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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Jyotsna Gupta, Shivendra Singh, Ramesh Pandita and Suneel Kumar Bhat

This study aims to assess the enrolment scenario of Library and Information Science (LIS) education in India offered through distance mode.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the enrolment scenario of Library and Information Science (LIS) education in India offered through distance mode.

Design/methodology/approach

The scope of the study is limited to India, reflecting the trend of distance education in LIS in India. The study is based on the secondary data collected by the Ministry of Human Resource and Development, Government of India (GOI) under All India Survey on Higher Education (AISHE). It is to mention that Ministry of Human Resource and Development, GOI, is regularly collecting data from higher education institutions all across the country under AISHE project. The data in the study have been analysed for the period 2011 to 2018.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that, of the total enrolments made in LIS education in India during the period 2011 to 2018, nearly one-fourth of students were enrolled through regular mode and three-fourth were enrolled through distance mode, signifying distance mode of education as the largest medium of LIS education in India. The enrolment figures through distance mode showed slight inconsistency with the result, a negative (−0.49%) average annual corresponding growth was recorded in the enrolment of LIS students through distance mode. Of the total students enrolled in different LIS programmes through distance mode during the period of study, the majority (67.78%) of students were enrolled in the Under Graduate programme (B.Lib.I.Sc.). Similarly, of the total students enrolled in LIS through distance mode during the period of study, 51.36% were female students and 48.63% male students. In terms of caste category, of the total students enrolled during the period of study, 10.12% belonged to the Scheduled Caste category, 4.7% to Scheduled Tribes category, 28.77% Other Backward Class and 56.08% to others, which include general category students as well.

Research limitations/implications

Learning through distance education is a welcome step as long as the idea is to improve the society and to reach out to those who hitherto remained unreached. Sustainable means of enrolment and employability has to be the order of the day, mostly based on demand and supply principle.

Originality/value

This study is original and first of its kind covering enrolment of the students in LIS courses.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Natsuho Yoshida

The purpose of this paper is to explore individual enrolment trajectories to fully understand the actual disparity in secondary education enrolment statuses among the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore individual enrolment trajectories to fully understand the actual disparity in secondary education enrolment statuses among the different socio-economic status (SES) groups in a newly emerged nation, Myanmar.

Design/methodology/approach

The differences in enrolment statuses among various SES groups (high, middle and low) were examined based on enrolment trajectory diagrams and individual enrolment patterns using longitudinal data. The analyses utilised a sample of 932 students from government schools in the urban Yangon Region.

Findings

The results revealed that the ideal enrolment trajectory cases (i.e. entering secondary education at Myanmar’s official age and completing all grades without repetition) increased for the highest-SES level, whilst the cases with diverse and complex enrolment trajectories increased for the lower-SES levels. Additionally, over-aged students in the lowest-SES level (boys in particular) were more likely to demonstrate worse enrolment patterns.

Originality/value

By analysing disparities with enrolment trajectories rather than with the cross-sectional parity index, the findings offer clearer and more detailed evidence for the current enrolment status inequalities by SES level in Myanmar. This more complete evidence could allow for an effective accomplishment of worldwide equitable and universal secondary education.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Brian Spittle

Purpose – This chapter aims to provide an overview of the use of strategic enrolment management at DePaul University in Chicago.Design/methodology/approach – A case study…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims to provide an overview of the use of strategic enrolment management at DePaul University in Chicago.

Design/methodology/approach – A case study approach is used to provide an analysis of strategic enrolment management (SEM) and its particular use at DePaul University in the context of the university's long-standing commitment to student access.

Findings – As the United Kingdom moves to a more market-based system of higher education, universities may need to pay closer attention to strategic enrolment management concepts and practices. While enrolment management has been criticised for reflecting a wider movement toward ‘marketisation’ in higher education, the experience at DePaul University in Chicago indicates that SEM has played an important role in clarifying the university's commitment to student access during a period of environmental and institutional change.

Originality/value – This chapter sets DePaul's experience within the wider development of SEM in the United States and illustrates some of the ways in which enrolment managers at the university have been able to balance a mission-based commitment to student access with other institutional goals and priorities.

Details

Institutional Transformation to Engage a Diverse Student Body
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-904-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Katharina Michaelowa

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the relationship among different levels of education.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the relationship among different levels of education.

Design/methodology/approach

International cross‐country comparisons, bi‐ and multivariate analyses, with many graphical illustrations. These methods are used to compare educational outcomes at the primary, secondary and tertiary level in terms of quantity (enrolment) and quality (measured in terms of student achievement, university rankings, patents and researchers), and to analyse the impact of heterogeneity between secondary schools on tertiary outcomes.

Findings

The results suggest that certain minimum levels of enrolment at primary and secondary level represent a necessary condition for the development of functioning higher education. Another relevant result of our analysis is that strong differences between educational institutions at secondary level may be detrimental for tertiary education quality.

Research limitations/implications

This research only represents an initial explorative analysis.

Practical implications

In order to improve tertiary education outcomes, education policy should not concentrate on tertiary education alone, but also consider insufficiencies at lower levels of education.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to fill a gap in the present educational literature in that it tries to provide some empirical evidence for the theoretical argument that quality tertiary education requires a sound basis of students to draw from; i.e. a basis of students which should be restricted as little as possible by lack of access to secondary or even primary education, and/or by lack of access to sufficiently quality oriented schools.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Kathryn Gay Hardwick-Franco

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to explore the extent to which the South Australian flexible learning option (FLO) secondary school enrolment strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to explore the extent to which the South Australian flexible learning option (FLO) secondary school enrolment strategy supports some of the most vulnerable and disengaged students to simultaneously engage in secondary- and higher-education, skills and work-based learning; second, to explore the degree to which this FLO enrolment strategy addresses the United Nations (UN) principles of responsible management education and 17 sustainable development goals.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach includes a practice perspective, field-notes and documents analysis.

Findings

This paper finds the flexibility inherent in the FLO enrolment strategy goes some way to addressing inequity in education outcomes amongst those who traditionally disengage from education and work-based learning. Findings also highlight ways in which the FLO enrolment strategy addresses some of the UN principals and 17 goals.

Research limitations/implications

This paper supports the work of HESWBL by calling for future research into the long-term benefits of flexible education strategies that support HESWBL, through exploring the benefits to young people, from their perspective, with a view to providing accountability.

Social implications

The paper offers an example of a way a practice perspective can explore an education strategy that addresses “wicked problems” (Rittel and Webber, 1973). Currently, “wicked problems” that pervade member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development include intergenerational poverty, under-education and unemployment.

Originality/value

This paper is valuable because it explores from a practice perspective, how a secondary education enrolment strategy supports vulnerable students engage in their secondary schooling, while simultaneously supporting students achieve higher education, skills and work-based learning.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Riza Casidy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived brand orientation (PBO), satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour in…

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1914

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived brand orientation (PBO), satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour in the Australian higher education sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Two hundred and fifty-eight questionnaires were completed by undergraduate students of a particular university in Australia. Structural equation modeling was employed in this study to examine the associations between the constructs.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence that PBO has a positive and significant relationship with all dependent variables. The research reveals that students' perception of a university's brand orientation is significantly related to satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The findings may guide the key decision makers in higher education institutions to understand the importance of brand orientation in their corporate strategy to enhance satisfaction, loyalty, and positive WOM, which can be used to differentiate themselves from other institutions in the highly competitive education market.

Originality/value

Past researchers have not looked into the dynamic relationships between PBO, satisfaction, loyalty, and post-enrolment communication behaviour, and hence research is to be called for in this area. The paper is the first to examine brand orientation from the perspective of the students and provide higher education institutions with recommendations to improve service quality through brand orientation.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Muazu Ibrahim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effect of human capital in financial development–economic growth nexus. Relative to the quantity-based measure of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effect of human capital in financial development–economic growth nexus. Relative to the quantity-based measure of enrolment rates, the main aim was to determine how quality of human capital proxied by pupil–teacher ratio influences the relationship between domestic financial sector development and overall economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are obtained from the World Development Indicators of the World Bank for 29 sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries over the period 1980–2014. The analyses were conducted using the system generalised method of moments within the endogenous growth framework while controlling for country-specific and time effects. The author also follows Papke and Wooldridge procedure in examining the long-run estimates of the variables of interest.

Findings

The key finding is that, while both human capital and financial development unconditionally promotes growth in both the short and long run, results from the interactive terms suggest that, irrespective of the measure of finance, financial sector development largely spurs growth on the back of quality human capital. This finding is also confirmed by the marginal and net effects where the interactive effect of pupil–teacher ratio and indicators of finance are consistently huge relative to the enrolment. Statistically, the results are robust to model specification.

Practical implications

While it is laudable for SSA countries to increase access to education, it is equally more crucial to increase the supply of teachers at the same time improving on the limited teaching and learning materials. Indeed, there are efforts to develop rather low levels of the financial sector owing to its unconditional growth effects. Beyond the direct benefit of finance, however, higher growth effect of finance is conditioned on the quality level of human capital. The outcome of this study should therefore reignite the recognition of the complementarity role of human capital and finance in economic growth process.

Originality/value

The study makes significant contributions to existing finance–growth literature in so many ways: first, the auhor extend the literature by empirically examining how different measures of human capital shape the finance–economic growth nexus. Through this the author is able to bring a different perspective in the literature highlighting the role of countries’ human capital stock in mediating the impact of financial deepening on economic growth. Second, the author makes a more systematic attempt to evaluate the relative importance of finance and human capital in growth process while controlling for several ancillary variables.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

K.M. Joshi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the status of access to school amongst the indigenous children of India. It looks at the enrolment, gender parity and drop‐out at…

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3431

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the status of access to school amongst the indigenous children of India. It looks at the enrolment, gender parity and drop‐out at different levels of school education as well as gender‐wise.

Design/methodology/approach

Sociological factors and the economics of education discourses on the significance of education and reasons for impediments to access are reviewed. The paper uses SES data for the year 2006‐2007 published by the Indian Ministry of Human Resource Development in the year 2008.

Findings

The indigenous children still remain the most deprived group in terms of access to school education and drop‐outs. The girls are the most affected stakeholders. The enrolment and gross enrolment have increased in the last three decades, but it is still very low at the higher levels of schooling. Similarly, the gender gap amongst the indigenous children increases at the higher levels of schooling. The high poverty and opportunity cost of attending schools are the major reasons for low participation.

Research limitations/implications

Although the macro‐level strategies of government reflect an overall increase in enrolment and fall in drop‐out, research is needed to study grass root/micro‐level strategies adopted by NGOs for individual indigenous communities at different locations and their effectiveness.

Originality/value

The effective and equal access to and within indigenous children is an important tool for their socio‐economic development. The paper provides both an aggregated and a disaggregated picture by both gender and state.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Yoram Neumann and Edith Finaly‐Neumann

Develops a model which links organizational growth and decline tocompetitive strategy, the strategy‐making process and the personalcharacteristics of the chief executive…

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1429

Abstract

Develops a model which links organizational growth and decline to competitive strategy, the strategy‐making process and the personal characteristics of the chief executive officer. The model was empirically tested for private liberal art colleges where the size of the student enrolment is a dominant factor for the vitality of the institution. The major findings of the study are: enrolment growth is associated with focused strategy, the CEO innovative style, differentiation and assertive strategy‐making process; and the major discriminating factors between institutions experiencing enrolment growth and institutions experiencing enrolment decline are focused strategy and the CEO innovator cognitive style. Discusses and examines the policy implications of the study.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Katharina Michaelowa and Anke Weber

Applying the general question of aid effectiveness to the sector of education, this paper provides some evidence for a positive effect of development assistance on primary…

Abstract

Applying the general question of aid effectiveness to the sector of education, this paper provides some evidence for a positive effect of development assistance on primary enrolment and completion. However, even the most optimistic estimates clearly show that at any realistic rate of growth, aid will never be able to move the world markedly closer towards the internationally agreed objective of “Education For All”. Universal primary education requires increased efficiency of educational spending by donors and national governments alike. Moreover, there is some evidence that the recipient countries' general political and institutional background matters. Under conditions of bad governance, the impact of aid on enrolment can actually turn negative.

Details

Theory and Practice of Foreign Aid
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-52765-3

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