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Article

Zoha Rahman, Sedigheh Moghavvemmi, Kumaran Suberamanaian, Hasmah Zanuddin and Hairul Nizam Bin Md Nasir

The purpose of this paper is to identify the mediating effect of fan-page followers’ engagement activities and moderating role of followers’ demographic profile and trust…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the mediating effect of fan-page followers’ engagement activities and moderating role of followers’ demographic profile and trust level on their purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilised the customer engagement behaviour and consumer involvement theory as a foundation to explore the impact of variables. Structural equation modelling was utilised to test the model with the data collected from 307 Facebook fan pages’ followers of five Malaysian companies.

Findings

It was shown that following fan pages will influence fan page engagement, which in turn affects purchase intention and social media connectedness. Further analysis indicated that the impact of “follow” and “engagement” on purchase intention differs between genders, ages, level of trust and income.

Research limitations/implications

The study serves as a basic fundamental guideline for academics and researchers to interpret the concept of following fan pages and engagement actions and its effects on purchase intention and social media connectivity, as well as opening a vast area of unexplored researches on the subject of social media.

Practical implications

The research provides information for business-to-consumer companies in utilising fan page based on user categories.

Originality/value

This study proposes the application of an empirically tested framework to the fan-page follow actions. The authors argue that this framework can provide a useful foundation for future social commerce research. The results would help academics be aware of fan page and its user’s engagement actions, which will provide a new avenue of research.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article

Robert J. Harrington, Michael C. Ottenbacher, Laura Schmidt, Jessica C. Murray and Burkhard von Freyberg

Based on the Oktoberfest context and memory-dominant logic (MDL), the purpose of the study included assessing drivers of the perceptions of experience uniqueness; if these…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the Oktoberfest context and memory-dominant logic (MDL), the purpose of the study included assessing drivers of the perceptions of experience uniqueness; if these drivers and experience uniqueness perceptions transformed in memorable experiences; and if memorable experiences translated into enhanced life satisfaction. Based on these relationships, a typology and theory extension is provided integrating practical examples.

Design/methodology/approach

A five-factor model was tested using exploratory structural equation modeling and structural equation modeling; the factors included food and beverage quality; connectedness; experience uniqueness; meaningfulness and memorability; and life satisfaction.

Findings

Guests connectedness impacted life satisfaction perceptions. Positive perceptions of the experience uniqueness resulted in higher memorability. Food and beverage quality impacted both memorability and life satisfaction. Higher memorability resulted in higher life satisfaction. Attendee nationality impacted the relationship among several of the study’s factors.

Research limitations/implications

Progress was made on assessing the MDL concepts and translating them into quantitative values. Study results supported the impact of connectedness and product quality on perceptions of Oktoberfest experience uniqueness along with the impact of meaningfulness of the experience on life satisfaction perceptions. The authors acknowledged limitations because of one Oktoberfest beer tent focus and the weaknesses of survey methodology, limiting pre- and post-activity reporting and future investigation of moderating effects.

Practical implications

The consideration of higher order impacts (i.e. life satisfaction) is needed when delivering experiences and to entice loyalty and social media apostles. Consumers’ experience connectedness with high-quality perceptions and unique service design are likely to translate to memorable experiences, leading to life satisfaction perceptions. The concept of creating the experience “with” the customer appears to be a key aspect of memorability.

Originality/value

These results tested aspects of MDL and a typology emerged of ideal types as a modified MDL framework driven by two continua: transactional vs experiential quality and experiences designed “to” vs “with” customers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Julia A. Fehrer, Herbert Woratschek, Claas Christian Germelmann and Roderick J. Brodie

The purpose of this paper is to extend existing engagement research in two directions: first, it operationalizes the dynamic nature of the engagement process within a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend existing engagement research in two directions: first, it operationalizes the dynamic nature of the engagement process within a customer-brand dyad and, second, it tests the interrelationships with other network actors in a triadic network setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2×2 experimental design models the iterative nature of the engagement process based on repeated measures at three points in time, considering the contextual effects of connections with other customers and crowding-in effects based on monetary incentives.

Findings

This research demonstrates that in a utilitarian service setting, customer engagement does not emerge per se in the dyadic interaction between the customer and the brand. For high levels of engagement behavior to occur, incentives and ties to other network actors are essential. Further, the findings suggest a non-linear relationship between engagement behavior and its antecedents and consequences: engagement behavior must overcome a certain intensity threshold to unfold its effect.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to explore the dynamic nature of the engagement process in experiential and interactive service settings, and more complex network settings that may involve more actors and more complex relationships.

Practical implications

By facilitating connections between customers and compensating for low intrinsic interest, managers can facilitate actual engagement behavior even in utilitarian service contexts. Once engagement behavior has been triggered, an increased engagement disposition, higher satisfaction, higher involvement and higher loyalty follow.

Originality/value

This study empirically tests the dynamic nature of the engagement process within and beyond the dyad, and has revealed a non-linear pattern of customer engagement behavior within its nomological network.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Book part

Charmine E. J. Härtel and Jennifer M. O’Connor

Volunteerism underpins the sustainability of communities and a wide range of organizations. A review of the academic literature on volunteerism yields few studies…

Abstract

Volunteerism underpins the sustainability of communities and a wide range of organizations. A review of the academic literature on volunteerism yields few studies considering the role of emotions, but those that do exist clearly indicate that emotions are critical factors in the recruitment, retention, and wellbeing of volunteers. The contribution of this chapter is to provide a review of the existing published academic research on emotions in the context of volunteerism, and to put out a call for emotions research in this critical aspect of sustainable communities and organizations.

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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Article

Ali Abdallah Alalwan, Raed Salah Algharabat, Abdullah Mohammed Baabdullah, Nripendra P. Rana, Zainah Qasem and Yogesh K. Dwivedi

This study aims to examine the impact of mobile interactivity dimensions (active control, personalization, ubiquitous connectivity, connectedness, responsiveness and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of mobile interactivity dimensions (active control, personalization, ubiquitous connectivity, connectedness, responsiveness and synchronicity) on customer engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative field survey study was conducted to collect the required data from actual users of mobile shopping in three countries: Jordan, the United Kingdom (UK) and Saudi Arabia.

Findings

The results are based on structural equation modelling and support the impact of five dimensions of mobile interactivity: active control, personalization, ubiquitous connectivity, responsiveness and synchronicity. The impact of connectedness is not supported. The results also support the significant impact of customer engagement on customer loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This study only considered the shopping activities conducted by mobile channels, while other channels (e.g., online channels, traditional channels and social media shopping channels) are not considered. Furthermore, the current model does not consider the impact of personal factors (e.g., technology readiness, self-efficacy and user experience). The results of the current study present a foundation that can guide marketers and practitioners in the area of mobile shopping.

Originality/value

This study enriches the current understanding of the impact of mobile interactivity on mobile shopping, as well as how mobile interactivity can enhance the level of customer engagement.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article

Rania Hussein and Salah Hassan

The purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents of customer engagement on social media and how these platforms can enhance customers’ continuation intention. Customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents of customer engagement on social media and how these platforms can enhance customers’ continuation intention. Customer engagement is manifested by the continued use of social media and is expected to occur when customers have a positive attitude toward social media. Thus, the main objective of this research is to explore the factors that affect customers’ attitude toward social media, which in turn is expected to result in customer engagement. Attitude toward social media is proposed to have an impact on levels of use and satisfaction is proposed to have a direct impact on customer engagement. An extended technology acceptance model (TAM) is used as the basic model guiding this research.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical model is tested drawing on the results of empirical work in the form of a large scale survey conducted on a random sample of the US general population. Data collection resulted in 388 usable questionnaires. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze data.

Findings

Results of this research provide support to the research objectives. Two of the three proposed factors extending TAM, namely, perceived connectedness and enjoyment were found to have a significant effect on attitude toward social media use. Attitude toward social media use was found to have a significant effect on level of use and level of use was found to have a significant effect on continuation intention. Additionally, satisfaction was found to have a significant direct effect on continuation intention.

Practical implications

Findings of this research provide managers with useful insights about what they need to focus on when designing their social media strategies.

Originality/value

This study provides a different way of theorizing customer engagement by incorporating new variables to TAM that are particularly relevant to the social media context. It also draws a link between attitude toward social media and levels of use, which has been understudied in literature.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article

Breanna McGaffin, Frank P. Deane and Peter J. Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Keyes’ (2007) model of mental health, the presence (flourishing) or absence (languishing) of social, emotional and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Keyes’ (2007) model of mental health, the presence (flourishing) or absence (languishing) of social, emotional and psychological wellbeing, in the context of drug and alcohol misuse and the frequency and pattern of community participation (engaging in society).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 1,815 individuals (70 per cent male) who entered residential substance misuse treatment provided by The Salvation Army. Questionnaires were completed at intake assessments with The Salvation Army staff. The data were compared with population norms of community participation utilising t-tests, while multiple linear regression was used to examine continuous mental health.

Findings

Although participants have lower levels of community participation compared to Australian population norms, those participants who were experiencing flourishing mental health had higher rates of community participation than Australian norms. Keeping in touch with friends and family was the most common form of participation. Informal social connectedness and civic engagement were the strongest predictors of mental health over and above more traditional substance use outcomes such as cravings.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to describe the relationships between community participation, substance use and mental health in participants seeking treatment for substance misuse. Despite having a drug or alcohol addiction requiring treatment, those participants with flourishing mental health have higher levels of community participation than community norms. Furthermore, community participation predicts mental health. This offers promise for interventions that increase community participation but further research using longitudinal designs is needed to replicate and clarify the direction of these relationships.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article

Hari Kumar and Satish Raghavendran

Fostering employee engagement in large organizations is a formidable problem that gets even more challenging in a sluggish economy, when the standard lever of monetary…

Abstract

Purpose

Fostering employee engagement in large organizations is a formidable problem that gets even more challenging in a sluggish economy, when the standard lever of monetary incentives are not a viable option for boosting employee engagement and motivation. As the organization gets larger, building emotional connectedness or bonding becomes challenging as teams expand to operate in different time zones. The overwhelming pace of work in the modern workplace can also hamper bonding. Yet emotional connectedness, when present, serves as a catalyst in driving superior performance and employee loyalty. The culture of many large organizations discourages innovation and out-of-the-box thinking because their institutional structures encourage risk aversion. Even though large organizations are best positioned to absorb the ups and downs of intelligent risk-taking, their talent processes enforce conformity, legitimize mediocrity and penalize failed attempts at innovative thinking. Performance appraisals tend to promote employees who take the path of least resistance. Managers, of course, help perpetuate this risk-averse cycle of mediocrity. Either they have been conditioned to think only in a linear fashion or organizational systems perpetuate managerial insecurity at all levels. This insecurity manifests in several ways: managers may take credit for the work performed by a subordinate; shoot down ideas a subordinate may have; or deflect opportunities that a subordinate may get. Survival in such an environment is based on being average and staying within the system. As a result, the spirit of entrepreneurship is lost. The authors designed a creative and playful contest called “Maverick” to tackle employee engagement in large organizations. The contest deeper goals include: shifting culture and behavior, talent discovery, brand building and meaningful engagement. The impact of the program on a broader organizational culture parameters were assessed through a survey. The survey results validate the impact of the program.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a conceptual approach that underlies the design of the Maverick program. Surveys were deployed to determine the perceived impact of the program on the broader culture.

Findings

The secret ingredient in employee engagement is gaining the “emotional share of wallet” of employees to drive meaningful, enduring organizational change. Emotional wallet share is the sweet spot that lies at the intersection of employees’ skill sets, their aspirations and the value they generate for the organization. Proactively identifying the sweet spot empowers an organization to capture employees’ emotional wallet share to identify enablers and catalysts that can unlock motivation and performance. The survey results indicate that the Maverick contest was perceived to have a positive impact on all the identified attributes. This is a testament to the program’s success as a pivotal driver of a positive organizational culture. Further, it validates that the Maverick contest identifies several levers that leaders can use to positively influence organizational culture.

Research limitations/implications

The organizations can adapt the proposed conceptual framework in designing meaningful programs to tackle employee engagement and motivation.

Practical implications

The paper provides a meaningful framework to tackle employee engagement in large organizations. The Maverick approach is of interest to leaders of large organizations that are struggling to increase employee engagement with limited resources and that wish to foster creativity to drive innovation. The program offers a compelling way for talented professionals to meaningfully contribute to their organization that is agnostic to their position in the hierarchy. It gives employees the freedom to strive without being paralyzed by fear of failure; the chance to build their personal brand and pride; and a safe environment in which they can question received wisdom and attempt an unconventional approach to problem-solving. It creates a playful environment to bust stress, foster innovation and encourage an entrepreneurial mindset.

Originality/value

This paper offers a superior alternative to the standard gamification solutions that are routinely applied to business situations. Gamification mechanics work effectively in roles that are transactional, instead of roles that demand autonomy, mastery and a sense of purpose. Maverick program is designed while being mindful of the intrinsic motivation of the professionals.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

Fiona Rowe and Donald Stewart

School connectedness, or a sense of belonging to the school environment, is an established protective factor for child and adolescent health, education, and social…

Abstract

Purpose

School connectedness, or a sense of belonging to the school environment, is an established protective factor for child and adolescent health, education, and social well‐being. While a comprehensive, whole‐school approach that addresses the school organisational environment is increasingly endorsed as an effective approach to promote connectedness, how this approach creates a sense of belonging in the school environment requires systematic in‐depth exploration. This paper aims to address these issues

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the influence on school connectedness of a whole‐school approach to promote health in school, using a qualitative case study method. Three school communities in Southeast Queensland, Australia, are investigated as case studies in order to formulate a theoretical model of how health promotion approaches can build school connectedness.

Findings

This study finds that a health promotion approach builds school connectedness by encouraging a “whole‐school” orientation designed to foster interaction among members of the entire school community. Specific activities that promote interaction are school‐wide activities involving the entire school community and, at the classroom level, “whole‐class” activities in which students and staff work together on activities that create links between the two groups, such as collaborative curriculum planning. The “whole‐school” emphasis on partnerships between staff and students and parents is also important, particularly with its focus on initiating and sustaining school‐community partnerships.

Originality/value

The findings are important, since they validate a whole‐school approach to building school connectedness and address an important gap in the literature about how to promote school connectedness and thereby protect the well‐being of children and adolescents.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Danita van Heerden and Melanie Wiese

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers’ motivations for engaging in Facebook brand communities, and what outcomes brands can gain from online engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumers’ motivations for engaging in Facebook brand communities, and what outcomes brands can gain from online engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

An online consumer panel was used to collect data through convenience sampling; 497 useable questionnaires were collected.

Findings

The results of the structural equation modelling show that hedonic motivations are more prevalent in Facebook brand communities than utilitarian motivations. When considering the outcomes of online engagement, loyalty towards the brand community is the strongest outcome, followed by word-of-mouth and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This research indicates that marketers should focus on creating content on Facebook brand communities that appeals to the hedonic needs of consumers, such as brand likeability, entertainment and interpersonal utility. This type of content will motivate members of these brand communities to engage online. When consumers engage online, it creates benefits for the brand such as loyalty, word-of-mouth and purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study presents a framework for investigating consumers’ motivation to engage online, based on a theoretical underpinning of both sense of community theory and uses and gratification theory. It also identifies three outcomes for brands that explain why it is worthwhile for firms to invest in engaging with consumers in Facebook brand communities while including a wide range of brand communities.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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