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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

B. Sharma and O.P. Gandhi

The lubricating oil is a non‐renewable source of energy and its useful life is limited due to deterioration during its usage. It is desirable to maximize its use to…

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1589

Abstract

Purpose

The lubricating oil is a non‐renewable source of energy and its useful life is limited due to deterioration during its usage. It is desirable to maximize its use to conserve this scarce resource. At present, continuation or change of the engine oil is decided, based on the manufacturer's recommendation and experience. The suggested engine oil change period is conservative and results in non‐efficient usage of engine oil. This practice needs refinement to include all possible properties/attributes of engine oil and use of appropriate procedure to assess its realistic performance. The paper aims to analyze the procedure.

Design/methodology/approach

Oil reliability polygraph is used to analyze the engine oil performance during operation. Reliability analysis of the engine oil is carried out by comparing the area of oil reliability polygraph at a given operation time with the area for the fresh engine oil. The suggested procedure is illustrated by means of an example.

Findings

Physical and chemical properties responsible for performance degradation of the engine oil are considered as engine oil reliability attributes. The value of these attributes from time to time, obtained by analyzing samples drawn from the system, is analyzed through oil reliability polygraph. In this approach, the engine oil reliability attributes at a given operation time are represented in terms of reliability value to obtain the “oil reliability polygraph”.

Originality/value

The suggested procedure will be helpful for maintenance personnel in taking planned maintenance action.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1967

Derek J. John

SUMMARY THE optimum powerplant for a Mach 2.2 transport aircraft is a turbojet. The Olympus 593, latest of a well‐proven family of twin spool, axial flow turbojets has…

Abstract

SUMMARY THE optimum powerplant for a Mach 2.2 transport aircraft is a turbojet. The Olympus 593, latest of a well‐proven family of twin spool, axial flow turbojets has been designed especially for installation in the Concorde. Invaluable development has been achieved from two 90% scale engines and the first seven full size engines. Satisfactory fuel and oils are now available for Concorde and the powerplant has already flown in a Vulcan flying test bed.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

David J. Smith

Spotlights that strategic alliances are widely used within the aerospace industry and the success of Europe’s Airbus Industrie consortium has been much publicized. Less…

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5184

Abstract

Spotlights that strategic alliances are widely used within the aerospace industry and the success of Europe’s Airbus Industrie consortium has been much publicized. Less well‐documented has been the success of some of Europe’s leading engineering companies, such as Rolls‐Royce, Daimler‐Benz and BMW, in supplying aero engines to the world’s airlines. Again collaborative ventures have played an important part in helping these firms to build market share within this highly competitive global market. Reviews the changes that have taken place within both the airframe and the engine sectors of the aerospace industry in recent years. Critically evaluates the part that strategic alliances have played in the increasing commercial success of the European Union in both sectors. Highlights differences in the nature and role of such alliances as well as their impact on the structure of each sector.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 97 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1987

Promavia's Jet Squalus F‐1300NGT flew for the first time near Milan, Italy, with a TFE109 engine from the Garrett Turbine Engine Company, Phoenix, Arizona. Reports from…

Abstract

Promavia's Jet Squalus F‐1300NGT flew for the first time near Milan, Italy, with a TFE109 engine from the Garrett Turbine Engine Company, Phoenix, Arizona. Reports from the first flight noted the exceptionally low sound level and excellent performance of the aircraft. The TFE109 is a derivative of the US Air Force's F109 engine currently in flight test.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 59 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1952

D.A.E. SMITH

The steam engine was the first practical means of producing mechanical power from the heat of combustion of a fuel, and its introduction was a vital factor in the progress…

Abstract

The steam engine was the first practical means of producing mechanical power from the heat of combustion of a fuel, and its introduction was a vital factor in the progress of the Industrial Revolution. For many years the development of the steam reciprocating engine continued apace, but in the early years of the present century introduction of the steam turbine and internal combustion engine made available alternative methods of power production. From then on interest in the steam reciprocating engine tended to slacken and, although it has shown a number of notable improvements, far more spectacular advances have been made in other power units.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1931

D.R. Pye

The high‐speed engine cannot compete with these fuel consumptions on a b.h.p. basis, but on a basis of indicated power there is little to choose, under optimum conditions…

Abstract

The high‐speed engine cannot compete with these fuel consumptions on a b.h.p. basis, but on a basis of indicated power there is little to choose, under optimum conditions, as is seen by comparison of the data in Figs. 7 and 8.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Yuh‐Yih Wu and Mu‐Jung Kao

Nanoparticles have been studied as additives to lubrication oils for reducing friction and wear. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of nanofluid on…

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3677

Abstract

Purpose

Nanoparticles have been studied as additives to lubrication oils for reducing friction and wear. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of nanofluid on engine oil and friction reduction in a real engine.

Design/methodology/approach

The nanoparticles were prepared using a high‐temperature arc in a vacuum chamber to vaporize the Ti metal, and then condensed into a dispersant to form the TiO2 nanofluid, which was used as lubricant additive. Experiments were performed in both real engine running and test rig.

Findings

It was found that the engine oil with nanofluid additive with an ethylene glycol dispersant of nanoparticles, had gelled after 10‐h of engine running. The problem of oil gelation (jelly‐like) was solved by replacing the dispersant with paraffin oil. The engine oil with TiO2 nanoparticle additive exhibited lower friction force as compared to the original oil. The experiment showed that a smaller particle size exhibits better friction reduction with particle size ranging from 59 to 220 nm.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is restricted to findings based on the dispersed nanoparticles in fluid as additive for engine lubrication oil.

Practical implications

The test results are useful for the application of nanofluid additive for engine oil.

Originality/value

Most previous researches in this field were executed on tribotester, rather than the actual engine. This paper describes experimental methods and equipment designed to investigate the application of TiO2 nanofluid as lubricant additive in internal combustion engine.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 63 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Wieńczysław Stalewski and Jerzy Żółtak

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the preliminary design and optimization of the air-intake system and the engine nacelle. The work was conducted as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the preliminary design and optimization of the air-intake system and the engine nacelle. The work was conducted as part of an integration process of a turboprop engine in a small aircraft in a tractor configuration.

Design/methodology/approach

The preliminary design process was performed using a parametric, interactive design approach. The parametric model of the aircraft was developed using the PARADES™ in-house software. The model assumed a high level of freedom concerning shaping all the components of aircraft important from the point of view of the engine integration. Additionally, the software was used to control the fulfillment of design constraints and to analyze selected geometrical properties. Based on the developed parametric model, the preliminary design was conducted using the interactive design and optimization methodology. Several concepts of the engine integration were investigated in the process. All components of the aircraft propulsion system were designed simultaneously to ensure their compliance with each other.

Findings

The concepts of the engine integration were modified according to changes in the design and technological constraints in the preliminary design process. For the most promising configurations, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations were conducted using commercial Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes solver FLUENT™ (ANSYS). The simulations tested the flow around the nacelle and inside the air-delivery system which consists of the air-intake duct, the foreign-particles separator and the auxiliary ducts delivering air to the cooling and air-conditioning systems. The effect of the working propeller was modeled using the Virtual Blade Model implemented in the FLUENT code. The flow inside the air-intake system was analyzed from the point of view of minimization of pressure losses in the air-intake duct, the quality of air stream delivered to the engine compressor and the effectiveness of the foreign particles separator.

Practical implications

Based on results of the CFD analyses, the final concept of the turboprop engine integration has been chosen.

Originality/value

The presented results of preliminary design process are valuable to achieve the final goal in the ongoing project.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology: An International Journal, vol. 86 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1962

F.W.W. Morley

IN this Paper an endeavour is made to indicate the way in which design has progressed from the complex military piston engine, through the elegant simplicity of a new…

Abstract

IN this Paper an endeavour is made to indicate the way in which design has progressed from the complex military piston engine, through the elegant simplicity of a new prime mover and then, as technical progress showed how it could be improved, on to the complex modern gas turbine engine.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1930

W.L. Cowley

IN order to obtain machines of large carrying capacity, there is a tendency to increase the number of power units, and it is of great interest to consider the effect of…

Abstract

IN order to obtain machines of large carrying capacity, there is a tendency to increase the number of power units, and it is of great interest to consider the effect of this policy upon safety in flight. It is obvious that, if all the power units are of the same construction, the possibility of failure of one engine in a machine fitted with two engines is twice that in a machine fitted with one engine, so that in general the probability of one unit going out of action in a multi‐engined machine is proportional to the number of power units employed. In the case of a single‐engined machine horizontal flight cannot be maintained after the engine fails, and unless the failure occurs in the vicinity of a safe landing ground disaster may result. In the case of a multi‐engined machine, however, if level flight can be maintained on the power obtainable from the remaining units, it may bo possible to arrive at a safe landing ground without further trouble. The question, therefore, arises as to which factor is the more important, the increase in the probability of failure, or the ability to fly level with an engine out of action.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 2 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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