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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Abhijeet Biswas and Rohit Kumar Verma

The intent to start an entrepreneurial venture is predisposed by certain personality traits. The study aims to analyze the impact of various identified personality traits

Abstract

Purpose

The intent to start an entrepreneurial venture is predisposed by certain personality traits. The study aims to analyze the impact of various identified personality traits and entrepreneurial education on entrepreneurial intentions of management students.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study were gathered from 440 students of top 5 management institutes in India. The study used a cross-sectional design and structured questionnaire based on seven-point Likert scale and was administered employing a purposive sampling method. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was utilized to validate posited hypotheses in the study.

Findings

The study discerns that apart from agreeableness dimension of personality traits, all remaining identified dimensions along with entrepreneurial education had a significant influence on entrepreneurial intentions of management students with need for achievement emerging as the most important enabler. Conscientiousness was the major dimension among big five personality traits bearing a positive influence, while neuroticism registered a negative impact on entrepreneurial intentions. In addition, results bespeak that entrepreneurial education partially mediates the effect of need for achievement, locus of control and innovativeness on entrepreneurial intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The compendious model proffered in the study might be helpful for students, educators, consultants, financial institutions and policymakers in appreciating the gravity of underlying personality traits.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of research on big five personality traits and entrepreneurial education as enablers of entrepreneurial intentions. The study attempts to integrate big five personality traits model with dimensions of need for achievement, locus of control, innovativeness and entrepreneurial education for management students in India.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Syed Abidur Rahman, Mirza Mohammad Didarul Alam, Golam Mostafa Khan and Rowan Elodie Kennedy

This paper examines the predictive role of personality traits on the entrepreneurial bricolage behaviour of female entrepreneurs in a resource-constrained setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the predictive role of personality traits on the entrepreneurial bricolage behaviour of female entrepreneurs in a resource-constrained setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a structured survey questionnaire from female entrepreneurs owning and operating micro-small firms. The analysis and hypotheses testing were performed adopting SEM-PLS3.0 software.

Findings

The results showed that all dimensions of the Big Five personality traits significantly influence entrepreneurial bricolage. In addition, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and intellect were found to be the most important traits in female entrepreneurs for bricolage behaviour.

Practical implications

The results can help provide a better understanding of the linkages between entrepreneurial traits and bricolage. Development agencies may take up this result to ensure the appropriate social inclusion by supporting female entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

To the authors' best knowledge, this paper is the first empirical study that has investigated the relationship between personality traits and entrepreneurial bricolage.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Reginald L. Tucker, Graham H. Lowman and Louis D. Marino

Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic traits are often viewed as negative or undesirable personality traits. However, recent research demonstrates that individuals…

Abstract

Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic traits are often viewed as negative or undesirable personality traits. However, recent research demonstrates that individuals with these traits possess qualities that may be personally beneficial within the business contexts. In this chapter, we conceptualize a balanced perspective of these traits throughout the entrepreneurial process (opportunity recognition, opportunity evaluation, and opportunity exploitation) and discuss human resources management strategies that can be employed to enhance the benefits, or minimize the challenges, associated with Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic traits. Specifically, we propose that Machiavellian qualities are most beneficial in the evaluation stage of entrepreneurship, and Machiavellian, narcissistic, and psychopathic qualities are beneficial in the exploitation stage of entrepreneurship.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-263-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Jun Yan

This empirical study examined links between entrepreneurial personality traits and perception of new venture opportunity in a sample of 207 respondents. Four…

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4755

Abstract

This empirical study examined links between entrepreneurial personality traits and perception of new venture opportunity in a sample of 207 respondents. Four entrepreneurial personality traits were included to predict respondents℉ perception of new venture opportunity. They are (1) achievement motivation, (2) locus of control, (3) risk propensity, and (4) proactivity.The results of multiple regression analysis show that three of the four entrepreneurial personality traits‐locus of control, risk propensity, and proactivity‐related significantly to perception of new venture opportunity in expected directions. Among the three personality traits, proactivity was found to have the strongest influence over entrepreneurial perception. No significant relationship was found between achievement motivation and perception of new venture opportunity. Among six control variables, only work experience was found to influence perception of new venture opportunity. This study explored links between entrepreneurial personalities and cognition and its results suggest that a combination of trait and cognition approaches contributes to a better understanding of entrepreneurial decision-making process. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

L. Louw, S.M. van Eeden, J.K. Bosch and D.J.L. Venter

Developments in the global and national economies as well as the labour market, have made it necessary that more attention be paid to entrepreneurship and the updating of…

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3410

Abstract

Developments in the global and national economies as well as the labour market, have made it necessary that more attention be paid to entrepreneurship and the updating of curricula presented by tertiary institutions. For this purpose reliable and valid information is required. The primary objectives of this article are to report on the levels of students’ entrepreneurial traits, to establish whether these traits are interrelated, and to determine the extent of the impact that demographic variables have on these entrepreneurial traits. A convenience sampling method (n = 1,215) was used. The best developed entrepreneurial traits observed included: “Competing against self‐imposed standards”, “Self‐confidence” and “Dealing with Failure”. Statistically significant relationships were also identified between the entrepreneurial traits of students and the tertiary institution attended, and students’ gender, race and age.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Mohammad Suleiman Awwad and Rana Mohammad Najati Al-Aseer

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the Big Five personality traits on the entrepreneurial intentions of undergrad university students in Jordan. It…

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1248

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the Big Five personality traits on the entrepreneurial intentions of undergrad university students in Jordan. It further investigates the mediating role of entrepreneurial alertness.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey method was conducted with a convenience sample of Jordanian university students. A total of 323 valid questionnaires were received and analyzed. A structural equation modeling with partial least square (PLS) is used to analyze data.

Findings

Results revealed that conscientiousness, openness and alertness were associated with entrepreneurial intention. Extraversion and openness were associated with alertness, while agreeableness and neuroticism were unrelated to either outcome. Finally, alertness mediates the relationship between extraversion and openness with entrepreneurial intention.

Originality/value

There is a lack of previous studies investigating the relationship between the Big Five personality traits and students’ entrepreneurial intentions in Jordan, particularly the role of mediating variables in this relationship. This study is considered the first one that examined the mediating role of entrepreneurial alertness in the relationship between personality traits and entrepreneurial intentions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2071-1395

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Hina Munir, Cai Jianfeng and Sidra Ramzan

The purpose of this paper is to extend the existing literature on entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) by employing the integrated model of personality traits and the theory…

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3982

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the existing literature on entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) by employing the integrated model of personality traits and the theory of planned behavior (TPB). It further examines the mediating role of TPB’s dimensions between personality traits and EIs of final-year university students in two diverse economies: China and Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a survey method for data collection, administered both in electronic and paper form. The authors use structural equation modeling and the partial least square (PLS) method on a sample of 1,016 students and present PLS path modeling, mediation analysis and multigroup analysis.

Findings

Results reveal several differences regarding personality traits and TPB on EIs across the two countries. The impact of TPB was positive and significant in both countries; however, TPB demonstrated more explaining power in China’s student sample. Using three personality traits (risk-taking propensity, proactive personality and internal locus of control) as antecedents to TPB, the results reveal a stronger influence of personality traits among Chinese students. The mediation of three dimensions of TPB also revealed differences between country samples.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to compare and contrast the differences between EIs in terms of personality and the determinants of planned behavior among university students in two diverse economies. The integrated model is original, supports both TPB and personality factors and provides a valuable perspective through its findings on two culturally diverse Asian countries. By applying the model in two different cultures, this study distinguishes the results for the two economies from those conducted in other economies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2018

Wencang Zhou, Xi Yang, Yuanqing Li and Yanli Zhang

By using a nontraditional configuration approach, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of personality on entrepreneurial intention and success. Previous…

Abstract

Purpose

By using a nontraditional configuration approach, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of personality on entrepreneurial intention and success. Previous research has focused on why individuals become entrepreneurs and why some are more successful than others. However, most studies have investigated only single factors or primary personality traits. The current study investigates not only the strength of the personality-entrepreneurship link, but also clarifies the nature of the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two independent samples and an innovative regression-based pattern recognition procedure, the study investigates whether the nature of the personality-entrepreneurship relationship is driven by individuals’ absolute trait levels or by their idiosyncratic configuration of personality traits. The non-entrepreneur sample consisted of 225 business students in Eastern China, specializing in a variety of business subjects. The entrepreneur sample consisted of 120 business owners in a university entrepreneurial park in Eastern China.

Findings

Results support hypotheses that the two different types of entrepreneurship criteria are predicted by different personality profile effects. Entrepreneurial intentions are driven by individuals’ personality patterns (peaks and valleys in profiles). In contrast, entrepreneurial success is driven by personality levels (individuals’ relative standing on personality traits compared to other entrepreneurs).

Research limitations/implications

The findings enrich the understanding of entrepreneurial personality. The more significant contribution of the present study was that it differentiated between personality profile pattern and level effects and investigated whether the nature of the personality-entrepreneurship relationship is driven by individuals’ absolute trait levels (i.e. how high or low they score compared to others), or by their idiosyncratic configuration of personality traits (i.e. their strengths and weaknesses).

Practical implications

The findings of this study may help entrepreneurs to figure out how to be successful running their own businesses, if they are not graced with a personality pattern that is not favorable to entrepreneurship. In addition, these findings can help entrepreneurship educators to understand how best to train entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The adoption of both person-centered approach and process perspective of entrepreneurship allowed this study to make major contributions to entrepreneurial personality research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Rachael Smith, Robin Bell and Helen Watts

– This paper aims to identify personality trait differences between social and traditional entrepreneurs.

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4791

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify personality trait differences between social and traditional entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The Durham Business School’s General Enterprise Tendencies (GET) test was chosen to measure an individual’s entrepreneurial personality. The choice was based on the test’s established use within industry and its ability to measure traits most commonly considered “entrepreneurial” by the extant literature. The test was adapted for this study and distributed to both social and traditional entrepreneurs. The results were then statistically analysed to test for significant differences between the two groups.

Findings

It was found that social entrepreneurs exhibited statistically significantly higher levels of creativity, risk-taking and need for autonomy than traditional entrepreneurs. The results were then discussed critically in light of the literature.

Research limitations/implications

The modest sample size was the main limitation of the research. In addition, the sample set was fairly culturally homogeneous. It has been recommended that an additional test be carried out with a larger sample size, consisting of a more culturally diverse range of participants, to improve the generalisation of the findings.

Originality/value

This research provides new insights into personality trait differences between social and traditional entrepreneurs and is particularly useful to those with an interest in entrepreneurial orientation and those interested in the identification and development of social entrepreneurs.

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Faruk Şahin, Hande Karadağ and Büşra Tuncer

The literature considers the big five personality traits and entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) to be important individual-level factors that determine entrepreneurial

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9112

Abstract

Purpose

The literature considers the big five personality traits and entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) to be important individual-level factors that determine entrepreneurial intention. However, little is known about the profiles of personal characteristics of individuals who express a high level of entrepreneurial intention. The purpose of this paper is to carry out a comparative analysis of personal characteristics that contribute to new business start-up intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data from two samples, fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) was performed to extract patterns of personal characteristics (i.e. the big five personality traits and ESE) that impact entrepreneurial intention.

Findings

The outcomes of the analyses demonstrate that a high level of entrepreneurial intention can be realized through multiple configurations of the big five personality traits and ESE.

Practical implications

This paper can inform practice on entrepreneurship education. Specifically, the paper includes implications for the development of ESE, and for understanding multiple configurations of personal characteristics that lead to a high level of entrepreneurial intention.

Originality/value

This paper addresses an identified need to understand how personal characteristics operate conjointly and among individuals.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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