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Article

John Dawson and Leigh Sparks

The idea that “anything goes” in enterprise zones certainly is not the case, particularly as regards retailing. Floorspace size limits on new retail developments…

Abstract

The idea that “anything goes” in enterprise zones certainly is not the case, particularly as regards retailing. Floorspace size limits on new retail developments, stringent in some cases, are commonplace. John Dawson and Leigh Sparks look at the various schemes and compare the restrictions, which have been set to exclude superstores, hypermarkets, discount stores and the like.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Andrew Powell, Gwyn Prescott and Stuart Gronow

Marketing can be defined as ‘the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably. The most profitable new…

Abstract

Marketing can be defined as ‘the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably. The most profitable new markets are developed from the recognition of a need which is not being satisfied’. For industrial and commercial property, several discrete stages can be identified in the long‐term process of marketing. In this paper, these stages will be used to outline a marketing strategy for enterprise zones, based on a continuing study of the Swansea Enterprise Zone. It is readily acknowledged that the approach has been adapted from the views of E. S. Cleavely found in his leading text — ‘The Marketing of Industrial and Commercial Property’.

Details

Property Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article

Mark N. Wexler and Judy Oberlander

This paper examines the relevance of the wicked problem continuum, particularly the emergence of super wicked challenges for public leadership researchers. Contemporary…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relevance of the wicked problem continuum, particularly the emergence of super wicked challenges for public leadership researchers. Contemporary theorizing on public leadership adequately deals with tame challenges, struggles with wicked problems and remains in the dark with regards to the implications of super wicked problems

Design/methodology/approach

The wicked problem continuum provides a typology or set of dilemmas running from tame to wicked through to super wicked problems. These different problem types are treated as if they were on a three-zone continuum in which the difficulty of solving or substantially reducing the problem varies from relatively low to very high.

Findings

We delineate the three-problem contexts in the wicked problem continuum and discuss the ideal type of organization thriving in each zone. We then posit two opposing wicked problem interpretations-taming and wilding- for those interested in public leadership. Taming calls for prudent, results-oriented leaders employing tried and tested practices. Wilding demands leaders who test the status quo by seeking alternatives.

Social implications

On the global leadership agenda, wilding problems—those calling attention to the super wicked zone—are escalating. Despite this, public leaders' training lacks a framework for making sense of these urgent and publicly contentious super wicked problems.

Originality/value

Public policy researchers are beginning to direct attention to super wicked problems such as climate change, and pandemics. This work introduces the wicked problem continuum and demonstrates its pertinence for researchers of public leadership.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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Book part

Tomasz Dorożyński, Janusz Świerkocki and Wojciech Urbaniak

One of the ways of convincing investors, in particular foreign ones, to take part in the implementation of host country economic policies is the development of Special…

Abstract

One of the ways of convincing investors, in particular foreign ones, to take part in the implementation of host country economic policies is the development of Special Economic Zones (SEZs) designed to ensure more favourable business environment than those available in other locations. Poland has created and develops the SEZs. They play a positive role in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) or creating new jobs but also may have negative consequences, such as deepening regional disproportions in the country.

This paper aims at examining why certain SEZs in Poland attracted more FDI than other. In our opinion that may result from the location in a particular region (understood as a unit of administrative division of the country at the level of a voivodeship) and from endogenous conditions characteristic of the zone, such as the land it owns, infrastructure and its accessibility and finally high quality performance of the company that manages the zone.

Our calculations have shown statistically significant positive relationships between FDI inflow to SEZ and overall and some partial coefficients that describe investment attractiveness of voivodeships. Test results also suggest that efforts of managing companies with regard to wooing investors (e.g. through promotions, infrastructure development) are important in increasing the inflow of foreign investment.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Finance: Current Challenges from Across Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-907-0

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Article

John Stanworth and Celia Stanworth

Under the Thatcher Government′s “EnterpriseCulture”, the size of the small business sector hasfrequently been taken as a key indicator ofeconomic success in Britain…

Abstract

Under the Thatcher Government′s “Enterprise Culture”, the size of the small business sector has frequently been taken as a key indicator of economic success in Britain. Measurement of achievement in such terms does indeed indicate a high degree of economic buoyancy. However, a deeper examination of available data indicates that much of this success may be illusory and dependent for its survival on substantial levels of state intervention. At the same time, an examination of regional patterns of small business success reveals a picture somewhat similar to that pertaining to the economy as a whole. Far from raining down success selectively on economically deprived areas, as had been hoped in some circles, it appears that it is the most prosperous areas which tend to support the highest levels of enterprise.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Charles J. Popovich

Online bibliographic searching is offered as a solution for classifying the proliferating and diverse research prevalent in the field of international business…

Abstract

Online bibliographic searching is offered as a solution for classifying the proliferating and diverse research prevalent in the field of international business. Introductory comments discuss the rationale for such action while guidelines are set forth that describe the methodological elements such as the categories of terminology, database selection and search strategy. Included too are suggestions for alternative methods of conducting a bibliographic search on the topic.

Details

Online Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article

Minh Tam Thi Bui and Arayah Preechametta

The purpose of this paper is to examine effects of regional economic integration on the concentration of manufacturing firms in provinces of Thailand on the border with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine effects of regional economic integration on the concentration of manufacturing firms in provinces of Thailand on the border with Cambodia. It aims to clarify the interactions between dispersion and agglomeration forces within a firm’s location choice in the presence of economic integration and thereby to explain the feasibility of the border SEZs.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of industrial clustering and New Economic Geography provides a theoretical framework to understand the locations of economic activities when regional economies are integrated. This paper employs provincial level data to calculate industry location quotients across a 10-year period from 2007 to 2017 in central Thailand and uses firm-level data from industrial censuses in 2006 and 2011 to estimate logit models for two border provinces with Cambodia and three eastern seaboard provinces. Two base models and extended models are tested to explain the persistent agglomeration of Thai firms in each manufacturing industry.

Findings

The authors found a positive correlation between the agglomeration level in 2006 and the choice of firms toward the border provinces in 2011. The disaggregated analysis shows that depending on the initial level of concentration in each industry, there can be agglomeration or dispersion effects. The advantage of low trade costs and labor costs of unskilled migrant workers are not significant factors attracting firms to the border. Firms in industries with increasing returns are more likely to stay in the hub.

Practical implications

The disaggregated analysis by industry provides very important implications for SEZ policy interventions. The important role of agglomeration economies limits the extent to which such policies can be successful. It would be an enormous challenge for policy makers to initiate forces which are strong enough to induce firms to relocate away from areas with high agglomerations. Policy interventions with attractive incentives should be very selective to industries already have a certain degree of concentration in the provinces so as to reinforce the agglomeration effects.

Originality/value

The research extends the empirical literature on SEZs by offering a unique case study of an emerging economy with a strong market foundation rather than a transitional or developed economy. It is also different from other research on SEZs when taking into account the effects of regional integration on border SEZ formation and firms’ location choices. In addition, this study employs firm-level data rather than provincial data to bring empirical insights and fill in the knowledge gap on agglomeration economies in Thailand with the presence of regional economic integration.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Book part

Andrew Schrank

What are the social and ecological roots of export diversification in the developing world? On the one hand, I attribute the growth of nontraditional, manufactured exports…

Abstract

What are the social and ecological roots of export diversification in the developing world? On the one hand, I attribute the growth of nontraditional, manufactured exports from the Dominican Republic to the traditional agro-export elite's use of free trade zones to offset the consequences of urban biased, import-substituting industrialization in the 1970s, and thereby portray diversification as an incremental response to government predation rather than a coherent product of government planning. On the other hand, I hold that the nature, timing, and location of the nontraditional export supply response have necessarily been circumscribed by preexisting social and ecological circumstances, and thereby underscore the structural impediments to similar diversification efforts elsewhere in the developing world. My findings are of both theoretical relevance and policy import, for they serve to underscore the limitations to the regnant neoliberal development orthodoxy as well as the available sociological alternatives.

Details

Nature, Raw Materials, and Political Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-314-3

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Expert briefing

Place-based policies.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB251520

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Book part

Abstract

Details

Urban Dynamics and Growth: Advances in Urban Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-481-3

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