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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Nicholas Theodorakopoulos, Carmel McGowan, David Bennett, Nada Kakabadse and Catarina Figueira

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate analytically how entrepreneurial action as learning relating to diversifying into technical clothing – i.e. a high-value…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate analytically how entrepreneurial action as learning relating to diversifying into technical clothing – i.e. a high-value manufacturing sector – can take place. This is particularly relevant to recent discussion and debate in academic and policy-making circles concerning the survival of the clothing manufacture industry in developed industrialised countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using situated learning theory (SLT) as the major analytical lens, this case study examines an episode of entrepreneurial action relating to diversification into a high-value manufacturing sector. It is considered on instrumentality grounds, revealing wider tendencies in the management of knowledge and capabilities requisite for effective entrepreneurial action of this kind.

Findings

Boundary events, brokers, boundary objects, membership structures and inclusive participation that addresses power asymmetries are found to be crucial organisational design elements, enabling the development of inter- and intracommunal capacities. These together constitute a dynamic learning capability, which underpins entrepreneurial action, such as diversification into high-value manufacturing sectors.

Originality/value

Through a refinement of SLT in the context of entrepreneurial action, the paper contributes to an advancement of a substantive theory of managing technological knowledge and capabilities for effective diversification into high-value manufacturing sectors.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Leni Beukema and Jorge Carrillo

In this introduction restructuring of work is presented as an ongoing, locally situated process in which actors within work organizations play an important role. Central…

Abstract

In this introduction restructuring of work is presented as an ongoing, locally situated process in which actors within work organizations play an important role. Central themes of this process are the increasing importance of the cultural within the economical sphere, the different organizational options of organizations, new tensions in labor relations and the local consequences of continuous spatial relocation of labor. Before introducing the different contributions to the volume, attention is paid to methodological implications for research on the increasing interrelations of the global and local within processes of work restructuring.

Details

Globalism/Localism at Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-229-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

John P. Conbere and Alla Heorhiadi

The purpose of this case study is to examine a new entrepreneurial business in Kiev, Ukraine. The focus is the difference between employees' espoused values and their deep…

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1215

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to examine a new entrepreneurial business in Kiev, Ukraine. The focus is the difference between employees' espoused values and their deep beliefs, which leads to conflict among and within employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A theory is proposed about the interaction of espoused values, theory‐in‐use and cultural beliefs. Observation and interviews with staff demonstrated that there was great effort to live out the new espoused values, and also that cultural beliefs hindered this effort.

Findings

The proposed theory was supported. The role of the leader in modeling the espoused values was seen to be important for the employees' ability to live up to the new espoused values, and deserves further research.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include: replication of the study is needed before findings can safely be generalized. The capital city effect means the findings may apply to organizations in Kiev and not other Ukrainian cities.

Practical implications

The implication of the study is that employees' theories‐in‐use may undermine change, even when employees affirm the change, and the modeling of the leader might be essential in order for employees to change their theories‐in‐use. This may apply in organizations beyond Ukraine.

Originality/value

Understanding the impact of theory‐in‐use shaped by Ukrainian culture might be valuable for non‐Ukrainians doing business in Ukraine.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Levent Altinay and Catherine L. Wang

The purpose of this paper is to address the cultural challenges of gaining and maintaining qualitative research access into ethnic small firms. In particular, it evaluates…

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1200

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the cultural challenges of gaining and maintaining qualitative research access into ethnic small firms. In particular, it evaluates the influence of cultural affinity – between researchers and business owners – on gaining and maintaining access into ethnic minority owned firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reflects on the experiences of facilitating and maintaining research access into a sample of 258 small Turkish and Chinese ethnic minority businesses in London.

Findings

This paper study illustrates that researchers need to demonstrate cultural awareness to ethnic business owners and understand the socio‐cultural environment in which their firms operate in order to be able to gain and maintain research access.

Research limitations/implications

Data collection is limited to Turkish and Chinese ethnic minority owned businesses in London, and other ethnic entrepreneurs are excluded. Therefore, care should be taken in making generalisations from the sample.

Practical implications

This paper identifies a number of important skills which can be exploited in negotiating and gaining research access. These are communication, interpersonal and cultural awareness skills.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a neglected area in the research process, namely research access, which has important implications for the type of data collected, sampling and data collection techniques. The paper thus identifies “research access” as an important element of research design.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Philip R. Harris and Dorothy L. Harris

The rapid emergence of the microelectronics revolution has led to an upsurge of new business enterprises in the information technology field. The entrepreneurial skills…

Abstract

The rapid emergence of the microelectronics revolution has led to an upsurge of new business enterprises in the information technology field. The entrepreneurial skills required to turn a take‐off venture into a successful business enterprise are substantially different from those required to manage established business organisations; entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship and the management of innovation are inextricably linked and will be a dominant feature of commercial life over the next decade. Identifying, understanding and applying such skills require the immediate attention of managers of any enterprise.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Eleanor Shaw

This paper presents some of the findings to emerge from a qualitative study of social enterprise in the UK. The findings discussed in this paper refer to the marketing…

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8017

Abstract

This paper presents some of the findings to emerge from a qualitative study of social enterprise in the UK. The findings discussed in this paper refer to the marketing activities of social enterprises and consider the extent to which these can be described as “entrepreneurial”. This discussion suggests that while social enterprises do engage in entrepreneurial marketing, the local embeddedness of their activities, their not‐for‐profit orientation and challenges posed by social exclusion impact on their marketing activities.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Margaret Benefiel

The purpose of this paper is to address a number of significant field‐shaping questions faced by scholars in the burgeoning new field of spirituality in organizations. How…

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872

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address a number of significant field‐shaping questions faced by scholars in the burgeoning new field of spirituality in organizations. How should spirituality in organizations be defined? What correlation can be established between an organization's spirituality and its financial performance? What research methods are most appropriate for this work – quantitative, qualitative, a combination of the two, or entirely new methods? The answers given to these questions will determine the shape of this new field and the direction research will take over the next several decades.

Design/methodology/approach

These questions are addressed by mapping the terrain of current spirituality in organizations scholarship, examining trails being blazed by pioneers venturing into this new territory, and then broadening the boundaries.

Findings

This article articulates academic challenges facing scholars who wish to continue to broaden the boundaries of research into spirituality in organizations, and suggests some ways forward.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into the pioneers who are blazing trails in the spirituality and organizations terrain.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 33 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Nick Williams and Robert Huggins

Government intervention has increasingly identified deprived communities as a key focus for enterprise support. The purpose of this paper is to examine attitudes and…

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932

Abstract

Purpose

Government intervention has increasingly identified deprived communities as a key focus for enterprise support. The purpose of this paper is to examine attitudes and perceptions to enterprise support in a deprived community in the UK city of Leeds.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 142 entrepreneurs and potential entrepreneurs, and 18 follow‐up in‐depth interviews with entrepreneurs, were conducted with people living in the study area. The survey examined the entrepreneurial activity of members of the community, and usage of enterprise support.

Findings

The paper finds that certain forms of enterprise support in deprived communities may actually discourage entrepreneurship. Also, where entrepreneurial ventures are supported they tend to operate in activities relating to generic trades with low entry barriers, with many enterprises having little actual or perceived requirement for external support, with it being likely that these would have been established with or without support.

Research limitations/implications

A potential limitation of the study is that it is restricted to a case study of deprived communities in one particular city.

Practical implications

Increased investment in the supply of enterprise support may not lead to increased levels of entrepreneurship, with support that aims to engage with people who have never considered starting a business, or do not have the skills required to launch and grow a venture, is unlikely to be cost‐effective given their low growth potential.

Originality/value

The results of the research are potentially applicable to other deprived communities, and provide lessons for policy relating to the promotion of entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Mario Joseph Miranda and László Kónya

Retailers who stay open for longer times may be overestimating demand during these times and might struggle to turn round a profit by operating extended trading hours…

Abstract

Purpose

Retailers who stay open for longer times may be overestimating demand during these times and might struggle to turn round a profit by operating extended trading hours. This paper aims to analyse the frequency and time at which consumers make unscheduled store visits in order to suggest ways that retailers might use to attract more patronage in this mode of grocery shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology includes administration of a structured questionnaire among randomly selected shoppers, exiting two supermarkets across a major Australian city. The survey seeks information about various aspects of shopping behaviour, in a range of contexts and within selected demographics. Two econometric models aimed at predicting frequencies and times of the day that shoppers do unscheduled shopping are constructed.

Findings

The study identifies shopping profiles of consumers who are inclined to make unscheduled visits to the grocers.

Research limitations/implications

The investigation does not discriminate between idiosyncratic unscheduled purchase behaviour during extended trading times on weekdays and weekends. Greater understanding of the extenuating factors that encourage unscheduled shopping on Sundays will give an added dimension to the policy issues debate on Sunday trading.

Practical implications

Retailers can attempt to condition their patrons to expand purchases during the time the store keeps its doors open longer.

Originality/value

The findings could impel retailers during the extended trading times, to take affirmative actions to make customers' unscheduled visits more experiential, and help the stores achieve higher customer outlays.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Johanne Rønnow Olsen, Hanne Harmsen and Alan Friis

The objective of this paper is to develop a framework, based on existing literature, for factors influencing the formation and success of product development alliances…

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2389

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to develop a framework, based on existing literature, for factors influencing the formation and success of product development alliances, and relate this specifically to the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study of a product development alliance, with four partners and an interview survey, with 19 key informants in the Danish food industry.

Findings

The nature of the differences between the developed framework for product development alliances in the food industry and theory on alliances in general, indeed seem to rest in the chosen specific context. Companies in the food industry are not forced by external conditions to enter into product development alliances. Therefore, compared to other industries, motivations have to be stronger or risks smaller for them to form such interorganisational relationships. However, once formed, results indicate that success factors are rather universal across industries and types of alliances.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should explore the findings further, both within the food industry context, as well as more broadly in terms of geography and industry.

Practical implications

Managers obtain a tool for planning and refining their innovation strategy and actions regarding product development alliances.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the presently limited literature on product development alliances, specifically in the food industry context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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