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Article

William T. Rupp and Alan D. Smith

Any solution that will solve the problem the entertainment industry is currently facing will need to address the underlying theme in the decline of self‐policing and…

Abstract

Any solution that will solve the problem the entertainment industry is currently facing will need to address the underlying theme in the decline of self‐policing and morally acceptable behavior in terms of intellectual rights. It has become a norm to download music off the Internet and transfer them onto compact discs (CDs) without compensating the artist who created the music or the firms that created, packaged, promoted, and distributed the music materials. Within the repackaged application will be technology that will allow the consumer to sample the product as well as make a purchase instantly over the Internet. This will benefit the entertainment industry in several ways: expanding the number of distribution channels (providing greater reach); utilizing the P2P‐related networks to their advantage rather than disadvantage (providing greater richness); opening international markets with relative ease; and providing faster delivery times and the ability to provide a much richer content than what is currently offered. Through a succession of models, the basic conclusion is that the Internet plays a much more important role with regards the entertainment industry than currently believed. Although the artists should rightfully be compensated for their artistic talents, it is time that a new model is created to compensate them, since the existing model is not going to work due to the inadequacies of the current distribution channels that are being used by the entertainment industry.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article

Frank Alpert

In less than three decades the entertainment software industry has emerged as a huge industry, with sales larger than Hollywood movie box office sales. Yet, little is…

Abstract

Purpose

In less than three decades the entertainment software industry has emerged as a huge industry, with sales larger than Hollywood movie box office sales. Yet, little is known about this industry. Stereotypes about the industry may not be correct. This paper seeks to address this knowledge gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies what is known, and what needs to be known. The paper reviews the literature and adds data from the most recent reports available.

Findings

The literature has been slow to address this industry. It has not even been clear what to call this industry. (Some people still call it the video game industry.) The most basic marketing issues still need to be researched, i.e. customer benefits sought and segmentation. A typology of game genres is proposed.

Originality/value

This paper is the first overview of the entertainment software industry from a marketing perspective.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article

Alice Aguiar-Noury and Pedro Garcia-del-Barrio

The purpose of this paper is to accomplish several goals. First, it studies the relevance of the sports sector as part of the entertainment industry. Second, it identifies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to accomplish several goals. First, it studies the relevance of the sports sector as part of the entertainment industry. Second, it identifies promising markets within the sports industry, paying special attention to the relative importance of soccer in the context of team-sport leagues. Finally, the paper helps entrepreneurs to recognized market opportunities in the sports industry by identifying the soccer clubs that were found to be low-risk global brands.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate the relevance of the entertainment and sports industries, both in the USA and EU-28, the authors rely on their respective contribution to the domestic product and to employment. Two procedures are proposed for establishing the status of global sport leagues: one is based on the annual revenues and the other on the degree of interest that the public shows for each professional sport league. (The latter is performed by comparing the intensity with which internet users search for contents related to each of the Top-10 sports leagues worldwide.) Finally, by estimating the fixed effects of a model in which sport performance is filtered out, we calculate the expected low-risk revenues that clubs generate due to their heterogeneous brand value.

Findings

This paper reaches some few relevant results. First, we find that the greater employment opportunities in the European sport industry are concentrated in the UK, Spain, France and Germany, which may orientate entrepreneurs to start projects in promising sport markets. Then, data on annual revenues is used to rank the main team-sport leagues worldwide: NFL, MLB, NBA, Premier League and NHL. Another rank is based on the degree of interest of fans (as captured by Google Trends) yields a different result, where the NFL, NBA and the UEFA Champions League are, respectively, at command. Besides, the paper also ranks clubs as valuable assets by identifying which of them are low-risk soccer brands. The empirical study provides insights to select business opportunities by targeting the less-risky clubs or leagues, by calculating the expected annual revenues of clubs regardless of their recent sports performances.

Originality/value

This paper is innovative in two ways. First, it develops an analysis based on Google Trends to establish the comparative status of team-sport leagues worldwide. Second, by adopting an original empirical approach, it identifies markets and brands to carry out low-risk entrepreneurial projects. The expected potential revenues derived from this procedure are not contingent to the risk due to poor sport achievements in a particular season. To our knowledge, researchers have not computed in the past such calculations as that we name here low-risk revenues.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article

Steven Chen

The purpose of this paper is to outline a framework for marketing cultural goods (e.g. music) to global markets by examining modes of entry and positioning strategies used…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a framework for marketing cultural goods (e.g. music) to global markets by examining modes of entry and positioning strategies used by media producers of the South Korean music industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An historic analysis was implemented to investigate the modalities and structures through which cultural products are produced and disseminated. Data for this study came from 314 articles collected from www.allkpop.com, a leading English-language, South Korean popular culture news site.

Findings

The cultural technology framework consists of the institutionalization of cultural technology, exportation of cultural content, collaborations with local talent, and joint ventures with local markets.

Research limitations/implications

The findings emerge from an analysis of South Korean popular music industries, and further research is needed to generalize the results across cultural industries.

Practical implications

The cultural technology framework can be applied to cultural industries such as music, film, comics, and art, where culture and language could be barriers to adoption.

Originality/value

This study outlines a framework for the modes of entry and positioning strategies of cultural goods (e.g. music) in international markets. Extant literature has examined global marketing from the purview of durable consumer goods and brands, with limited insights into cultural products. More broadly, this paper addresses the call for more qualitative inquiry into international marketing topics.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part

Gerben Bakker

At the end of the nineteenth century, in the era of the second industrial revolution, falling working hours, rising disposable income, increasing urbanisation, rapidly…

Abstract

At the end of the nineteenth century, in the era of the second industrial revolution, falling working hours, rising disposable income, increasing urbanisation, rapidly expanding transport networks and strong population growth resulted in a sharp rise in the demand for entertainment. Initially, the expenditure was spread across different categories, such as live entertainment, sports, music, bowling alleys or skating rinks. One of these categories was cinematographic entertainment, a new service, based on a new technology. Initially it seemed not more than a fad, a novelty shown at fairs, but it quickly emerged as the dominant form of popular entertainment. This paper argues that the take-off of cinema was largely demand-driven, and that, in an evolutionary process, consumers allocated more and more expenditure to cinema. It will analyse how consumer habits and practices evolved with the new cinema technology and led to the formation of a new product/service.

Details

The Evolution of Consumption: Theories and Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1452-2

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article

Rodney Jensen

The purpose of this research has been to compile an up to date survey of the management methods of the film and television industries used by local and regional government…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research has been to compile an up to date survey of the management methods of the film and television industries used by local and regional government agencies in international production centres. It was intended that the results of the survey would clarify differences in mode of operation and governance and the factors that may contribute to their “attractiveness” from the point of view of the film production market.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used a combination of written questions and telephone interviews to elicit responses from selected agencies in English‐speaking countries. A typology of different management approaches has been prepared on the basis of the survey data.

Findings

The main findings are that the primary government role is connected with film production management, yet very limited evidence has been found for proactive spatial/economic planning support for the industry by local or regional government.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the research relate to the smallness of the sample and the difficulty, in some cases, of eliciting meaningful responses. The implications of the findings are considered to be of considerable relevance to desirable modes of governance, the need for planning reform, and ways in which production management processes can be better streamlined. The potential role for local or regional government in adopting practices more in tune with market requirements has considerable implications for the creative and cultural economy, and the findings are of relevance to government decision makers and senior policy staff.

Social implications

The social implications are indirect and theoretical as they relate to improvements in the cultural landscape of spatial industry clusters. They have not been examined in this paper.

Originality/value

This research program is considered to have originality in that it bridges distinct areas of inquiry usually dealt with by separate professions or skill‐sets (film production, governance and management). Its originality is supported by the limited data discovered in the literature on this combination of topics.

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Article

So-Hyun Lee, Soobin Choi and Hee-Woong Kim

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key success factors behind Bangtan Boys’ (BTS) popularity, and how they can contribute to sustaining it, along with detailed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key success factors behind Bangtan Boys’ (BTS) popularity, and how they can contribute to sustaining it, along with detailed strategies for the success of global pop.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a mixed-methods approach that uses text mining and interviews and uses the success of BTS to find the key factors accounting for its sustained popularity. For use in text mining, we collected data related to BTS from social network sites (SNS) and analyzed this data using latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) topic modeling, term frequency analysis and keyword extraction. In addition, we conducted interviews to explore the key factors accounting for the sustained popularity of BTS.

Findings

We found ten key success factors—active global fandom, SNS communication, fans' loyalty, empathy through music, storytelling and world view, performance quality, music video quality, overseas expansion at an early stage, efforts for self-development and teamwork among members— for a global pop group's success and sustained popularity.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the literature by finding key factors for success and sustained popularity of a global group through using a mixed-methods approach.

Practical implications

Our results suggest strategies to sustain the popularity of global groups and its potential to benefit across the entertainment industry.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to comprehensively examine the key factors for Korean pop’s (K-pop) sustained popularity by using a mixed-methods approach of text mining and interviews.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Paul Sergius Koku

Examines the use of the bizarre or the outrageous in the entertainment industry as apromotion strategy, and specifically the propensity of rock/pop artistes to engage…

Abstract

Examines the use of the bizarre or the outrageous in the entertainment industry as a promotion strategy, and specifically the propensity of rock/pop artistes to engage in bizarre or outrageous acts or conduct. Provides a brief survey of the practice. Next, using economic theories of human behavior to maximize expected utility and minimize transaction and learning costs, shows that what may appear as a thoughtless act or outrageous behavior by an artiste could in fact be a well‐thought‐out promotion strategy with valid economic underpinnings designed to promote the artiste. Such acts do not only confer uniqueness on the individual artiste, but are also useful in reducing the learning and transaction costs incurred by fans, and hence beneficial to both the artistes and the consumers. Suggests some less controversial but effective strategies for promoting artistes.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article

Sandro Formica and Michael D. Olsen

The aim of this paper is to explore the amusement park industry and its evolution during the 1990s. The primary causes of change in this industry are determined and their…

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore the amusement park industry and its evolution during the 1990s. The primary causes of change in this industry are determined and their impact on the companies operating in this business is investigated. The assumption to be ascertained is how currently operating amusement park firms have been able to effectively respond to the threats and opportunities created by the environmental changes occurring in the 1990s. The analysis is framed into three main sections: first, it offers an overview of the amusement industry; second, it examines the environmental trends affecting it; and third, it attempts to delineate the future development of the amusement business.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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