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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2016

Rafael Pedrosa

This program is directed to everyone, no matter the scholar level. However, each team must have at least one student or former student that must be part of one of the…

Abstract

Methodology/approach

This program is directed to everyone, no matter the scholar level. However, each team must have at least one student or former student that must be part of one of the project partners (Polytechnic Institutes and non-integrated high schools).

The Poliempreende is a program focused on the promotion and development of the entrepreneurship among the polytechnics’ academic community. It consists of an ideas contest based in a great program of training sessions included on the activities plan. These sessions are oriented for ideation and construction of business plans. Considering the contest, it has a regional and a national phase. In both regional and national levels, the best three projects are chosen and earn prizes.

Originality/value

The project focuses on the cross-fertilization of knowledge area with the consequent enrichment of experiences, practices, and results, in particular by encouraging the setting up of multidisciplinary teams, with the goal to instill the spirit of initiative in the participants, the entrepreneurial willingness to create their own businesses and generate jobs, exploring the practical and professional character of their training.

Implications

The Poliempreende is also a project with a great regional impact, not only because the Polytechnics have a strong influence in the region where they are implemented, involving several entities, individualities, and local sponsors, but also because this program is open to any business idea, from engineering to hospitality, passing from health and culture, which permits a closer application and answer to local needs, anticipating the legacy that Carnegie Mellon/Portugal Program wants to leave to us (Foundation for Science and Technology (2009)).

Purpose

This program intends to provide participants with the necessary skills for the creation of business initiatives, to promote, and to encourage the entrepreneurship, in an approach of economic and social action through self-employment.

Supplementary materials

Power-point presentations and support documents are available only for the participants in the training sessions.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Gerrit Wolf

A business school within a research university can improve the startup process and success on and near campus. The purpose of this paper is to show the mutual benefits to…

Abstract

Purpose

A business school within a research university can improve the startup process and success on and near campus. The purpose of this paper is to show the mutual benefits to business and science students in learning about startups and to helping startups grow. The mutual benefit comes from the student understanding and the startup managing the complementary roles of inventor, entrepreneur, and investor.

Design/methodology/approach

A case analysis using participant observation, interviews, and document review of the Innovation Center in the College of Business at the Stony Brook University tracks the development of the Center’s educational, research, and consulting activity with engineering departments, incubators, and other support services on campus.

Findings

Inventor, investor, and entrepreneurship roles were supported and coordinated by science and business faculties and students in the university. This process, described in specific courses and programs for MBAs and BBAs, includes the contribution of business academic faculty, serial entrepreneur mentors and the scientists in partner organizations that also support startups inside and outside the university. The number of business plans written by students grew from 10 to 100 a year, startups begun from 1 to 5 a year, and established startups renewed grew from 10 a year to 20 a year over five year period.

Practical implications

This case can be useful to research universities and business schools that want to improve the startup process and success.

Originality/value

This study shows that the role of students in the business school in a research university is to transform inventive ideas from the sciences to innovations in the market place through entrepreneurial activity.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

M. Emilia Bianco, Margaret Lombe and Mara Bolis

The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of women’s entrepreneurship to bring about greater gender equality. Understanding women’s entrepreneurship as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of women’s entrepreneurship to bring about greater gender equality. Understanding women’s entrepreneurship as a gendered process (Bird and Brush, 2002), the study presents the challenges encountered by women entrepreneurs as a result of gender ideologies. It documents structural barriers, discriminatory interactions and oppressive gender scripts and their effects on the women and their businesses. Acknowledging women’s possibilities for agency and resistance, the study analyzes how women entrepreneurs conform, contest or negotiate gender scripts and constraints, and looks at the consequences of these actions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from elements of social interactionism and the doing and undoing gender theories, the authors use a feminist theoretic framework to guide analysis of qualitative data from two focus groups conducted with 19 women entrepreneurs in Colombia.

Findings

Gender ideologies were manifested in the forms of interrelated structural barriers that restricted women entrepreneurs’ access to resources. Social interactions represented spaces in which gender ideologies were reinforced, but also spaces women used to produce changes through resistance and accommodation strategies. Entrepreneurship was associated with positive changes toward greater gender equality, although negative consequences were reported.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the limited sample, more studies across countries may be needed for the consolidation of a generalizable theoretical framework.

Originality/value

This study presents a feminist theoretic framework in dialogue with the lived experiences of women entrepreneurs. It observes the processes of change toward gender equality embedded in business development.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Fidelma Ashe and Lorna Treanor

The purpose of this paper is to offer a perspective to further the understanding of gender entrepreneurship. This paper considers the situatedness of the gendered…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a perspective to further the understanding of gender entrepreneurship. This paper considers the situatedness of the gendered entrepreneur within diverse international contexts marked by different constitutions of gender identities and networks of power, both within the context of contributions within this special issue but also more broadly within the field of gender and entrepreneurship research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a feminist perspective and analyse the different framings of identity within gender and entrepreneurship literature and their contributions to our understandings of the concepts of both power and gendered identities.

Findings

The paper finds that power and identity are configured in different contexts in ways that open arenas for future analysis.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of considering masculinities within gender and entrepreneurship research offering support for further analyses of entrepreneurial masculinities by examining two studies that expose entrepreneurial masculinities as shifting subjectivities influenced by men's social power, but also by interactions between men and women and broader cultural contexts and transitions. In so doing, it contributes to the research agenda in relation to gender and entrepreneurship in different contexts.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2018

Matthias Pepin and Etienne St-Jean

Many countries around the world have now introduced entrepreneurship into their curricula and educational practices, starting at the elementary school level. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Many countries around the world have now introduced entrepreneurship into their curricula and educational practices, starting at the elementary school level. However, recent studies show the relative (un)effectiveness of K-12 enterprise education on diverse learning outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to report on a research aimed at assessing the impacts of enterprise education on students’ entrepreneurial attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a quasi-experiment between May and June 2017 to assess the entrepreneurial potential of students at Elementary Cycle 3 (10–12 years) in Quebec, Canada. Relying on attitude theory, the authors used Athayde’s Attitudes toward Enterprise for Young People test, which assesses students’ entrepreneurial potential through four entrepreneurial attitudes (leadership, creativity, achievement and personal control). The experimental group consisted of 11 classes which had conducted an entrepreneurial project during the 2016–2017 school year (n = 208 students), while the 7 classes of the control group had not (n=151 students).

Findings

At first glance, data showed no difference between the two groups. Further investigation showed that private and Freinet (public) schools’ students, both from the control group, show significantly higher leadership scores than those of the experimental group. In-depth analyses also show that increasing the number of entrepreneurial projects significantly impacted three of the four attitudes assessed, although negligibly.

Research limitations/implications

Taken together, those results question the relevance of single entrepreneurial activities in developing students’ entrepreneurial attitudes. They also suggest the positive impact of a progressive, constructivist pedagogy in developing such entrepreneurial attitudes. Moreover, the paper raises several factors likely to impact students’ entrepreneurial attitudes for further research.

Originality/value

K-12 enterprise education remains an understudied context, largely crossed by unproven statements. This research contributes to understand and give direction to educational initiatives targeting the development of young students’ entrepreneurial attitudes.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Lorena del Carmen Álvarez-Castañón and Pilar Arroyo

The chapter aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the entrepreneurship training programmes implemented in public and private universities in the entity of Guanajuato

Abstract

The chapter aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the entrepreneurship training programmes implemented in public and private universities in the entity of Guanajuato, located in the central part of Mexico. A simple random sample of 449 students who participated in these programmes was collected. The survey data were statistically analysed to determine if the participants’ capability of agency and the influence of their closest social groups – university, family and regional socioenvironmental – increase the entrepreneurial intentions of university students. Results showed that the capability of agency was directly improved after participation in the programme, while entrepreneurial intentions were indirectly influenced by the institutional and business environment.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2007

Jeannette A. Colyvas and Walter W. Powell

We examine the origins, acceptance, and spread of academic entrepreneurship in the biomedical field at Stanford, a university that championed efforts at translating basic…

Abstract

We examine the origins, acceptance, and spread of academic entrepreneurship in the biomedical field at Stanford, a university that championed efforts at translating basic science into commercial application. With multiple data sources from 1970 to 2000, we analyze how entrepreneurship became institutionalized, stressing the distinction between factors that promoted such activity and those that sustained it. We address individual attributes, work contexts, and research networks, discerning the multiple influences that supported the commercialization of basic research and contributed to a new academic identity. We demonstrate how entrepreneurship expands from an uncommon undertaking to a venerated practice.

Details

The Sociology of Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-498-0

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Robert Smith

This chapter introduces the two main topics of ‘entrepreneurial policing’ and ‘criminal entrepreneurship’ and begins in Section 1.1 by considering the concept and scope of…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the two main topics of ‘entrepreneurial policing’ and ‘criminal entrepreneurship’ and begins in Section 1.1 by considering the concept and scope of entrepreneurial policing around which this monograph is organised. Its definition and ontological development are considered. Thereafter, the author briefly discuss what entrepreneurship is (and is not) and set out examples of entrepreneurship of interest to policing, including – ‘Corporate’ and ‘Team’ Entrepreneurship, ‘Intrapreneurship’, ‘Social Entrepreneurship and Animateurship’, ‘Civic Entrepreneurship’, and ‘Public Service Entrepreneurship’. The author then discusses why entrepreneurship is of critical importance to the police service and discuss worked examples. Having developed a basic understanding of the power and utility of entrepreneurship, then in more detail what the term entrepreneurial policing means and how it evolved in practice and in the academic literature are considered. In Section 1.2, the foundations of entrepreneurial policing considering its ontological and epistemological development from ‘New Public Management’ to ‘New Entrepreneurialism’ and also the influence of the merging literatures of ‘Criminal Entrepreneurship’ and ‘Entrepreneurial Leadership’ are critically examined. In Section 1.3, our consideration to include a more nuanced understanding of the what is referred to as the ‘Entrepreneurship–Policing Nexus’ including consideration of the influence of dyslexia on policing and crime and the power of the ‘Entrepreneurial’ and ‘Gangster’ dreams on entrepreneurial motivation and propensity are expanded. In Section 1.4, an attempt is made to identify who the stakeholders of this new policing philosophy are? Finally, in Section 1.5, the chapter takeaway points which both articulates and confirms the inherent importance of entrepreneurship in policing and criminal contexts are discussed and detailed.

Details

Entrepreneurship in Policing and Criminal Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-056-6

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Colin C. Williams

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the literature that has sought to deconstruct this ideologically driven depiction by demonstrating how the existent enterprise…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the literature that has sought to deconstruct this ideologically driven depiction by demonstrating how the existent enterprise culture in post-Soviet spaces not only challenges the depiction of the entrepreneur as a heroic icon of the legitimate capitalist culture but also opens up the feasibility of alternative futures beyond legitimate profit-driven capitalism. The starting point of this paper is that the enterprise culture is often viewed as inextricably related to the legitimate capitalist economy.

Design/methodology/approach

To unravel the nature of the enterprise culture in lived practice, this paper reports a 2006 survey involving face-to-face interviews with 90 entrepreneurs in Moscow.

Findings

Only 7 per cent of the Muscovite entrepreneurs surveyed pursue profit-driven legitimate entrepreneurship. The vast majority adopts social goals to varying degrees and operates wholly or partially in the informal economy. The outcome is to challenge the depiction of an enterprise culture and capitalism as inextricably inter-related and to open up entrepreneurship and enterprise culture in this post-Soviet space to re-signification as demonstrative of the feasibility of imagining and enacting alternative futures beyond capitalism.

Research limitations/implications

These findings are tentative, as they are based on a small-scale study of just one post-socialist city. Further research is now required to analyse whether the lived practices of entrepreneurship and enterprise cultures are similarly diverse in other post-Soviet spaces as well as beyond.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to evaluate critically the assumption that enterprise culture is a part of the legitimate capitalist economy in post-Soviet spaces.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Ulla Hytti and Jarna Heinonen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the identity work of postgraduate students participating in an entrepreneurship training programme for life sciences. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the identity work of postgraduate students participating in an entrepreneurship training programme for life sciences. The paper aims to analyse what kind of entrepreneurial identities are constructed and in what ways in the context of the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on learning diaries and other written materials harvested from seven participants. Drawing on a social constructivist analysis, the materials were analysed by drawing attention to the kind of identities created, the contradictions that surfaced and how those were resolved in the written materials.

Findings

Two distinct entrepreneurial identities were constructed by the participants: the heroic and the humane. The first is the stereotypical role prototype that the participants experiment with. For the male participants this seems acceptable and normal. If they were in possession of more information, knowledge and skills they could identify with this heroic entrepreneurial identity. However, the female participants constructed an alternative identity; the humane entrepreneur running a low-tech firm with modest business goals or acting as an intrapreneur in an existing organisation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider entrepreneurship programmes as arenas for (gendered) identity work.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship training should not only provide the participants with business knowledge and skills but facilitate their entrepreneurial identity work.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to understanding entrepreneurship education as a context for entrepreneurial identity construction and extends the understanding of the expected outcomes of entrepreneurship education programmes. The study demonstrates how entrepreneurial identity construction processes in the context of entrepreneurship training are gendered.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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