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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Wen Pan Fagerlin and Yueqi Wang

The purpose of this study is to map different kinds of tensions in product innovation and investigate how top managers use communication to shape subordinates' attention…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to map different kinds of tensions in product innovation and investigate how top managers use communication to shape subordinates' attention and thereby respond to these tensions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted an embedded case study of four innovation centers within a Nordic multinational firm.

Findings

This study identifies three kinds of tensions that reside in product innovation, namely dilemma, paradox and trade-off. Further, this study reveals how joint attention (among top managers and subordinates) as a response to tensions can be achieved through different aggregates of top managers' communication efforts.

Originality/value

In opening the black box of tensions in product innovation and identifying multiple tensions, this study contributes to advancing the understanding of the attention-based view. Different from previous studies that simply consider communication as channels for information processing, the findings indicate that the contents and practices of communication can help top managers to shape subordinates' attention and thereby respond to tensions. This study also extends the research focus of attention from top managers to the whole organization, by revealing the importance of building a joint pattern of attention among top managers and subordinates.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2020

Zhan Xu

Natural disasters are increasingly more frequent and intense, which makes it critical for emergency managers to engage social media users during crises. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

Natural disasters are increasingly more frequent and intense, which makes it critical for emergency managers to engage social media users during crises. This study examined emergency official accounts' social media engagement at each disaster stage based on Fink's four-stage model of crisis and disaster: prodromal, acute, chronic and termination stages and linked topics and sentiments to engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Using text mining and sentiment analysis, 1,226 original tweets posted by 66 major emergency official Twitter accounts and more than 15,000 retweets elicited across the life cycle of Hurricane Irma were analyzed.

Findings

Results identified the most engaging official accounts and tweets. Most tweets and the most engaging tweets were posted in the prodromal stage. Tweets related to certain topics were significantly more engaging than others. The most frequently tweeted topics by official accounts were less engaging than some seldom tweeted topics. Negative sentiment words increased the engagingness of the tweet. Sadness was the strongest predictor of tweet engagement. Tweets that contained fewer sadness words were more engaging. Fear was stronger in positively predicting tweet engagement than anger. Results also demonstrated that words for fear and anger were critical in engaging social media discussions in the prodromal stage. Words for sadness made the tweets less engaging in the chronic stage.

Originality/value

This study provided detailed instructions on how to increase the engagingness of emergency management official accounts during disasters using computational methods. Findings have practical implications for both emergency managers and crisis researchers.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Juan-Antonio Martinez-Comeche and Ian Ruthven

The aim of this exploratory study is to analyze if the most used factors related to the engaging interaction and long-term engagement with online applications can be…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this exploratory study is to analyze if the most used factors related to the engaging interaction and long-term engagement with online applications can be applied to WhatsApp in a context of everyday life in Madrid and to investigate what parameters would best describe the engagement with WhatsApp in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative method was employed to explore the cognitive, emotional and behavioral factors that mainly comprise the experience of a user with an online application, both at a point in time and over time. Data from 30 semi-structured interviews and questionnaires from six group chats were collected and analyzed. The sample was made up of people aged from 13 to 58 years old.

Findings

Findings suggest that the factors used in this study to evaluate long-term engagement and engaging interactions with WhatsApp are relevant, except for cognitive factors related to engaging interactions, indicating that the cognitive point of view is more difficult to apply in the engaging interaction analysis. Other attributes related to information retrieval are suggested, best suited to the informative use of this tool.

Originality/value

Long-term engagement studies are scarcer concerning Mobile Instant Messaging applications. Regarding engagement interaction, its analysis focusing on WhatsApp has not been approached. This study suggests the convenience of using parameters related to information to evaluate the engaging interaction, according to the informative use of the application.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Suresh Cuganesan and Clinton Free

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system (MCS) changes that were new public management (NPM) inspired.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a longitudinal case study of a large Australian state police department utilizing an abductive research design.

Findings

The authors found that identification processes strongly conditioned the reception of the MCS changes introduced. Initially, the authors observed mixed interpretations of controls as both enabling and coercive. Over time, these changes were seen to be coercive because they threatened interpersonal relationships and the importance and efficacy of squads in combating serious and organized crime.

Research limitations/implications

The authors contributed to MCSs literature by revealing the critical role that multifaceted relational and collective identification processes played in shaping interpretations of controls as enabling–coercive. The authors build on this to elaborate on the notion of employees’ centricity in the MCS design.

Practical implications

This study suggests that, in complex organizational settings, the MCS design and change should reckon with pre-existing patterns of employees’ identification.

Originality/value

The authors suggested shifting the starting point for contemplating the MCS change: from looking at how what employees do is controlled to how the change impacts and how employees feel about who they are. When applied to the MCS design, employee centricity highlights the value of collaborative co-design, attentiveness to relational identification between employees, feedback and interaction in place of inferred management expectations and traditional mechanistic approaches.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Theresa M. Glomb

Although researchers have suggested that aggression is multiply determined, most studies examine only a small set of predictors, focusing on either situational or…

Abstract

Although researchers have suggested that aggression is multiply determined, most studies examine only a small set of predictors, focusing on either situational or individual or reciprocal motives. Research has not studied extensively the relative strength of multiple antecedent sets. Using questionnaire data (n = 366), the current study examines eleven antecedents of employees engaging in aggression: situational antecedents (i.e., procedural, distributive, and interpersonal justice; organizational, work group, and job related stress), individual difference antecedents (i.e., Type A behavior, trait anger, reactions to anger), and reciprocal effects (i.e., being the target of aggression). Individual difference antecedents and being the target of aggression influence the frequency with which employees report engaging in aggression. Situational antecedents are not significant predictors once other antecedents are taken into account.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Charlotte M. Karam and Fida Afiouni

The purpose of this paper is to explore how public (i.e. culture, state, paid work) and private (i.e. household) patriarchal structures work to shape a woman’s own…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how public (i.e. culture, state, paid work) and private (i.e. household) patriarchal structures work to shape a woman’s own legitimacy judgments concerning not engaging in paid work. The authors trace the intersection and interaction of legitimacy logics at both the collective (i.e. validity) and individual (i.e. propriety) levels, thereby gaining a better contextual understanding of each woman’s perception of career opportunities and limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methodology drawing from 35 semi-structured interviews with Lebanese women. A multilevel analytic framework combining the institutional structures of private and public patriarchy with the micro-processes of institutional logics is used.

Findings

Legitimization of (not) engaging in paid work is often tied to patriarchal logics that favor private sphere responsibilities for women, particularly related to the relational and instrumental logics of childrearing and husband-oriented responsibilities. Women’s legitimacy judgment formation seems to be based on multilevel cues and on differential instances of evaluative vs passive judgment formation. Some appear to passively assume the legitimacy of the logics; while others more actively question these logics. The findings suggest that active questioning is often overwhelmed by the negative and harsh realities making the woman succumb to passivity and choosing not to engage in paid work.

Originality/value

This study provides: a better mapping of the individual woman’s daily cognitions concerning the legitimacy of (not) engaging in paid work; and a unique multilevel analytic framework that can serve as a useful example of contextualizing career research.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2020

Wouter Robijn, Martin C. Euwema, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jana Deprez

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic needs satisfaction between these relations is proposed based on self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was used with 133 employees who rated their leader, their team and their own basic need satisfaction and engagement to analyze the direct and indirect effects simultaneously.

Findings

The analysis confirmed that both engaging leadership and open conflict norms had an indirect effect on work engagement through basic needs satisfaction. Furthermore, engaging leadership was positively related with open conflict norms.

Research limitations/implications

The current study adds to the validation of engaging leadership as it confirms that engaging leaders strengthen work engagement through basic need satisfaction. Furthermore, it shows that not only the leader is important, but the team can impact their well-being through the creation of other social resources as open conflict norms.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence that not only leaders are important to increase work engagement through basic needs satisfaction but also other social resources, such as conflict management. This offers a brand new perspective and opportunities on how to increase work engagement using social resources as conflict management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2009

John Alban‐Metcalfe and Beverly Alimo‐Metcalfe

Part one of this paper draws a distinction between the concepts of the personal qualities and values required of those occupying a leadership role, leadership…

Abstract

Part one of this paper draws a distinction between the concepts of the personal qualities and values required of those occupying a leadership role, leadership competencies, and engaging leadership behaviour. On the basis of reviews of the literature and survey, empirical and case study data, it concludes that personal qualities and values, and leadership competencies are necessary, but not sufficient, for effective leadership. Part two goes on to consider the relationship between leader development and leadership development, and to present a ‘mental model’, which seeks to integrate these three concepts and to relate them to the distinction between leader behaviour and leadership behaviour, as well as the development of human and social capital.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Wei Lian Tan

E-learning has the potential to engage learners in ways that is not possible in a conventional classroom environment. Nevertheless, for this unique capability of…

Abstract

E-learning has the potential to engage learners in ways that is not possible in a conventional classroom environment. Nevertheless, for this unique capability of e-learning to be optimised, a good understanding of learners’ need as to what motivate them to be engaged in activities is paramount. This chapter suggests strategies for engaging learners in e-learning based on past empirical studies on computer games characteristics and an exploratory study on values influencing learners’ decisions to engage in activities. The exploratory study in this chapter adopted qualitative research methods of Kelly Repertory grid and laddering interview based on the means-end chain (MEC) theory. Based on the exploratory study, value dimension was added to the existing literature. The value dimension of excitement, warm relationship with others and sense of accomplishment were revealed as important to learners in their decision whether to engage in activities. Strategies for e-learning instructions that promote the revealed values were suggested with the aim of integrating the value dimension with the existing literature as well as proven teaching approaches.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Immersive Interfaces: Virtual Worlds, Gaming, and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-241-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Robert W. Messler, Suat Genc and Gary A. Gabriele

Suggests that, without question, while every step in a systematic approach to the design of parts for assembly using integral snap‐fit features is important, none is more…

Abstract

Suggests that, without question, while every step in a systematic approach to the design of parts for assembly using integral snap‐fit features is important, none is more important than selecting locking features. After all, it is these features that hold the assembly together. While quite different in appearance and details of their operation, all integral locking features comprise a latch and a catch component to create a locking pair. Proper, no less optimum, function requires that such locking pairs be selected using a systematic approach. Presents that approach as a six‐step methodology, but first, defines and describes latch and catch components, bringing order to their apparent boundless variety. Demonstrates the utility of the methodology with a real‐life case study.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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