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Article

Ruby Sangar and Santosh Rangnekar

It has been believed that entrepreneurship involves a lot of risk nowadays, yet it is assumed that not being entrepreneurial can be a bigger risk. Enhancement in…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been believed that entrepreneurship involves a lot of risk nowadays, yet it is assumed that not being entrepreneurial can be a bigger risk. Enhancement in entrepreneurial behaviour can improve performance of the individual as well as that of the organization. This paper aims to propose a conceptual model that empirically examines the relationship of role satisfaction and its dimensions with entrepreneurial behaviour in an Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Three hundred and thirty three executives/managers from many organizations in India were approached. Cronbach's α, factor analysis, correlation and regression analyses were applied to check the research hypotheses.

Findings

It was found that most of the variables in the study were having significant relationship. All the hypotheses were supported. Furthermore, achievement, influence, control and affiliation were found to be important predictors of entrepreneurial behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This paper would help researchers and practitioners to work on these variables in some other cultures and nations also.

Practical implications

Improvement in role satisfaction will enhance the entrepreneurial behaviour among Indian business executives/managers which will improve the overall performance of the organization.

Originality/value

It is an innovative attempt to utilize role satisfaction to improve entrepreneurial behaviour in an Indian framework.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

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Article

James C. Ryan, Syed A. Tipu and Rachid M. Zeffane

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the need for achievement (N‐ach) and entrepreneurial potential of young adults in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the need for achievement (N‐ach) and entrepreneurial potential of young adults in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of university business students (n=305) took part in the study. The data were collected using a tailored questionnaire designed to assess respondents' level of N‐ach motivation and their relative potential to pursue entrepreneurial activities.

Findings

The results revealed a strong correlation between N‐ach and entrepreneurial potential among the participants. Analysis of differences across gender and nationality was also conducted, revealing lower levels of N‐ach for UAE national participants, and higher levels of N‐ach among women participants.

Practical implications

Results support the view that achievement motivation is a potentially important factor in explaining entrepreneurial success. It also highlights a potential problem for the UAE economy and society in addressing the relatively low levels of N‐ach among UAE nationals, especially males.

Originality/value

Despite a professed desire on the part of the UAE Government to diversify the economy and promote entrepreneurial activity among UAE nationals, little research has been done on the nature of important variables such as N‐ach and entrepreneurial potential in the region. This research addresses a key gap in the literature by exploring this relationship.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

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Article

Ven Sriram, Tigineh Mersha and Lanny Herron

Successful new venture creation may be one solution to many of the economic problems that affect the mostly minority populations that live in US inner cities. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Successful new venture creation may be one solution to many of the economic problems that affect the mostly minority populations that live in US inner cities. This paper sets out to develop a model and a set of research questions that may help increase understanding of African‐American entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an integrated review of the literature from the USA and Europe pertaining to minority entrepreneurial behavior and achievement. It identifies challenges faced by African‐American urban entrepreneurs and suggests a set of interventions that can enhance entrepreneurial success in the inner cities. The paper then poses a set of research questions with a particular focus on African‐Americans and presents an integrative model that can serve as a framework to examine these questions.

Findings

The model posits that motivation and skills drive entrepreneurial behavior and that availability of resources has a moderating effect on both entrepreneurial behavior and achievement. In addition to explaining entrepreneurship in general, the proposed model also suggests that specific variables may work differently for different subcultures.

Practical implications

If this model is supported by empirical evidence, it will have significant implications for formulating appropriate interventions that would enable the successful start‐up and management of new business ventures in different subcultures. It will be of value to cities in the USA, Europe and elsewhere that have large minority populations, and can better inform programs that impart entrepreneurial skills and training.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the growing literature that recognizes that the drivers of entrepreneurial pursuit are frequently embedded in culture. While this has been studied cross‐nationally, few studies examine this aspect within a heterogeneous society.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article

Emmeline de Pillis and Kathleen K. Reardon

The purpose of this paper is to examine persuasion and personality variables as predictors of entrepreneurial intention in a cross‐cultural sample.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine persuasion and personality variables as predictors of entrepreneurial intention in a cross‐cultural sample.

Design/methodology/approach

Undergraduates in the USA and the Republic of Ireland completed measures of personal efficacy, achievement motivation, ambiguity tolerance, attitudes toward entrepreneurship, and entrepreneurial intention.

Findings

The results suggest that the decision to become an entrepreneur comes about differently in different cultures. US participants appear to perceive entrepreneurship as a societally sanctioned and appropriate outlet for their achievement motivation. While achievement motivation correlated with entrepreneurial intention for the US participants, this result did not obtain for the Irish subjects. In both cultures, those who have come to believe that being an entrepreneur is consistent with their self‐image showed strong entrepreneurial intention independent of their other beliefs about entrepreneurship. This study suggests that recollections of positive interpersonal and mass media messages about entrepreneurship encourage entrepreneurial intention – but only for US participants. Other factors discussed in this report appear to mitigate the effect of such recollections for the Irish.

Research limitations/implications

This study is part of a larger research program that includes following up on these participants at a later date. With longitudinal data, we will be able to track the relationship between stated entrepreneurial intention and later business startup.

Originality/value

This investigation compares factors influencing entrepreneurial intention in the USA and Ireland.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article

Leonidas A. Zampetakis, Konstantinos Kafetsios, Nancy Bouranta, Todd Dewett and Vassilis S. Moustakis

This paper aims to propose and empirically test a theoretical model positing relationships among emotional intelligence (EI), creativity, proactivity, and attitudes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose and empirically test a theoretical model positing relationships among emotional intelligence (EI), creativity, proactivity, and attitudes towards entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial intent.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was completed by a random sample (n=280) of business, engineering and science students across three Greek universities. Results were based on structural equation modelling analysis.

Findings

Results provide strong support for the proposition that students' creativity and proactivity fully mediate the positive effect of trait EI on attitudes towards entrepreneurship. Attitudes towards entrepreneurship fully mediated the effects of creativity and proactivity on entrepreneurial intent.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that EI is positively related to three important antecedents of entrepreneurial intentions and provides the literature with another important piece of the puzzle concerning entrepreneurial motivation. This evidence adds to the academic literatures on entrepreneurship and trait EI, and offers several practical implications for entrepreneurship education.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article

Pi-Shen Seet, Noel Lindsay and Fredric Kropp

This study presents and validates a theoretical model linking individual characteristics of the founding or lead innovative entrepreneur of a start-up venture – the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study presents and validates a theoretical model linking individual characteristics of the founding or lead innovative entrepreneur of a start-up venture – the entrepreneur's values, entrepreneurial attitudes and entrepreneurial self-efficacy – to the firm's entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and market orientation (MO) and, ultimately, to firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a survey on a stratified random sample of founders of early-stage South Australian micro- and small enterprises with a response rate of 24% (N = 204). Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the model.

Findings

The study found that there is a significant relationship between the individual lead entrepreneur and firm strategies developed in early-stage firms in explaining firm performance. It also found that internal values are positively related to entrepreneurial attitude. Entrepreneurial attitude is positively related to entrepreneurial self-efficacy and EO innovativeness. In turn, entrepreneurial self-efficacy is related to innovativeness, proactiveness and risk-taking. The proactiveness dimension of EO and entrepreneurial attitude is related to MO. Entrepreneurial self-efficacy, innovativeness and MO are related to firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to entrepreneurial ventures in South Australia and may lack generalisability in other states and countries.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the understanding of the heterogeneity within self-employed individuals, in particular among innovative entrepreneurs, by expanding insights regarding antecedents and consequences of the entrepreneurial process. It develops insights into the links of individual-level constructs with firm-level constructs to develop a more meaningful understanding of new venture creation and performance. It enhances our knowledge of the heterogeneity within the group of self-employed by exploring the individual entrepreneurial antecedents of performance in early-stage firms.

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Article

Alison Morrison

Aims to provide an insight relative to the motivations of individuals entering into entrepreneurship. Analysis is made of the respective biographies of a female and a male…

Abstract

Aims to provide an insight relative to the motivations of individuals entering into entrepreneurship. Analysis is made of the respective biographies of a female and a male immigrant entrepreneur who chose to participate in the domain of commercial hospitality, albeit separated by 68 years. A model of entrepreneurial motivation first presented by Naffziger guides this analysis. The model is attractive in that it combines wider environmental forces with the intrinsic motivations and social context of the entrepreneurs. It is concluded that it may be possible to isolate an independent common set of “out‐of‐time” factors associated with entrepreneurial motivation, that encompass the personal domain of the entrepreneur (characteristics, environment, goals). These combine with dependent “in‐time” factors (business idea, business environment) arising from the economic and social trends of the day to present a complex amalgam of events, characteristics and traits. It is proposed that entrepreneurs are “travellers through time”. Times may change, but the motivation, emotion, drive, purpose and “mania” of entrepreneurs remain constant.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

Tobias Pret and Aviel Cogan

The purpose of this paper is to review and critique the extant body of literature on artisan entrepreneurship and to develop a research agenda for future studies based on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and critique the extant body of literature on artisan entrepreneurship and to develop a research agenda for future studies based on the identified trends and themes.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review (SLR) was undertaken across 96 journals ranked by the Association of Business Schools. The initial search yielded 86 papers. Further scrutiny of these studies led to the development of exclusion criteria, resulting in a refined list of 32 articles which advance understanding of artisan entrepreneurship. Using an open coding approach, this SLR then identified seven core themes and 16 sub-themes which the extant literature examines.

Findings

This SLR finds that artisan entrepreneurship research contributes to understanding of entrepreneurial behaviour, context, motivation, development, resources, diversity and classification. It provides timely insights into coopetition practices, the reciprocal relationship between place and entrepreneurship and the coexistence of social and economic goals. It also reveals characteristics which facilitate venture development, discovers the mutability of various forms of capital, highlights the necessity of studying diverse experiences and identifies benefits and limits of typologies. Main elements of the resulting research agenda include calls for more quantitative research, further attention to context and more holistic treatment of a wider variety of stories.

Originality/value

This paper presents the first SLR of craft and artisan entrepreneurship research. It not only identifies, analyses and critiques the main streams in the literature, therefore providing an overview of the state of the field, but also highlights areas where this scholarship contributes to understanding of entrepreneurship and upon which future research can build. Artisan entrepreneurship is thus established as worthy of investigation in its own right and as an appropriate context in which to explore entrepreneurial processes. Furthermore, this SLR presents an agenda for future research to advance understanding of artisan entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article

Rony Germon, Séverine Leloarne, Myriam Razgallah, Imen Safraou and Adnane Maalaoui

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role that sexual orientation can play in entrepreneurial intention.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role that sexual orientation can play in entrepreneurial intention.

Design/methodology/approach

By conducting a survey on a sample of 654 individuals and, among them, 266 LGB people in the Paris region (France), and using linear regressions, The authors test the impact of sexual orientation on the antecedents of entrepreneurial intention, as defined by Ajzen (1991), and on entrepreneurial intention.

Findings

The study reveals that LGB people express a higher entrepreneurial intention than non-LGB people. The study also reveals that sexual orientation positively impacts the three antecedents of entrepreneurial intention, namely attitudes, perceived behavioral control and subjective norms.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in a specific context: an LGB-friendly region and among a population of well-educated people. One could also have investigated the impact of femininity and masculinity on entrepreneurial intention among this population.

Practical implications

LGB people adopt entrepreneurial cognition different to that of other minorities, which tends to confirm that LGB entrepreneurial norms and beliefs are not really the same as those of the dominant culture. The study sheds light on the key antecedent one has to work on to increase the entrepreneurial intention of LGB people.

Originality/value

This study reveals that LGB people, even in friendly LGB geographical areas, are still suffering from a lack of self-esteem. The study also confirms that creating any new venture, as job creation process, is perceived as to be the alternative to difficult employment.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article

Rachael Smith, Robin Bell and Helen Watts

– This paper aims to identify personality trait differences between social and traditional entrepreneurs.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify personality trait differences between social and traditional entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The Durham Business School’s General Enterprise Tendencies (GET) test was chosen to measure an individual’s entrepreneurial personality. The choice was based on the test’s established use within industry and its ability to measure traits most commonly considered “entrepreneurial” by the extant literature. The test was adapted for this study and distributed to both social and traditional entrepreneurs. The results were then statistically analysed to test for significant differences between the two groups.

Findings

It was found that social entrepreneurs exhibited statistically significantly higher levels of creativity, risk-taking and need for autonomy than traditional entrepreneurs. The results were then discussed critically in light of the literature.

Research limitations/implications

The modest sample size was the main limitation of the research. In addition, the sample set was fairly culturally homogeneous. It has been recommended that an additional test be carried out with a larger sample size, consisting of a more culturally diverse range of participants, to improve the generalisation of the findings.

Originality/value

This research provides new insights into personality trait differences between social and traditional entrepreneurs and is particularly useful to those with an interest in entrepreneurial orientation and those interested in the identification and development of social entrepreneurs.

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