Search results

1 – 10 of over 25000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Ana Chadburn, Judy Smith and Joshua Milan

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the drivers that allow for enhanced personal productivity of knowledge-based workers in Central London focusing on the physical and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the drivers that allow for enhanced personal productivity of knowledge-based workers in Central London focusing on the physical and social environment as well as worker’s individual preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

A closed-ended questionnaire was sent to employees of eight professional companies (Consultancy, Financial and Media Services) based in Central London. Of the 500 questionnaires sent, 213 were successfully completed and returned, representing a response rate of 42.6 per cent.

Findings

The findings from this trial study show that comfort, convenience, IT connectivity, good design and working to a specific time scale were strong drivers of personal productivity. Knowledge workers prefer a flexible range of office settings that enable both a stimulating open and connected work environment, knowledge sharing, collaboration, as well as quiet concentration locations, free of distractions and noise. It was also found that moves of knowledge workers into open-plan office space (and especially fee earners) is normally met with initial resistance. However, there is normally greater acceptance of open space after experiencing an actual move into open-plan, with benefits improving teamwork and communication being highlighted. The research also stresses that office design considerations need to be closer aligned with knowledge worker’s overall well-being and individual psychological needs.

Research limitations/implications

Limited to Central London offices and self-assessed evaluation of productivity drivers within the knowledge worker’s office environment.

Practical implications

Corporate real estate managers and office occupiers, designers and facilities managers can use the findings as part of their workplace strategy by providing a range of flexible workplaces that allow the knowledge worker a place for greater personal productivity through the provision of a well-designed collaborative office environment alongside private and quiet working spaces. Developers and landlords should also be aware of these requirements when taking their decisions.

Originality/value

This paper focuses specifically on the high-productivity knowledge-based work environment, demonstrating that there is a need to consider the collaborative physical and social environment and the individual preferences of knowledge workers to ensure enhanced personal productivity and well-being within the office. This can be achieved through the provision of a well-designed office space that allows for open, connected and comfortable work environments, as well as opportunities to use dedicated concentration spaces that are free of distraction. It was also shown that hot-desking was unanimously disliked by knowledge workers.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Eun Jung Ko and Sang Soo Kim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate gender differences in motivations to use flexible work arrangements (FWAs) in Korea.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate gender differences in motivations to use flexible work arrangements (FWAs) in Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review on theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this study considers four motivational factors that influence the intention to use FWA: motivation for personal life, motivation for productivity, peer behaviour and concerns about career disadvantages. Survey response data drawn from 92 male and 105 female Korean workers were used to analyse differences by gender.

Findings

As for the male respondents, all four motivational factors have a significant effect on the intention to use FWA. However, in the female respondents, the effects of concerns about career disadvantages on the intention to use FWA are not significant. The results of gender differences analysis show that significant difference was not found in the effect of motivation for personal life on the intention to use FWA while the other three motivational factors have significant differences by gender.

Research limitations/implications

In this research, basing its conceptual background on TPB, a novel approach is taken by introducing motivational factors as the antecedents of intention to use FWA. This is a more systematic view on individuals’ behavioural mechanism relating to the intention to choose FWA. It is also meaningful in that this study looks at the intention to use FWA from a broader perspective by suggesting gender differences as critical analysis criteria given the uniqueness of Korean labour market.

Practical implications

For an effective operation of FWA, it is important not only to launch a flexible working programme itself, but also to ensure that the users are properly understood and fairly evaluated.

Originality/value

Considering the motivations of utilising FWA from various angles will contribute to coming up with various measures to raise the use and effectiveness of FWA.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Russell Jaffe, Robert A. Nash, Richard Ash, Norm Schwartz, Robert Corish, Tammy Born, James P. Carter and Harold Lazarus

Healthcare is both the largest (17 + percent) and the most rapidly growing (three plus times the consumer product index (measure of inflation) and half a percent of gross…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare is both the largest (17 + percent) and the most rapidly growing (three plus times the consumer product index (measure of inflation) and half a percent of gross domestic product each year) segment of the US economy. The purpose of this paper is to focus on outcome successes that illustrate application of a previously reported health equation. The health equation allows an organized and more transparent assessment of healthcare outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach includes “end use/least cost” techniques that identifies healthful care as a big unmet need (BUN) and equally attractive business opportunity in identifying health promotion that improves outcome at lower net costs.

Findings

Opportunity exists to reduce costs while also reducing adverse events, healthcare morbidity and morality. Transparency is essential to find what works more effectively to yield desired outcomes. Metrics and measures, particularly more precise tools to assess true outcome in promoting health or managing ill health, are given priority as they allow quantified and, often econometric, outcome opportunities in the midst of current uncertainties.

Practical implications

This paper is for consumers and businesses, managers and administrators, professionals and allied health professionals. The successes described herein illustrate fundamental opportunities driving change and innovation within healthcare and in our society.

Originality/value

Attention is called to opportunity areas that can fund out of savings the transition from the authors' current “sickness care” system to a healthful care, proactive prevention approach to delivering care. Novel application of transparency and end use/least cost can help guide choices to achieve healthier outcomes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Susan Mitchell‐Ketzes

For many years, facility and real estate executives have focused on reducing workplace costs as the primary way to add value to their organisations. They have implemented…

Abstract

For many years, facility and real estate executives have focused on reducing workplace costs as the primary way to add value to their organisations. They have implemented a variety of measures over time to improve traditional facility metrics such as cost per person, cost per seat and area per person. As global businesses contend with a bewildering array of challenges such as the uncertain world economy, unstable and often plunging stock market values, terrorism and war, however, the search for leverage in every aspect of the organisation is relentless. More is being demanded, especially from workplace assets. The good news is that much more is possible. The concept of ‘workplace’ is being redefined to keep pace with changes in organisations, employees, technology, environmental sensitivity, culture and the nature of work itself. As the approach to workplace becomes more people‐centric and less place‐centric, what emerges is a new possibility for the workplace to be utilised as a strategic business tool. People are the key to business performance; the workplace can enable and catalyse people and the work they do. This paper deals with the process for linking workplace to business performance, key tools, innovative ways of measuring this linkage, and examples of the value a variety of organisations are achieving through their innovative workplace strategies. The paper is intended to provide real estate executives and facility managers with greater perspective on the contribution that the workplace can make to achieving business objectives. It will also explore ways of incorporating adaptability and flexibility into the design aspect of workplace strategies to achieve maximum velocity and return on investment. As organisations struggle to adapt to current business conditions, a high‐performance workplace is no longer simply a desirable long‐term goal; it may well be a key to survival.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Camille Kapoor and Nicole Solomon

The modern workplace now consists of four different generations for the first time in history. Each generation, Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation…

Abstract

Purpose

The modern workplace now consists of four different generations for the first time in history. Each generation, Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y, has been heavily influenced by the events of their time; this creates a new challenge for employers. Companies must make workplace adjustments in order to create a productive environment for all employees, regardless of their generation. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings of researchers interested in generational differences, workplace communication, management, diversity in the workplace, and many other topics were studied in the production of this piece.

Findings

This research shows that employers must identify the separate characteristics of each generation present in their workplace. Further, employers must foster a work environment that aids productivity for every generation; they must give their employees the information and skills needed to understand the generational characteristics of their co‐workers to create understanding among employees. Other steps that managers can take include mentor programs, generational diversity training, and enhanced communication methods designed to cater to each generation's preferences.

Originality/value

This literature review takes into account the findings of researchers who have studied the characteristics of each generation and the application of these characteristics in the workplace. The problem of a generationally diverse workplace is present in most companies today.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Eric Zimmerman and Judit Bar‐Ilan

The purpose of this paper is to look at measures of e‐mail use and e‐mail management among academic faculty in relation to research productivity. The aim is to report only…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at measures of e‐mail use and e‐mail management among academic faculty in relation to research productivity. The aim is to report only on e‐mail use and management.

Design/methodology/approach

For this quantitative study, productivity data were gathered from information management systems of Bar‐Ilan University in Israel and a survey questionnaire was distributed in order to measure e‐mail use. The scholarly community of Bar‐Ilan University was surveyed via a web‐form – of the 781 survey copies disseminated, 412 (52.8 per cent of the total) were received and the final usable number was 390 (49.9 per cent of the total).

Findings

With younger biological and/or professional age, there are correspondingly higher levels of e‐mail usage. It is clear that the younger a user is, the higher the perceived skill level and quantitative measures of e‐mail use, as well as a higher perception of one's capacity to use e‐mail. It would also seem that with older professional age, there is less perceived benefit to using e‐mail. With increased levels of perception as to the benefit of e‐mail to productivity, there is increased use of e‐mail.

Originality/value

This paper provides a depth of study (in its range of disciplines covered, in a single location, with a broad population) with a range of e‐mail measures not previously seen in this decade. While Israel is small in size, it accounts for 1 per cent of global scientific journal articles, emanating mainly from the universities and its achievements are such that the global community can indeed learn from the behaviour patterns of Israel's scholars, represented by the findings at one of the largest research universities.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Wing S. Chow

Recent supply chain literature are mainly concentrated on the quality of conventional supply chain information systems, the study on the e‐fulfillment has not been visibly…

Abstract

Recent supply chain literature are mainly concentrated on the quality of conventional supply chain information systems, the study on the e‐fulfillment has not been visibly noticeable. This paper uses factor analysis to determine four e‐fulfillment success factors: information quality, service quality, system quality, and work performance quality. Later, this paper uses discriminant analysis method to identify the key e‐fulfillment practices that the high satisfaction group would emphasize more than the low satisfaction group. A critical analysis of areas that require the improvement is also discussed.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Jonathan Liu, Ashok Srivastava and Hong Seng Woo

This paper presents the findings of a literature review and survey conducted on sport sponsorship in the UK. The paper seeks to establish relevant material published that…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a literature review and survey conducted on sport sponsorship in the UK. The paper seeks to establish relevant material published that addresses the issue of the transferability of techniques and skills from sports to business. The findings of the literature review highlighted the close relationship between the two mediums. The results of the sponsorship questionnaire showed evidence of the transference of mutually beneficial skills between the organisations offering the assistance, and the sporting organisation receiving the funding. The survey indicated that a majority of sports sponsoring organisations offered more than just monetary assistance to their beneficiaries. Sponsors also assisted with the management of specific events, and operated the complicated software and computer equipment required for the smooth running of the sporting activity. These organisations supplied the sports with key personnel, and highly skilled staff who were experts in their respective fields in marketing, public relations, corporate hospitality, and management.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Fiona Leverick, Dale Littler, Dominic Wilson and Margaret Bruce

There would appear to be a view in common currency that IT is revolutionizing marketing, offering the possibilities of enhanced operational efficiency, the facilitation of…

Abstract

There would appear to be a view in common currency that IT is revolutionizing marketing, offering the possibilities of enhanced operational efficiency, the facilitation of the development of innovative products and services as well as the potential for reconfiguring marketing in the organization. Addresses the manner in which IT has affected and may significantly affect marketing by references to an empirical study of the existing and projected impact of IT on marketing activities, as well as analysing the factors which are likely to facilitate or impede the process. IT can be the handmaiden to the erosion of marketing as a major organizational function, with many of the traditional customer oriented activities being more widely diffused throughout the organization. On the other hand, it may be that marketing retains its position by adopting the role of guardian of the customer orientation, taking responsibility for defining the form and content of information that is an acceptable basis for organizational discourse.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2014

Mary C. Hill and Jane Campbell

Many accounting departments have implemented assurance of learning (AoL) processes in the last few years because accreditation agencies have mandated it. In prior…

Abstract

Many accounting departments have implemented assurance of learning (AoL) processes in the last few years because accreditation agencies have mandated it. In prior articles, we described an early assessment process (Stivers, Campbell, & Hermanson, 2000), a revised assessment process, and a suggested systems-oriented methodology for implementing an AoL process (Hill & Campbell, 2007). The purpose of this article is to provide the post-implementation review of our revised AoL process. We evaluate whether the AoL process is meeting the users’ goals effectively and efficiently. To do this, we provide the feedback we received from our Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation visit, the results of a faculty survey, and some output from our AoL system. Our review indicates that while the AACSB accreditation team viewed our AoL process as a “best practice,” the faculty members evaluated the process less positively. Faculty members were concerned about the number and clarity of the learning goals, the usefulness of the information generated, and the cost/benefit of the process with respect to the time involved. We conclude that different goals for the AoL process, accountability versus course improvement, drive the difference in opinion between the accreditation team and the faculty. Changes in senior management in the college along with faculty opinions have led to significant changes in the college’s AoL process including changing the name from AoL to TLC (Teaching and Learning Community). The results of this research emphasize the importance of treating the AoL program as a dynamic process that must be periodically evaluated to determine if it is meeting the organizations’ goals for the process. If the AoL program is not meeting goals or costing too much to meet them, then it should be revised and improved.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-840-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 25000