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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Amna Akhound, Aseem Majeed Rizvi, Waqar Ahmed and Muhammad Nadeem Khan

Energy-saving behavior of individuals is essential to minimize energy use and reduce the emission of toxic gases. This study's actual focus is to find out the determinants…

Abstract

Purpose

Energy-saving behavior of individuals is essential to minimize energy use and reduce the emission of toxic gases. This study's actual focus is to find out the determinants of the energy-saving behavior of individuals in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

As a theoretical research model, the extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been used to analyze the determinants of energy-saving intentions. A survey method is used to collect 289 valid data, and structural equation modeling (SEM) is used to analyze the data.

Findings

The final result shows that the variables attitude at home, subjective norm (SN) and descriptive norms positively impact intention to save energy at the workplace. In contrast, the construct attitude and perceived behavior control is insignificant in this research. On the other hand, the personal moral norm (PMN) is a powerful predictor of individual energy-saving intentions at the workplace.

Originality/value

This research provides insights that will help the organizations understand the behavior of individuals at the workplace for energy-saving intentions to formulate such policies that will enhance individuals' practice for energy savings.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Jayaraman Chillayil, Suresh M., Viswanathan P.K., Sushanta Kumar Mahapatra and Sasi K. Kottayil

In the realm of energy behaviour studies, very little research has been done to understand industrial energy behaviour (IEB) that influences the willingness to adopt (WTA…

Abstract

Purpose

In the realm of energy behaviour studies, very little research has been done to understand industrial energy behaviour (IEB) that influences the willingness to adopt (WTA) energy-efficient measures. Most of the studies on energy behaviour were focused on the residential and commercial sectors where the behaviour under investigation was under volitional control, that is, where people believe that they can execute the behaviour whenever they are willing to do so. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing the industry’s intentions and behaviour that leads to enhanced adoption of energy efficiency measures recommended through energy audits. In particular, this paper aims to extend the existing behaviour intention models using the total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) method and expert feedback to develop an IEB model

Design/methodology/approach

TISM technique was used to determine the relationship between different elements of the behaviour. Responses were collected from experts in the field of energy efficiency to understand the relationship between identified factors, their driving power and dependency.

Findings

The results show that values, socialisation and leadership of individuals are the key driving factors in deciding the individual energy behaviour. WTA energy-saving measures recommended by an energy auditor are found to be highly dependent on the organisational policies such as energy policy, delegation of power to energy manager and life cycle cost evaluation in purchase policy.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a few limitations that warrant consideration in future research. First, the data came from a small sample of energy experts based on a convenience sample of Indian experts. This limits the generalizability of the results. Individual and organizational behaviour analysed in this study looked into a few select characteristics, derived from the literature review and expert feedback, which may pose questions about the standard for behaviours in different industries.

Practical implications

Reasons for non-adoption of energy audit recommendations are rarely shared by the industries and the analysis of individual and organisational behaviour through structured questionnaire and surveys have serious limitations. Under this circumstance, collecting expert feedback and using the TISM method to build an IEB model can help to build strategies to enhance the adoption of energy-efficient measures.

Social implications

Various policy level interventions and regulatory measures in the energy field, adopted across the globe, are found unsuccessful in narrowing the energy-efficiency gap, reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global warming. Understanding the key driving factors can help develop effective intervention strategies to improve energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions.

Originality/value

The industry energy behaviour model with driving, linking and dependent factors and factor hierarchy is a novel contribution to the theory of organisational behaviour. The model takes into consideration both the individual and organisational factors where the decision-making is not strictly under volitional control. Understanding the key driving factor of behaviour can help design an effective intervention strategy that addresses the barriers to energy efficiency improvement. The results imply that it is important to carry out post energy audit studies to understand the implementation rate of recommendations and also the individual and organisational factors that influence the WTA energy-saving measures.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Michael Sony and Nandakumar Mekoth

There is an unresolved paradox concerning electricity energy-saving behaviour. On one hand, there are many studies on energy-saving behaviours and on the other hand…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an unresolved paradox concerning electricity energy-saving behaviour. On one hand, there are many studies on energy-saving behaviours and on the other hand, recent research stresses that there exists large amount untapped potential in terms electricity energy-saving behaviours. Therefore, it becomes pertinent to revisit the construct of electricity energy-saving behaviours qualitatively to enlarge the spectrum of understanding. The purpose of this paper is to answer the research question why do not customers care about electricity energy-saving behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study is undertaken in Western India using grounded theory methodology. The basic steps in the analysis of qualitative data consist of coding the data, combining the codes into broader categories and themes, and interpreting the results.

Findings

The study identifies seven categories of determinants of electricity energy-saving behaviours. Policy implications and limitations of the study are discussed along with areas of future research directions.

Originality/value

This is the first study to unearth the dimensions of electricity energy-saving behaviour.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Mohd Hafizal Ishak

In working towards a sustainable campus of public universities, energy consumption behaviour assessment is one of the several issues that requires attention by the…

Abstract

Purpose

In working towards a sustainable campus of public universities, energy consumption behaviour assessment is one of the several issues that requires attention by the facilities manager. Information on energy consumption behaviour is needed to determine potential energy savings. The purpose of this study is to assess energy consumption behaviour for student accommodations in Malaysian public universities.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focuses on developing energy consumption behaviour models (ECBMs) and assesses the potential energy savings. The “energy culture” framework consolidated with multiple regression analysis is used to strengthen the development of ECBMs. A self-administrated survey involving 1,009 respondents in selected public universities was carried out.

Findings

The result shows that five factors from the energy culture framework contribute to energy consumption behaviour, namely, building regulation, environmental concern, education, social marketing and direct factors (device and activities). These factors are included in the model for predicting energy consumption levels. The results show that there is a 78 per cent difference in energy consumption between the observed and predicted data.

Practical implications

This study indicates a high potential energy saving among students of Malaysian public universities.

Originality/value

The model was tested against the overall students among Malaysian public universities. In future, the model can be tested within hostel accommodations. The present assessment revealed the potential energy saving among the hostel buildings and sets the target regarding which building has a potential to reduce energy. It also helps the facilities managers to come up with strategies for programmes and energy policy in public universities.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2018

Angel Ancha Lindelwa Bulunga and Gladman Thondhlana

In response to increasing energy demand and financial constraints to invest in green infrastructure, behaviour change energy-saving interventions are increasingly being…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to increasing energy demand and financial constraints to invest in green infrastructure, behaviour change energy-saving interventions are increasingly being considered as a tool for encouraging pro-environmental behaviour in campus residences. This paper aims to report on a pilot programme aimed at reducing energy consumption via behaviour change interventions, variably applied in residences at Rhodes University, South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via structured questionnaires, energy consumption records and post-intervention programme focus group discussions.

Findings

Participant residences that received a mix of different interventions in the forms of pamphlets, face-to-face discussions, incentives and feedback recorded more energy reductions of up to 9 per cent than residences that received a single or no intervention. In post-experiment discussions, students cited personal, institutional and structural barriers to pro-environmental energy-use behaviour.

Practical implications

Overall, the results of this study suggest that information provision of energy-saving tips combined with regular feedback and incentives can result in energy-use reductions in university residences, which may yield environmental and economic benefits for universities, but addressing barriers to pro-environmental behaviour might maximise the results.

Originality/value

Given the lack of literature on energy conservation in the global South universities, this study provides the basis for discussing the potential for using behavioural interventions in universities for stirring pathways towards sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Nurul Sakina Mokhtar Azizi, Suzanne Wilkinson and Elizabeth Fassman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of energy saving behaviour between green and conventional office buildings in Malaysia to determine if people in…

2945

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of energy saving behaviour between green and conventional office buildings in Malaysia to determine if people in green buildings perform better energy saving behaviour than people in conventional buildings. The paper specifically focused on use of technology, computer usage and potential energy savings from that use. The paper then examines what strategies are used to encourage energy saving behaviour for building occupants.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed to occupants in the buildings to evaluate the extent of energy saving behaviour practiced, and identify potential strategies to encourage energy saving behaviour.

Findings

The findings show better energy saving behaviour practice in green buildings and the paper show why this is the case. The recommended strategies to encourage energy saving behaviour are discussed, and include means of raising education awareness on energy efficiency among the occupants. This can be done through distribution of guidelines, posters, pamphlets and e-mails. Occupants can also be given live updates on the energy usage of the building. Briefing on the objectives and goals of the organisation’s commitment to energy efficiency can be given to newly employed staff. As seen in this paper, these multiple strategies have shown to be successful in encouraging energy saving behaviours.

Originality/value

To date, energy saving behaviour has been given less focus in improving green building performance. There is limited research that compares energy saving behaviour between green and conventional commercial buildings in Malaysia. The findings provide a better understanding on occupants’ behaviour in energy conservation and suggest strategies for future recommendation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Martin Böckle, Jasminko Novak and Markus Bick

The purpose of this paper is to explore user-centered design possibilities at the intersection of gamification and persuasive technology to foster energy saving behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore user-centered design possibilities at the intersection of gamification and persuasive technology to foster energy saving behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

We performed a large-scale empirical study of 480 participants and analyzed how different HEXAD gamification user types perceive selected persuasive strategies embedded in an energy saving prototype. Furthermore, we investigated the role of existing energy saving behaviors (pro-environmental behavior scale–e.g. regularly turning the lights off) and their effect on the perceived persuasiveness of the proposed persuasive strategies, which may has an impact on the overall design process. Furthermore, we applied partial least squares path modeling and conducted a one-way and repeated measure ANOVA.

Findings

Results show that user types play an important role in the design of persuasive systems for energy saving. For instance, people with a high tendency toward the Socializer user type were motivated by almost all of the employed persuasive strategies, whereas Philanthropists and Players only to a limited number of strategies. Furthermore, our study reveals that existing behaviors like the individual level of energy conservation influences the perceived persuasiveness of certain strategies and therefore should be considered in the design of such applications.

Research limitations/implications

Using storyboards to obtain feedback about the perceived persuasiveness of employed strategies has limitations compared to the actual use of a functional prototype. However, to offset that limitation the mock-ups used in the storyboard reflected the actual designs for a real-world prototype.

Originality

This is the first study that explores how HEXAD gamification user types can be used to inform the design of persuasive applications for energy saving (RQ1). Furthermore, and in particular, this study draws on the challenges when using user types within gamified persuasive systems by highlighting the impact and the importance of considering existing energy saving behaviors (RQ2), which has not been addressed so far.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Marla B. Royne, Jeff Thieme and Marian Levy

The purpose of this paper is to identify how five factors (environmental involvement, environmental concern, financial motivations, social motivations and energy concern…

1037

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how five factors (environmental involvement, environmental concern, financial motivations, social motivations and energy concern motivations) motivate individuals to engage in pro-environmental behaviors (curtailment, capital investment behaviors and food-related behaviors).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey approach is used to collect data, and regression analysis is used to answer the research question.

Findings

Results show that social motivations are positively associated with all three behaviors such as environmental involvement, Environmental Concern and Energy Concern Motivations are positively associated with some behaviors; and Financial Motivations are not associated with any behaviors examined in this study.

Research limitations/implications

These results highlight the widespread impact of social motivations, the more specific impact of environmental involvement, environmental concern and energy concern motivations, and the lack of impact of financial motivations on these three distinct pro-environmental behaviors.

Practical implications

Given that social motivation is so strong and pervasive across all three categories of pro-environmental behaviors, leadership in encouraging a dialogue/debate around these issues is needed from all stakeholders, including government, industry leaders, think tanks and environmental organizations.

Originality/value

This study incorporates multiple factors that have differing impact on three distinct pro-environmental behaviors.

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Summer Allen and Sandra T. Marquart-Pyatt

This research contributes to the literature on workplace energy conservation by examining the predictors of individual employee behaviors and policy support in a…

Abstract

Purpose

This research contributes to the literature on workplace energy conservation by examining the predictors of individual employee behaviors and policy support in a university. The purpose of this research is to better understand what factors influence energy conservation behaviors in this setting to inform programs and interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

This project gathered survey data from employee-occupants of three campus buildings. Ordinary least squares regression analyses were used to investigate the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and attitudes-behavior-constraints (ABC) models examining what drives energy behaviors.

Findings

This study finds a large proportion of respondents would support energy use reduction policies, more technology-based interventions and increased use of renewable sources. Respondents report positive attitudes toward individual energy conservation behavior but mild agreement with the influence of social norms. Self-efficacy reports also are positive. Although the TPB model is not fully supported in this group, the ABC model appears to perform well.

Originality/value

In addition to adding to the relatively limited data on employee energy-saving behaviors in the university workplace, this study provides initial evidence that the ABC model is pertinent to this behavioral context. It also provides specific, usable data about policies and actions that campus community members might deem feasible and acceptable to relevant university offices.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Katherine Butler, Ross Gordon, Kate Roggeveen, Gordon Waitt and Paul Cooper

Drawing on value theory, this study aims to explore the perceived value of using energy efficiently amongst a low-income older population group. It aims to provide an…

1927

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on value theory, this study aims to explore the perceived value of using energy efficiently amongst a low-income older population group. It aims to provide an empirical exploration of the concept of value-in-behaviour, and, in doing so, identify that it is a logical addition to the extant concepts of value-in-exchange and value-in-use.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory focus group research was conducted to explore older, low-income people’s perceived value towards using energy efficiently in the contexts of their everyday lives. The research was conducted in regional New South Wales, Australia, with 11 focus groups of 59 people (40 females, 19 males) aged over 60 with a personal disposable income below $26,104 per annum.

Findings

Using this framework, functional, economic and ecological value appeared to be the most pertinent value dimensions for using energy efficiently, while social or emotional value was less relevant. Attention is drawn to how value in using energy efficiently emerges within the everyday contingencies and constraints configured by individual households’ financial, social, material and cultural contexts. These findings suggest that programmes in this area and with similar target groups would benefit from trying to promote and co-create such value.

Originality/value

The present study provides empirical evidence that consumers in a social marketing context appear to perceive value-in-behaviour in relation to using energy efficiently. This approach inspires social marketers to foster individual behaviour change through a better understanding of how value is created in everyday practices. This builds upon existing work on value in social marketing and suggests that value is an important concept that warrants continued theoretical, empirical and practical exploration.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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