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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Satu Tuomainen

The purpose of this paper is to describe a support course for English-medium instruction (EMI) which continues to expand in European higher education (HE). While the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a support course for English-medium instruction (EMI) which continues to expand in European higher education (HE). While the phenomenon of teaching through English is not novel, support for university teachers appears to remain limited despite recognised challenges of EMI such as language proficiency and pedagogical considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

In the course non-native university lecturers in Finland were provided a course to practice various elements of English for academic purposes and receive feedback on their teaching. A pre-course needs analysis was used to determine the main causes for EMI concerns with non-native lecturers, and which elements of English they wished to develop during the course. The course itself consisted of six joint meetings, followed by individual teaching demonstrations, and concluded with a post-course analysis.

Findings

Findings suggest that Finnish university lecturers were pre-course most concerned about the accuracy, fluency and pronunciation of their academic English. Based on the post-course analysis, the most beneficial elements of the EMI support course were the reflective discussions about EMI, the language practice and receiving individual feedback.

Practical implications

The study suggests that support courses for university lecturers involved with EMI should not cover only language but allow lecturers to share their concerns and experiences and to practice in authentic teaching situations in English.

Originality/value

This study describes a pedagogically effective method to assist and encourage lecturers in HE to the use of English in their instruction.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Najat AlSaied and Fokiya Akhtar

A variety of alternate technology-enhanced teaching approaches are now available to university students to broaden their learning experiences and complement conventional…

Abstract

Purpose

A variety of alternate technology-enhanced teaching approaches are now available to university students to broaden their learning experiences and complement conventional face-to-face teaching. This paper aims to outline a study conducted at an English Medium Instruction (EMI) University in the Arabian Gulf where students were studying media. The study explored an innovative teaching approach that sought to enhance the students’ interaction with mobile phone applications as part of their learning experiences during the course.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus of the study was on enhancing the students’ English writing skills such as vocabulary, spelling and grammar and on improving their technical skills such as in video production. The study collected both quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The results indicated that mobile phone applications were helpful in improving students’ journalistic writing skills where they had a good level of proficiency in English, more so than students with poor English who are more dependent on traditional learning methods. Students also benefitted from mobile phone video production workshops that were intensive and creative. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that courses and labs in media courses have skilled technicians that can train students in creative mobile phone video production while faculty members need to be trained and proactively encouraged to use mobile phones for teaching and learning purposes.

Originality/value

wBased on the results of this study, it is recommended that courses and labs in media courses have skilled technicians that can train students in creative mobile phone video production while faculty members need to be trained and proactively encouraged to use mobile phones for teaching and learning purposes.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2020

Po-Hsing Tseng, Nick Pilcher and Kendall Richards

Shipping courses contain much technical and specialist knowledge and present particular challenges for English medium instruction (EMI). This paper aims to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Shipping courses contain much technical and specialist knowledge and present particular challenges for English medium instruction (EMI). This paper aims to investigate both student perceptions of the importance and satisfaction level of EMI in shipping courses in higher education in Taiwan and the perceptions of expert stakeholders through qualitative interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

Importance-performance analysis (IPA) is used to gather data on participants’ perceptions of what is (un)important and (un)satisfactory. Based on past studies, four dimensions with 20 items were developed and 121 effective questionnaires were collected. Further, qualitative interviews with expert stakeholders (n = 9) are undertaken to gather data to contextualize and complement the quantitative student data.

Findings

Findings show students attributed high importance but low satisfaction to items such as course learning objectives and students’ English level, and low importance and high satisfaction to items such as electronic teaching platform and relevance of subject to practice. Factor analysis and cluster analysis were used to divide samples into three groups. Qualitative interview results confirm many of the quantitative findings but also show where some quantitative findings require more attention or investment when delivering EMI programmes.

Research limitations/implications

Questionnaire samples focus on university students. Other related field samples (e.g. EMI teachers, shipping teachers, English teachers, etc.) could be surveyed and compared in future studies. Qualitative interviews could also be expanded to other stakeholders such as government policymakers.

Practical implications

The findings of IPA in the shipping courses and the qualitative interviews can be used for both teaching design and implementation in related courses by university lecturers and other stakeholders (e.g. policy and decision-makers). Such approaches can enhance students’ learning motivation and teaching performance.

Social implications

This paper provides important guidance and diagnosis for how to introduce English teaching in shipping courses. Related courses can be further applied in higher education to popularize and promote EMI teaching in shipping and related fields.

Originality/value

EMI has seldom been studied in the context of shipping courses in the past. This paper adopts IPA method and qualitative interviews to complement previous studies and address gaps in recent research. It is expected that the research findings could be adapted and applied in other fields.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Po-Hsing Tseng, Kendall Richards and Nick Pilcher

This paper aims to use an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and combine this with the fuzzy theory to identify key indicators influencing English-medium instruction (EMI…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and combine this with the fuzzy theory to identify key indicators influencing English-medium instruction (EMI) in the shipping courses of Taiwan’s higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review and expert interviews, an evaluation model with 4 indicators and 13 sub-indicators was developed. Questionnaire samples included university English teachers (eight), university shipping teachers (nine) and shipping practitioners (eight).

Findings

Using 25 effective samples, the results found that “teachers’ characteristics” is the most important indicator, followed by “syllabus design”, “university resources” and “students’ characteristics”. Such a finding could provide valuable teaching and managerial strategies for EMI design in both university and industry sectors.

Research limitations/implications

Expert questionnaire targets have focused on university English teachers, university shipping teachers and shipping practitioners. Other related field experts could be further surveyed and compared in the future studies.

Practical implications

The findings of EMI indicators in the shipping courses could be used for course and material design by shipping companies, shipping authorities and universities. It is expected that these indicators could inform the provision of reasonable teaching resources allocation.

Social implications

This paper provides important guidance for designing EMI in shipping courses. Related stakeholders will be able to understand important concepts regarding designing EMI courses.

Originality/value

First, EMI indicators in the shipping courses have seldom been studied in the past. They are, however, important for both shipping industries and education intuitions. Second, as its method, this paper adopts decision analysis quantitative tool to complement previous qualitative studies regarding EMI studies.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Janina Brutt-Griffler

The shift in the function of English as a medium of instruction together with its use in knowledge construction and dissemination among scholars continue to fuel the…

Abstract

Purpose

The shift in the function of English as a medium of instruction together with its use in knowledge construction and dissemination among scholars continue to fuel the global demand for high-level proficiency in the language. These components of the global knowledge economy mean that the ability of nations to produce multilinguals with advanced English proficiency alongside their mastery of other languages has become a key to global competitiveness. That need is helping to drive one of the greatest language learning experiments the world has ever known. It carries significant implications for new research agendas and teacher preparation in applied linguistics.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence-based decision-making, whether it pertains to language policy decisions, instructional practices, teacher professional development or curricula/program building, needs to be based on a rigorous and systematically pursued program of research and assessment.

Findings

This paper seeks to advance these objectives by identifying new research foci that underscore a student-centered approach.

Originality/value

It introduces a new theoretical construct – multilingual proficiency – to underscore the knowledge that the learner develops in the process of language learning that makes for the surest route to the desired high levels of language proficiency. The paper highlights the advantages of a student-centered approach that focuses on multilingual proficiency for teachers and explores the concomitant conclusions for teacher development.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Birgit Brock-Utne

Through political decisions – in the North mostly willed decisions, in the South decisions forced on them by monetary institutions in the North – governments have…

Abstract

Through political decisions – in the North mostly willed decisions, in the South decisions forced on them by monetary institutions in the North – governments have dismantled national controls with capital movements, profits and foreign investments. By this willed or enforced political choice – the consequences of which has seldom been spelled out to the electorates – political leaders have removed those legal and administrative tools which might have protected local economic and social systems. Directed by Western interests the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund have used and continue to use their creditor powers to pressure first the poor debtor countries of the South and then the collapsing members of the former Soviet Union to turn their own battered economies into the same kind of unrestricted markets. Last but not the least the World Trade Organization (WTO) has become a vehicle for assuring that practically the whole world is opened for the unhindered operations of private capital. This ideology, which I here term globalization, leads to a democratic deficit, increases income differences and forces new groups into poverty.

Details

Power, Voice and the Public Good: Schooling and Education in Global Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-185-5

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Annette Bradford

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges facing Japanese institutions of higher education wishing to implement degree programs taught through the medium of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges facing Japanese institutions of higher education wishing to implement degree programs taught through the medium of English.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a comparative perspective in examining the rationales and policies for, and the challenges and successes associated with, the adoption of English-medium instruction (EMI) in Japan and in Europe, where EMI has a longer history. It uses government policy declarations and reports and synthesizes the research literature and information published by universities. Next, it investigates the practices that apply to the Japanese context and provides recommendations on the strategies that Japanese decision makers could adopt.

Findings

Japan does not share exactly the same rationales for adopting EMI as many European countries, however there is utility in looking to Europe for best practices. Japanese institutions of higher education can benefit from examining the linguistic, cultural and structural dilemmas that EMI poses.

Research limitations/implications

Documented evidence of the successful implementation of EMI programs is scarce, and therefore it is difficult to provide a comprehensive study of strategies that can be used to overcome the challenges which accompany EMI. This paper does not examine the introduction of EMI programs in Japan in relation to other Asian contexts.

Originality/value

As Japan is still in the early phases of introducing EMI programs, this paper provides valuable information for those involved in their implementation.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Anna Moni

With the increasing mobility of higher education students across the world, institutions and instructors are confronted with the need to mitigate the linguistic challenges…

Abstract

With the increasing mobility of higher education students across the world, institutions and instructors are confronted with the need to mitigate the linguistic challenges that multilingual students face in learning advanced content in universities or colleges where English or another language is the medium of instruction. This usually pertains to students who have low competence in the language of instruction, as it is a second or third foreign language for them, hence encountering difficulties in the mastery of discipline-specific content and knowledge. First and foremost, this chapter explores the specific linguistic barriers that multilingual students encounter in this context, which relate to several elements of communicative competence in the language of instruction, while investigating empirical studies on instructional strategies for multilingual classes. Secondly, it discusses the use of Merrill’s (2013) first principles of instruction as the main framework in the design of technology-enhanced lesson plans and in the selection implementation of technology-nested instructional strategies, which can assist instructors in creating linguistically inclusive learning environments across disciplines, while maintaining high academic standards. The chapter critically addresses the use of ICT tools in supporting instructional strategies and lesson plan design to mitigate students’ linguistic difficulties with the receptive and productive language skills within discipline-specific contexts. Finally, it provides a lesson plan template and examples encouraging instructors to carefully plan and design instruction and to experiment and monitor the outcomes in their classes.

Details

Technology-enhanced Learning and Linguistic Diversity: Strategies and Approaches to Teaching Students in a 2nd or 3rd Language
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-128-8

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Ida Fatimawati Adi Badiozaman, Hugh John Leong and Olivia Jikus

The purpose of this paper is to explore students’ perception and use of English in higher education (HE) institutions in Malaysia. In doing so, it aims to better…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore students’ perception and use of English in higher education (HE) institutions in Malaysia. In doing so, it aims to better understand the relationship between students’ perception of English and academic self-efficacy, particularly since English is used as a medium of instruction in HE institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Approximately, 980 questionnaires were distributed to four HE institutions to explore relationships and patterns of students perceived English language proficiency and academic self-efficacy as potential variables shaping their academic performance. About 838 students participated.

Findings

The findings revealed that although students did not rate their English proficiency very highly, they placed high value on English in regards to their academic performance and job prospects upon graduation. More importantly, the findings also show that the majority of the students had high academic self-efficacy beliefs in L2, and were more accurate at calibrating their efficacy beliefs with subsequent performance in academic settings, unlike typical research findings on Asian students as generally holding lower self-efficacy beliefs. This finding was evidenced by the strong and positive relationship between perceived English language competence and academic self-efficacy in L2.

Practical implications

It is imperative that students’ academic self-efficacy beliefs be enhanced as it has been revealed to mobilise motivation and cognitive resources. It is also necessary to offer targeted support services specifically designed to further help students to improve their English academic skills.

Originality/value

In this study, rewards offered by instrumental motivation in terms of increased academic literacy and career appear to supersede the motive of identification with the L2 language community. It is likely that students in Malaysian HE institutions are becoming increasingly motivated to study due to their own visions and desires, rather than as a result of external requirements. Such findings should be capitalised since self-efficacy is predictive of academic performance.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2019

Maria S. Plakhotnik and Natalia V. Volkova

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a perceived organizational culture on organizational identification and commitment of employees of a Russian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a perceived organizational culture on organizational identification and commitment of employees of a Russian university that is transforming to become an English-medium instruction (EMI) university.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected between February and March 2018, via an online survey that was disseminated among 115 new employees; 90 were completed and used for analyses. The survey included three scales.

Findings

Employees of the EMI university perceived its culture as market, which is not a common characteristic of universities that usually have a clan culture. The study has also demonstrated a discrepancy between the perceived (market) and the preferred (clan) organizational culture. The study has also showed that a clan, and not a market, culture strengthens employee organizational commitment and identification.

Originality/value

Most research has examined EMI universities from the perspectives of teaching and learning. This study contributes to the limited conceptual and theoretical base around these universities by examining their processes from a perspective of management. This paper suggests that the adoption of English as a medium of instruction requires organizational change that leads to change in organizational culture.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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