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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Victoria Harte and Jim Stewart

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the proposal that curriculum designed for and about enterprise education can be sustained via a cyclical model of evaluation. Such…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the proposal that curriculum designed for and about enterprise education can be sustained via a cyclical model of evaluation. Such an approach takes into consideration an important aspect of enterprise education which is “context”, a significant aspect overtly linked to the differing subject disciplines offering such curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of this research project was driven by the authors’ suggestion that to evaluate the impact of enterprise education pedagogy different factors to those that are currently prescribed need to be taken into consideration. Current evaluation practice is to take a global, generic approach, often utilising quantitative techniques, but the authors argue that evaluation of enterprise education should consider local, contextual factors only – key contextual factors being subject discipline, along with the lecturer's own context, teaching and learning materials and implicit and explicit notions of enterprise education. The research utilised two different modules and approaches to evaluation: first, a questionnaire designed using module materials such as learning descriptor and module outcomes which produced quantitative data that could be linked directly to the module learning and teaching inputs as well as lecturer's approach; and second, a focus group‐type approach undertaken with students on a completely separate and distinct module returning qualitative data, The former module was explicitly enterprise education and the latter module had a very implicit nature in relation to enterprise education. The students for the latter module were not aware of the enterprise connotation of the module.

Findings

The authors’ notion that contextual evaluation has real value was upheld in each case. Both lecturers used the data collected to improve and make productive changes to their module content and teaching and learning materials for the following cohorts of students.

Practical implications

It is the authors’ belief that contextual evaluation offers enterprise education pedagogy the opportunity to be evaluated in a more useful and practical forum, with results not only illustrating the impact on students but also on the module content and how this has been instrumental in the students’ progress.

Originality/value

Those wishing to embed and sustain enterprise education by keeping the topic up to date on an annual basis will find this case study useful and, upon request, may have access to the evaluation methods used by the authors.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Norma Iredale

This article has arisen from a survey conducted in two NorthernLEAs. First seeks to put enterprise education into context and givesDurham University Business School′s…

Abstract

This article has arisen from a survey conducted in two Northern LEAs. First seeks to put enterprise education into context and gives Durham University Business School′s (DUBS) view of it. Then addresses the survey; this was carried out in 50 schools in Durham and Gateshead and aimed to discover what impact the DUBS “Primary Enterprise” resource material had made in primary schools and the training programme run in conjunction with this. It also sought to determine the influence made by this approach to teaching and learning and to identify ways in which an enterprising approach could be incorporated into the school curriculum. Discusses the results of the survey together with their implications. Recognizes that, while this research was generated at a regional level, the findings have more far‐reaching implications and are of benefit to a wider audience.

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Education + Training, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Sally Caird

The proliferation of enterprise education initiatives in Britainemphasises the importance of understanding the meaning of the term“enterprise competency”. Ironically…

Abstract

The proliferation of enterprise education initiatives in Britain emphasises the importance of understanding the meaning of the term “enterprise competency”. Ironically, though the provision for enterprise education grows, there are few research and evaluation studies available to clarify the meaning of enterprise competency for education and assessment. A literature review of this area which is published by the Scottish Enterprise Foundation is summarised. Without precise definitions and research enterprise competency risks meaning everything and nothing to those involved with enterprise education and assessment.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2022

Peter Tiernan and Jane O’Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to examine the attitudes and impressions of pre-service Further Education teachers towards enterprise education. It also looks at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the attitudes and impressions of pre-service Further Education teachers towards enterprise education. It also looks at the potential impact on their future teaching practices and aspirations. This study builds on the literature in this area by bringing a teacher education focus and by providing views from the underserved further education sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was used to evaluate pre-service further education teachers' understanding of and attitudes towards, enterprise education. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 15 students in their final year of an initial teacher education degree.

Findings

Findings emerged through constant comparative analysis of interview transcripts. These findings indicate that exposure to enterprise education greatly increased understanding of its importance and relevance, while also encouraging pre-service further education teachers to recognise the benefits of incorporating enterprise education into their classrooms of the future.

Originality/value

While there is an array of literature on entrepreneurship and enterprise education outside of business contents, very few studies exist, which examine enterprise education in an initial teacher education context. Fewer still examine enterprise education from the perspective of further education. This study provides a unique qualitative view of pre-service further education teachers' impressions of enterprise education and their aspirations for the future.

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Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2012

Piers Thompson, Caleb C.Y. Kwong and Dylan Jones-Evans

Enterprise education has been regularly cited as a tool which can be utilised to not only increase the level of entrepreneurship within an economy, but also the success of…

Abstract

Enterprise education has been regularly cited as a tool which can be utilised to not only increase the level of entrepreneurship within an economy, but also the success of those enterprises created. This chapter explores the extent to which participation in enterprise education is associated with the adoption of new technology within new businesses since this is one way that businesses can remain competitive, not only within their own countries, but when competing internationally. Using data from the UK Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) survey, the study finds evidence that those firms undertaking enterprise education in the form of university-based schemes or government sponsored training programmes are more likely to be using newer technology. However, this relationship is relatively weak, and brings into question whether many enterprise courses offer effective value for money.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-118-3

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Andrew Paul Clarke, Clare Cornes and Natalie Ferry

A case study was undertaken to evaluate the use of self-reflection in enterprise education in a UK university, where the taught content was tailored to ensure relevance to…

Abstract

Purpose

A case study was undertaken to evaluate the use of self-reflection in enterprise education in a UK university, where the taught content was tailored to ensure relevance to the students who were from a variety of subject disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

Enterprise taught content was established in masters level 7 programmes across a range of subject disciplines. Taught content was designed using problem based learning, and evaluated using self-reflective methodologies. The paper reflects on the current position of enterprise education and asks the research question of whether the use of self-reflective teaching methodologies are valid for enterprise education.

Findings

Results suggest that the students appreciated the introduction of enterprise into their course and in the main did not view it as disjointed or irrelevant to their wider aims. More so, the students commented favourably towards the integration of enterprise into their primary discipline, and noted an enhanced learning experience because of this integration.

Research limitations/implications

For the University: A novel approach to enterprise teaching has been developed at a UK university, focusing on teaching non-business students how to be more valuable to a business within their degree subject context. This has empowered the students with an enhanced understanding of commercial issues and increased employability (Rae 2007; Huq and Gilbert 2017). This has also led to enhanced relationships with industry and given students a wider understanding of their degree area.

Practical implications

For the educator: The use of self-reflective teaching methodologies (Hayward 2000) are noted to be vital in order to deliver enterprise education in a way that is relevant to the student cohort body. By reflecting on one’s teaching style and delivery method, the authors were able to engage non-business students in enterprise education, and receive a high level of student satisfaction. It is noted that self-reflection was a valuable process for delivery to each degree discipline. By employing problem based learning and self-reflective teaching methodologies, an increased synergy between the business taught elements and the science subjects was created.

Originality/value

This approach is shown to empower the students with an enhanced understanding of commercial issues and an increased employability. This has led to enhanced relationships between academia and industry, and given students a wider understanding of their degree area; the enhanced relationships with industry offer students a wider commercial understanding of their degree area. A gap in the current knowledge base in enterprise education has been identified: enterprise education with the aim of educating the student to be more valuable to a business as opposed to starting a business. The use of self-reflective methodologies has offered a novel approach to enterprise teaching in a UK university.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Rakesh Belwal, Hanan Al Balushi and Shweta Belwal

Universities and other higher educational institutions play an increasingly important role in providing entrepreneurship education, training, and technical assistance to…

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Abstract

Purpose

Universities and other higher educational institutions play an increasingly important role in providing entrepreneurship education, training, and technical assistance to existing and potential entrepreneurs. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ perceptions of entrepreneurship and the role of universities in developing enterprise education in Oman, focusing on the case of Sohar University.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a questionnaire based survey to collect primary data. From the total population of 3,633 students registered across different faculties during the academic year 2012-2013, a sample size of 200 was drawn using convenience sampling and the proportional allocation method.

Findings

The research outcomes revealed that the majority of the university students were optimistic and interested in starting their own business, but lacked knowledge about how to start a business. The students’ willingness to run a business and their sociable, go-getter attitude, confidence, and effective connections with established entrepreneurs were observed as enablers. Fear of failure and unwillingness to take risks were the major obstacles facing university students in treading an entrepreneurial path.

Practical implications

Overall, the study indicated a need for enterprise education, at programme and course levels, to nurture entrepreneurship among students in Oman.

Social implications

Currently, Omani society is affected by a high level of unemployment. The research outcomes will help policy makers in assessing the potential of enterprise education. The promotion of entrepreneurship among women will enable more women to work shoulder to shoulder with their male counterparts in building Oman’s economy. In a region where even today large numbers of women would never remove the face veil in front of male non-family members, these developments are very significant.

Originality/value

Very few studies have examined university students’ attitude to entrepreneurship and enterprise education in Oman. This study helps in bridging that gap.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Alan Murray

The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on how assessment is used to support the aims of enterprise education leading to recommendations for improvements to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on how assessment is used to support the aims of enterprise education leading to recommendations for improvements to the current approach to the assessment of enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a review of entrepreneurship education literature and a qualitative case study conducted on a sample of enterprise educators at University of the West of Scotland. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Paradoxically, the traditional enterprise education paradigm harms that which it attempts to nurture: entrepreneurial thinking and activity. The rationalised approach to education conflicts with the aims of enterprise educators, and there is evidence of a visible and growing disconnect between academia (the theory) and industry (the practice).

Research limitations/implications

The work is limited as it concentrates on a single case study. The qualitative approach focusses on a specific social field and therefore the findings cannot be generalised to other settings. These limitations can be addressed in future research.

Practical implications

This work has resonance for enterprise educators delivering and assessing entrepreneurial learning in an academic setting and will also be of interest to decision makers within this sector concerned with ensuring academic practice remains aligned to policy and industry requirements.

Originality/value

Enterprise education is well researched; however, there is a gap in the area of enterprise assessment which is under researched and not well understood.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Brian Jones and Norma Iredale

This paper seeks to suggest that the most appropriate way to construe the concept of enterprise education is from a pedagogical viewpoint. Enterprise education as pedagogy…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to suggest that the most appropriate way to construe the concept of enterprise education is from a pedagogical viewpoint. Enterprise education as pedagogy is argued to be the most appropriate way to think about the concept and serves to demarcate it from entrepreneurship education, which is very much about business start‐up and the new venture creation process.

Design/methodology/approach

Enterprise education is underpinned by experiential action learning that can be in, outside and away from the normal classroom environment. It can be delivered across a range of subject areas throughout different phases of education.

Findings

Enterprise and entrepreneurship education are perceived to be conflated terms that for many in the education and business communities mean much the same thing. Adopting an enterprise education approach allows greater pupil/student ownership of the learning process.

Practical implications

Enterprise education as pedagogy advocates an approach to teaching where specific learning outcomes differ across and between different educational phases and subject areas but which has a clear and coherent philosophical underpinning.

Originality/value

Enterprise education should not be equated solely with business, as it is a broader, deeper and richer concept. The theoretical import of the paper is in part a plea for a more rigorous, practically informed analysis of the different strands (pedagogy, entrepreneurship, citizenship and civic responsibility) that make up enterprise education. The paper also sets out the case for a more critical analysis of enterprise education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Kerry Lee, Ghada Hebaishi and John Hope

The New Zealand Ministry of Education identified that teachers need to be confident they have the support of their school management team before they embrace twenty-first…

Abstract

Purpose

The New Zealand Ministry of Education identified that teachers need to be confident they have the support of their school management team before they embrace twenty-first century teaching and learning in enterprise education (Ministry of Education, 2013b). The purpose of this paper is to outline an interpretive case study which investigated the views held by the management of a New Zealand secondary school, well known for enterprise education.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used semi-structured interviews to investigate what aspects were deemed important by senior management and whether they saw themselves as pivotal in the success of enterprise education.

Findings

The management team believed their role to be pivotal and that nine aspects were necessary for a successful enterprise programme.

Originality/value

It is anticipated that the results from this interpretive case study will assist others in their planning, development and success of future quality enterprise education programmes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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