clearly indicate that there exists an early mover advantage. Furthermore, the results are not consistent across different product categories within an industry; hence, caution needs to be exercised when analyzing industry dynamics and entry order effects. Finally, our novel conceptualization of firm performance measured as online customer evaluation add new opportunities to investigate firm success

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Young‐Ryeol Park, Jeoung Yul Lee and Sunghoon Hong

The objective of this paper is to determine whether international entryorder strategies by Korean chaebols affect the exit of their foreign subsidiaries.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to determine whether international entryorder strategies by Korean chaebols affect the exit of their foreign subsidiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of a set of 61 parent firms and their 500 foreign subsidiaries. The sample includes 27 Korean business groups, called chaebols, and spans 51 markets, during the period from 1999 to 2004. The study employs resource‐ and knowledge‐based views, and is based on the Cox's proportional hazard model.

Findings

This study leads to two main findings: in the context of Korean business groups, latecomers in international markets have greater survival rates than pioneers do because latecomers have stronger resource commitments; and, nonetheless, if chaebol pioneers have greater competitive advantages than chaebol latecomers, the pioneers' subsidiaries have better survival rates than do those of latecomers.

Originality/value

The analysis advances order‐of‐entry research by exploring the international order‐of‐entry strategies of chaebol multinationals and their impact on international exit and the interrelationship between the order‐of‐entry and core competencies of chaebol multinationals.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Frank Alpert, Michael Kamins, Tomoaki Sakano, Naoto Onzo and John Graham

One potential source of pioneer brand advantage is retail buyers’ preference for pioneer brands. A model of pioneer brand advantage with retailers developed in the USA was…

Abstract

One potential source of pioneer brand advantage is retail buyers’ preference for pioneer brands. A model of pioneer brand advantage with retailers developed in the USA was tested in Japan, as a replication and cross‐cultural extension. This provides the first empirical study of Japanese retail buyer beliefs, attitude, and behavior toward new offerings, and the first direct statistical comparison of US and Japanese retail buying behavior in the marketing literature. Similarities and differences in pioneer brand advantage with retailers between Japan and the USA are discussed. Results from a survey of buyers from Japan’s largest supermarket chains suggest that pioneer brand advantage is about as strong for them as for their US counterparts, though for somewhat different reasons. The survey’s results were analyzed in two ways (through a multi‐attribute attitude model and a PLS causal model), with results that complement and corroborate one another. Data were standardized to deal with potential extreme response style bias.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Tom Housel and Valery Kanevsky

These phone company managers believe they have designed a practical methodology that will allow any company to estimate which reengineering projects have the most…

Abstract

These phone company managers believe they have designed a practical methodology that will allow any company to estimate which reengineering projects have the most potential to add value. Their innovation could provide businesses with the first reliable means of predicting or auditing the return on investment in individual component processes of reengineering projects.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Laura K. Siebeneck and Thomas J. Cova

Return-entry is understudied in the disaster science literature. This paper provides an overview of the return-entry process, identifies key factors informing the…

Abstract

Purpose

Return-entry is understudied in the disaster science literature. This paper provides an overview of the return-entry process, identifies key factors informing the selection of return strategy, proposes a simple classification of return strategies and offers ideas for advancing research in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores previous research and recent return-entry processes in order to advance understanding of strategies emergency managers employ and decisions they make when managing the return movement of evacuees home after disasters.

Findings

The paper offers new insights into the management of the return movement, proposes primary factors considered when developing return strategies and offers a framework for the selection of strategies utilized by emergency managers.

Originality/value

Given that return-entry is a burgeoning area of inquiry in disaster science, this paper advances knowledge and understanding of return-entry movements after disasters and outlines key research needs.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

E. MICHAEL KEEN

Reports a laboratory experiment in which verbalized tape‐recorded searches on five printed subject indexes reveal something of the linguistic processing that took place…

Abstract

Reports a laboratory experiment in which verbalized tape‐recorded searches on five printed subject indexes reveal something of the linguistic processing that took place. Some 20% of the entries examined were changed grammatically, by word order change or function word supply, according to the linguistic form of the index concerned. Extracts from the search transcriptions are given, and the search processing modes of seeking, scanning, and screening are discussed.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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