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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1968

P.J. Johnson

IN recent years there have been many papers covering the choice of powerplant for the supersonic transport aeroplane and several relating specifically to the Concorde. The…

Abstract

IN recent years there have been many papers covering the choice of powerplant for the supersonic transport aeroplane and several relating specifically to the Concorde. The subjects which have been covered include the choice of engine cycle, development history, propulsion controls and other design aspects. In the majority of these papers the environmental conditions which the supersonic engine experiences have been stressed but only brief references have been made to the ways and means whereby these conditions can be simulated on the test bed or in altitude test facilities.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Bilsen Beşergil, M. Sabih Özer, Mustafa Eskici and Enver Atik

This paper aims to determine the usage time of the test lubricant N0, prepared from base oils of Aliaga Plant, Izmir, in gasoline and diesel‐engines, and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the usage time of the test lubricant N0, prepared from base oils of Aliaga Plant, Izmir, in gasoline and diesel‐engines, and the investigations of high‐temperature oxidation, engine‐protective properties, and property changes of the lubricant in performance time.

Design/methodology/approach

Physical and chemical properties of the lubricating oil were initially established, and the oil was then subjected to Petter W‐1 gasoline and Petter AV‐1 diesel test engines. Dismantling of the engine parts was followed by the examination of pistons, piston rings and bearings, and analysis of the lubricant was also undertaken. The engine performance test results and the quality control of the lubricating oil assessments were evaluated according to the International Engine Lubricant Specifications.

Findings

The lubricating oil, under sluggish experimental conditions, appears to meet a 40‐hour test in gasoline engines and a 120‐hour test in diesel engines with the specifications. This means that under usual working conditions the lubricants keep the engine protective properties in 7,000 km distance for gasoline run‐vehicles, and in 5,000 km distance for diesel run‐vehicles, after which change of the oil is required.

Originality/value

The paper provides information of value to those involved with lubrication and engine performance.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1970

THE Rolls‐Royce RB.211 advanced technology turbofan for the Lockheed L‐1011 TriStar has been designed from the outset for case of maintenance by the embodiment of modular…

Abstract

THE Rolls‐Royce RB.211 advanced technology turbofan for the Lockheed L‐1011 TriStar has been designed from the outset for case of maintenance by the embodiment of modular construction and development testing at Hucknall and Derby is confirming the inherent advantages of its three‐shaft layout for large high bypass ratio propulsion systems.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 42 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Zhongping Tang, Zhengwen Feng, Peng Jin, Xisheng Fu and Hua Chen

The purpose of this paper is to identify the feature of soot in diesel engine oil and provide a method to stably disperse these soots using effect additives which is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the feature of soot in diesel engine oil and provide a method to stably disperse these soots using effect additives which is benefical for lubricants to pass related engine tests.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper designed experiments to investigate the dispersant type, treat level and different dispersant interactions which influence on lubricant soot-related viscosity increase. The research work developed an effective dispersant package which can well solve the soot-related viscosity increase, allowing pass Mack T-11 and Mack T-8 engine tests and demonstrated the helpfulness of using a quickly screening method developed by a steel piston diesel engine CA 6DL2-35.

Findings

The effect of dispersant treat level on the viscosity increase of the oil samples was negligible. Dispersant booster can effectively improve the soot handling ability of heavy-duty diesel engine oils (HDDEO), and the appropriate treat level of dispersant booster can help HDDEO pass Mack T-8 and Mack T-11 engine tests.

Practical implications

The test results are useful for formulators to select the appropriate dispersants or dispersant booster to develop the HDDEO packages which can meet the modern diesel engine lubrication requirements.

Originality/value

Most previous studies in this field were carried out on soot formation mechanism and soot-related wear rather than how to solve the soot-related viscosity increasing of HDDEO. This paper describes the soot dispersing requirements of different HDDEO specifications and developed an effective dispersant package which can well deal with Mack T-11 and Mack T-8E standard engine tests soot handling ability requirements.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 69 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

George Dawson

ENGINE testing has never been a subject to take for granted. Even thirty years ago, when test facilities were far from the sophisticated entities they are today, aerospace…

Abstract

ENGINE testing has never been a subject to take for granted. Even thirty years ago, when test facilities were far from the sophisticated entities they are today, aerospace engineers were well aware of the necessity of regular testing. Then, as now, it not only ensured air worthiness but it also extended the flying life of the engine.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1949

HELEN SELLEI

The use of “preservative” motor oils was a development of the recent war. The need for rust prevention has been recognised for many years, but only in the last decade were…

Abstract

The use of “preservative” motor oils was a development of the recent war. The need for rust prevention has been recognised for many years, but only in the last decade were efforts concentrated to prevent rusting in an efficient and scientific way. Engine oil specifications have changed during the past ten years to comply with the higher requirements resulting from changes in engine design. The preservative type motor oils, which were developed during the same period, must meet these more rigid specifications and also act as corrosion preventives. Engine Preservative Oils serve the double function of preservation and lubrication. As a preservative, the oil should fully protect steel or any other metal which may be found in an engine assembly, whether the engine is stored or in operation. As a lubricant, it must comply with the exacting requirements set for automotive and aircraft engines. Because of the complexity of aircraft motors, specifications are generally more severe for aircraft than automotive engine preservatives. Illustrations of these specifications are presented for automotive oils, and only reference will be made to aircraft oils. Film forming engine preservatives, as required by the U.S. Bureau of Ships, will not be discussed because of lack of oily constituents.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1933

D.R. Pye

This paper was read before the World Petroleum Congress on July 19, 1933. Mr. Pye acted as chairman of a committee set up by the Institution of Petroleum Technologists to…

Abstract

This paper was read before the World Petroleum Congress on July 19, 1933. Mr. Pye acted as chairman of a committee set up by the Institution of Petroleum Technologists to investigate the corelation of knock‐rating as determined in a test engine with the results obtained using aero‐engine cylinders. This paper prepared by him summarises the results of the committee's investigations

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1957

Previous work has suggested that the adhesion between oil and metallic surfaces of an engine could be an important factor in determining crankcase cleanliness. It can be…

Abstract

Previous work has suggested that the adhesion between oil and metallic surfaces of an engine could be an important factor in determining crankcase cleanliness. It can be shown that it is only necessary to measure the spreading pressure of an oil on metal in order to get a direct measure of the work of adhesion, Surface tensions of lubrictaing oils vary very little and it can be assumed that the critical film pressure (C.F.P.) obtained with a given apparatus is an acceptable measure of the work of adhesion as well as of the spreading pressure. Oils of similar properties may vary tenfold in their C.F.P's. The addition of additives influences the spreading pressure, the largest increments in C.F.P. being given by dispersant and detergent additives.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 9 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1953

The Symposium on Engine Testing of Lubricating Oil was organized by the Institute of Petroleum and held in the Institution of Mechanical Engineers' Lecture Room, London…

Abstract

The Symposium on Engine Testing of Lubricating Oil was organized by the Institute of Petroleum and held in the Institution of Mechanical Engineers' Lecture Room, London, on April 22nd, under the Chairmanship of Mr. C. B. Dicksee (Ex‐Chairman of Automobile Division, I.Mech.E.). More than 300 members were present. The following are shortened versions of all papers presented.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1949

REFERENCE was made in the Editorial of our last issue to the new test engine built by Ricardo and Co. (Engineers 1927) Ltd., of Shoreham, to the specification laid down by…

Abstract

REFERENCE was made in the Editorial of our last issue to the new test engine built by Ricardo and Co. (Engineers 1927) Ltd., of Shoreham, to the specification laid down by the Institute of Petroleum. This engine has been tested at the Tho nton Research Centre and was exhibited on the Stand of Shell Mex and B.P. Ltd. at the Engineering and Marine Exhibition at Olympia. We have already stressed the importance of standardizing a British Test Engine for carrying out tests on internal combustion engine lubricating oils. We give below details of this engine with illustrations taken at Thornton.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 1 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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