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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Johann C.K.H. Riedel and Kulwant S. Pawar

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production…

Abstract

Reports on research based on the results of a survey of design management in the UK mechanical engineering industry. Considers the issue of which aspects of production were considered in the design of products and when. Demonstrates that at the prototype stage production aspects became the most important. This shows that the manufacturability of the product is not considered until after it has been designed. Concludes that the effective and efficient manufacture of the product is not given sufficient attention by mechanical engineering firms. Also investigates the involvement of production personnel in the design process. Finds that production engineering was more extensively involved in the design process the closer it moved towards manufacture. Points to further research which hopes to address this lack by providing practical tools for the application of concurrent engineering.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

P.E.D. LOVE, J. SMITH, G.J. TRELOAR and H. LI

Architectural and engineering firms (design firms) have eschewed implementing quality assurance (QA) and other subsequent aspects of quality such as continuous…

Abstract

Architectural and engineering firms (design firms) have eschewed implementing quality assurance (QA) and other subsequent aspects of quality such as continuous improvement. Their reluctance to embrace QA has been found to be a contributing factor in the production of poor quality contract documentation. Missing, conflicting and erroneous information contained within contract documentation are major sources of rework and customer dissatisfaction in construction projects. If design firms are to significantly improve the quality of the service they provide, they should implement ISO 9000 quality management and assurance standards. By implementing such standards, it is suggested that design firms will be able to contribute more effectively to the value adding process in the construction supply chain. It is argued that the service offered by design firms should be viewed as a key component of value that drives its success. Therefore, because rework is a major source of dissatisfaction in projects, a case study was used to determine how its occurrence inhibited value creation and thus the quality of service provided. From the case study findings, the need for design firms to implement ISO 9000 quality management and assurance standards so as to improve their service quality is discussed.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Lianying Zhang and Hui Sun

Knowledge contribution loafing as one of the major obstacles to knowledge sharing among designers in engineering design firms impedes better achievement of engineering

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge contribution loafing as one of the major obstacles to knowledge sharing among designers in engineering design firms impedes better achievement of engineering design. The purpose of this paper is to examine different types of ethical climate impacts on knowledge contribution loafing among designers through the mediating effect of knowledge leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting a quantitative research design, data were collected using a survey questionnaire from 352 designers in engineering design firms. The data were analyzed using the partial-least squares structural equation modeling approach to test hypotheses.

Findings

Ethical climate is an important factor to affect knowledge contribution loafing among designers, and three types of ethical climate (self-interest, social responsibility and law/professional codes) have different degrees of influence on knowledge contribution loafing. In addition, knowledge leadership can alleviate knowledge contribution loafing, and it is a mediator between ethical climate and knowledge contribution loafing.

Practical implications

Engineering design firms should cultivate and strengthen the role of social responsibility, law/professional codes and knowledge leadership and reduce the influence of self-interest to mitigate the negative of knowledge contribution loafing among designers.

Originality/value

By identifying ethical climate as a novel influence factor for knowledge contribution loafing, this research further highlights the role of different types of ethical climate in an engineering design context. Moreover, it delves deeply into the issue around different types of ethical climate affect knowledge contribution loafing among designers through the role of knowledge leadership. This broadens the understanding of how ethical climate affects knowledge contribution loafing among designers in the engineering design organizations and enriches knowledge management literatures in engineering design industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

J.K. Yates

The purpose of this article is to provide scenarios for the incorporation of sustainable waste minimisation strategies that were determined during a research project that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide scenarios for the incorporation of sustainable waste minimisation strategies that were determined during a research project that investigated sustainable engineering and construction processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research included a thorough review of sustainable engineering and construction practices throughout the world and the collection of additional information from high‐level executives from some of the top ranked global engineering and construction firms. The research was limited to collecting data from high‐level engineering and construction executives since they were the most knowledgeable about the use of sustainable strategies within their firm.

Findings

The results determined the main types of construction waste and sustainable strategies that could be used to minimise the amount of waste generated by the construction industry.

Research limitations/implications

he research was limited to collecting data from high‐level engineering and construction executives since they were the most knowledgeable about the use of sustainable strategies within their firms. The research could affect members of the engineering and construction industry, since it provides methods for implementing sustainable strategies that help to reduce the amount of waste generated by the construction industry.

Originality/value

The research is unique because it addressed waste minimisation strategies for the building construction industry and for the industrial and heavy/highway construction industries.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Samar K. Mukhopadhyay and Anil V. Gupta

Marketing‐manufacturing interface is becoming an increasingly important research area, as the firms unable to reduce inter‐departmental conflict find their global…

Abstract

Marketing‐manufacturing interface is becoming an increasingly important research area, as the firms unable to reduce inter‐departmental conflict find their global competitiveness compromised. Due to inevitable interaction of marketing and manufacturing with design engineering in conflict and resolution, there is a need to increase the scope of the research area of manufacturing‐marketing interface to include design (engineering) and establish appropriate interfaces between each pair of these domains. Some firms are practising concurrent engineering to minimise the conflict between design and manufacturing departments. Several interface variables can be used to resolve inter‐departmental conflict. A firm’s decision to pursue a particular interface requires commitment, investment and change in culture. What type of interface should a firm choose? This paper introduces a conceptual framework to resolve this dilemma. Specifically, the contribution of this paper is at least threefold. First, it characterises the possible conflicts that can arise due to interaction between the three functional areas – marketing, manufacturing, and design. Design is recognised as a separate function in its own right. Second, it identifies and describes possible variables that can be utilised as interfaces to resolve conflicts. Third, it establishes a methodology to develop a framework to assess inter‐departmental conflict and identify an optimal mix of interface variables to resolve all possible conflicts. The paper concludes with an actual case study involving a global marketing‐manufacturing company and provides an application of this framework and methodology.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Rateb Sweis, Nasser AL-Huthaifi, Afnan Alawneh, Wassim Albalkhy, Taghrid Suifan and Raeda Saa'da

This paper aims at studying the level of implementation of ISO 9001 in Jordanian consulting engineering firms and to what extent does the implementation effectiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at studying the level of implementation of ISO 9001 in Jordanian consulting engineering firms and to what extent does the implementation effectiveness affect the success of the construction projects. Moreover, the paper seeks to identify the Critical Success Factors (CSFs) that directly influence the ISO 9001 effectiveness in Jordanian consulting engineering firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was constructed and distributed to a sample of 125 employees from six ISO 9001-consulting firms. After collecting the data, exploratory factor analysis was utilized to validate the latent constructs (CSFs, ISO 9001 Effectiveness, and Firm Performance).

Findings

The findings suggest that firms experience a high level of ISO 9001 effectiveness. Moreover, among the five identified CSFs; employee attributes, external environmental pressure and quality system attribute had a significant impact on the ISO 9001 effectiveness, while internal motivation and firm attributes were insignificant.

Originality/value

The significance of this study lies in exploring such topic in the developing countries, since most of current studies were focused on developed contexts such as the USA and UK. Therefore, this research acts as a response to calls in the current literature regarding considering different industries and contexts.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Kriengsak Panuwatwanich, Rodney A. Stewart and Sherif Mohamed

The paper is an extension to a previous empirical study that models the process of innovation diffusion in Australian architectural and engineering design (AED) firms

Abstract

Purpose

The paper is an extension to a previous empirical study that models the process of innovation diffusion in Australian architectural and engineering design (AED) firms. This paper aims to utilise explanatory case studies to assist in the verification of this empirical model that depicts pathways that explain the role of enabling “climate for innovation” constructs in determining the level of innovation diffusion outcomes (IDO), and subsequent business performance (BPM) in Australian AED firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the latter of a two‐stage sequential mixed method research design: quantitative empirical study; and qualitative explanatory case studies. Specifically, this stage extracts findings from five explanatory case studies using a qualitative pattern matching analysis technique. Interview‐based data collected from the case studies are analysed to formulate the relationship patterns between constructs, which are then compared with those predicted by the empirical model. This approach affords a determination on the extent to which the case‐based findings (i.e. work‐setting phenomena) explains (i.e. validated) the empirical model.

Findings

The results of the case studies on five Australian AED firms indicate that the model can be adequately explained by the actual phenomena. This is evident in four of the cases providing a good to perfect match, and one showing a partial match to the predicted patterns of relationships between the model constructs. Thus, the paper presents verified empirical pathways for AED firms, which suggest that, by increasing the level of leadership for innovation, the level of team climate and organisational culture for innovation can be improved. The improved culture for innovation will then heighten the level of IDO, which can in turn, result in an enhanced BPM.

Originality/value

This paper expands and improves upon the current understanding of how the diffusion of innovation can be accelerated within the AED firm context. By focusing on the socio‐psychological processes, the paper depicts the pathways to improve IDO and BPM through fostering a robust climate for innovation. These pathways have been constructed empirically and are verified in this paper under real‐work settings. Based on the validated model and the specific insights derived from the explanatory case studies, the paper also highlights a number of strategic implications for AED firms seeking to enhance their BPM through improving innovation diffusion practices.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Branco Ponomariov and Gordon Kingsley

This paper explores changes in the attitudes of managers at a state transportation agency towards working with professional service consultants over time. The development…

Abstract

This paper explores changes in the attitudes of managers at a state transportation agency towards working with professional service consultants over time. The development of a relational orientation amongst agency managers is explored, i.e. managerial styles recognizing greater interdependence and emphasizing trust, partnership and collaboration over formal procedures and monitoring. Case studies of two points in time (2003 and 2007) are presented using semi-structured interviews and survey data. The evidence demonstrates growing patterns of interdependence and the structural and procedural adaptations made by the agency. Corresponding difference in means tests demonstrate patterns of change in relational orientation over time.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

J.S. Busby

Investigates the feedback to product designers of engineering and production costs in five industrial equipment firms. Reports that, despite the ubiquity of cost as an…

Abstract

Investigates the feedback to product designers of engineering and production costs in five industrial equipment firms. Reports that, despite the ubiquity of cost as an important design criterion, and the role that feedback should play in both individual and organizational learning, there were several significant problems: (1) Cost feedback was given as the difference between outcome and estimate in order to remove the effect of external factors, but this feedback then confounded the performance of estimation and design activities. (2) Distributional information in historical cost feedback was usually overlooked. The result was an excessive attention to detailed planning, consistent under‐estimation, and persistently negative feedback. (3) Designers and supervisors disagreed about the predictability of costs. Supervisors drew stronger inferences from feedback because they believed particular outcomes were more representative. (4) Engineering cost outcomes had poor reliability owing to the incentives to smooth cost discrepancies over different elements of the design; as a result it was unclear which were the problematic elements and opportunities were lost for calibrating the estimating process. This calibration also suffered from cost measurements being made at a higher level of aggregation than cost estimates. (5) The considerable delays between making design decisions and observing cost outcomes made it hard to learn cost‐effective design strategies through experience. There were instances where designers simply never found out how much it cost to engineer and produce their designs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Serdar Ulubeyli and Dilek Yorulmaz

The purpose of this paper is to report the possible impact of intellectual capital (IC) on firm reputation (FR) and investigates if there is a relationship between FR and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the possible impact of intellectual capital (IC) on firm reputation (FR) and investigates if there is a relationship between FR and market internationalization (MI).

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from engineering consultancy firms (ECFs) in Turkey. The study employed structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized relationships between IC, FR, and MI of ECFs.

Findings

ECFs with strong human and structural capital can have a good FR. However, healthy relational capital may not lead to the same effect on FR. On the contrary, FR can create high-quality relational capital for ECFs. Lastly, a good FR, based on robust human and structural capital, can provide the success of ECFs’ MI process.

Research limitations/implications

This model may be analyzed for other knowledge-intensive business services. Also, subsequent researches may investigate potential variations in results about other sectors and geographical areas. Moreover, various constructs may be included in the model. However, a greater number of samples could lead to distinctive outcomes.

Practical implications

The research may be a general guide for related professionals and their companies to build long-term strategies, given IC, FR and MI. In this respect, they should take into account human and structural capital for MI.

Social implications

ECFs that can be active in the international arena may maintain their services by financial sustainability. Thus, the advantage may result in a prosperous society.

Originality/value

The study is first to suggest a model joining IC and FR for the MI process of ECFs. This is suitable for competition of ECFs that are willing to be sustainable firms.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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