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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Dramani Bukari, Francis Xavier Dery Tuokuu, Shafic Suleman, Ishmael Ackah and Godwin Apenu

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the programmes being implemented with a view to ascertaining if they adequately address the energy needs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the programmes being implemented with a view to ascertaining if they adequately address the energy needs of the poor more holistically and sustainably.

Design/methodology/approach

The content of this desktop review is based on information collected through a review of available energy policy documents from the Ghana Government and related governmental agencies, such as the Energy Commission and Ghana Statistical Services, international energy-related agencies, such as the International Energy Agency (World Vision, 2013), as well as other related web searches. Additionally, global and Sub-Saharan African energy access documents were reviewed by analysing secondary data from the World Bank and UN policy reports, statistical data, strategies, regulations, protocols and other related documents (World Vision, 2013). Furthermore, some policy documents on energy access and usage were explored mainly from Senegal and Ghana to ascertain governments’ policies, regulations and strategies in the implementation of energy access policies.

Findings

The paper offers all the various strategies being implemented in an attempt to establish a foothold on the problem of affording the poor with clean and affordable energies. The paper also presents the rich experiences of Senegal in its bid to see expanded access in liquefied petroleum gas usage by residential consumers.

Originality/value

The paper provides some policy and theoretical implications for improving Ghana’s energy access.

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Ebenezer Bugri Anarfo, Abel Mawuko Agoba, Yakubu Awudu Sare and Daniel Komla Gameti

This study aims to investigate the impact of energy access on foreign direct investment (FDI) in an emerging market.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of energy access on foreign direct investment (FDI) in an emerging market.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the two-stage least square instrumental variables estimation approach to compute the parameters of the model to account for any potential endogeneity and time persistence in energy access.

Findings

The results show that energy access significantly influences FDI inflows in Ghana. The results of the study also revealed that natural resources and macroeconomic variables such as real interest rate, gross domestic product growth rate are significant determinants of FDI inflows in Ghana.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this study is that there is a need for energy sector policy reforms in Ghana that would guarantee a secured and continued supply of energy to enhance energy access to boost FDI. Ghana should aim for a cost-effective, stable and environmentally friendly source of energy as an alternative to hydro energy as the main source of its power generation to promote FDI. Also, Ghana should initiate and implement policies aimed at creating an enabling and stable macroeconomic environment, as macroeconomic factors in this study are found to be drivers of FDI.

Originality/value

This study provides firsthand information on energy access and FDI from the Ghanaian perspective.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Minh Ha-Duong and Hoai-Son Nguyen

The authors estimate the reduction of electricity poverty in Vietnam. The essential argument is that human development is about subjective feeling as much as technology and income.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors estimate the reduction of electricity poverty in Vietnam. The essential argument is that human development is about subjective feeling as much as technology and income.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a self-reported satisfaction indicator as complementary to objective indicators based on national household surveys from 2008 to 2018.

Findings

In 2010, the fraction of households with access to electricity was over 96%. However, over 24% declared their electricity use did not meet their needs. Since 2014, the satisfaction rate is around 97%, even if 25% of the households used less than 50 kWh/month. Today there is electricity for all in Vietnam, but electricity bills weigh more and more in the budget of households.

Practical implications

The subjective energy poverty measure allows better international statistics: unlike poverty or needs-based criteria, self-assessed satisfaction of needs compares across income levels and climates.

Social implications

Inequalities in electricity use among Vietnamese households decreased during the 2008–2018 period, but are not greater than inequalities in income, contrary to the findings of Son and Yoon (2020).

Originality/value

Engineering and econometric objectivist approaches dominate the literature on sustainability monitoring. Out of 232 sustainable development goal (SDG) indicators, only two are subjective. Yet the findings show that subjective indicators tell a different part of the story. Access is not grid building, but the meaningful provision of electricity to satisfy the needs.

Details

Fulbright Review of Economics and Policy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2635-0173

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2017

Shaheen Akter, Xiaolan Fu, Leonardo Bremermann, Mauro Rosa, Valerie Nattrodt, Juha Väätänen, Roman Teplov and Iulduz Khairullina

Access to affordable and sustainable energy is crucial for the improvement of the well-being of modern societies. Most energy technologies require comparatively high…

Abstract

Access to affordable and sustainable energy is crucial for the improvement of the well-being of modern societies. Most energy technologies require comparatively high up-front investment, which adds to the challenge of electrification, despite the recognized multiple benefits. Partnership with multinational enterprises (MNEs) can provide necessary investment in infrastructure, finance, and technology for renewable energy and contribute to improving development indicators. However, remote areas with poor infrastructure do not have access to MNEs that are profit seekers. The Brazil experience with MNEs and “Light for All” (LfA) program shows that people gaining access to electricity invest more in businesses, education, health, and women reduce their drudgery at household chores. However, areas having a poor infrastructure in the north remain out of electricity, and attempts to create universal access were failed until a regulatory incentive framework and particular attention from the government was established. This is a great learning for the developing countries aiming to achieve sustainable development goals. A host country can gain development cooperation from MNEs with rightly formulated and implemented policies and regulatory conditions.

Details

Multinational Enterprises and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-163-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Alhassan A. Karakara, Evans S. Osabuohien and Simplice Asongu

This paper aims to analyse the extent to which households are deprived (or otherwise) of clean energy sources in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the extent to which households are deprived (or otherwise) of clean energy sources in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

It engages the Ghana Demographic and Health Survey data. Three different energy deprivation indicators were estimated: cooking fuel deprivation, lighting deprivation and indoor air pollution. The empirical evidence is based on logit regressions that explain whether households are deprived or not.

Findings

The results show that energy deprivation or access is contingent on the area of residence. Energy access and deprivation in Ghana show some regional disparities, even though across every region, the majority of households use three fuel types: liquefied petroleum gas, charcoal and wood cut. Increases in wealth and education lead to reduction in the likelihood of being energy deprived. Thus, efforts should be geared towards policies that will ensure households having access to clean fuels to reduce the attendant deprivations and corresponding effects of using dangerous or dirty fuels.

Originality/value

This study complements the extant literature by analysing the extent to which households are deprived (or otherwise) of clean energy sources in Ghana.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Abstract

Details

SDG7 – Ensure Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable and Modern Energy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-802-5

Abstract

Details

SDG7 – Ensure Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable and Modern Energy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-802-5

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Abstract

Details

Energy Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-780-1

Abstract

Details

SDG7 – Ensure Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable and Modern Energy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-802-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, David Mensah Sackey, Dickson Osei-Asibey, Rachelle Kyerewah Agyapong and David John Edwards

The purpose of the study is to investigate the challenges in improving women's energy access, rights and equitable sustainable development from a Ghanaian perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the challenges in improving women's energy access, rights and equitable sustainable development from a Ghanaian perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The research utilizes a mixed method. A qualitative in-depth exploratory design was chosen to understand how gender is mainstreamed within Ghana's energy sector. This included semi-structured interviews with key managers, experience policy experts and focus groups. The semi-structured interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis (TCA).

Findings

The study reveals that the National Energy Policy of 2010, as the main energy policy regulating the energy sector in Ghana, does make provision for gender equality, safety especially women, in line with Ghana's sustainable development goals. The energy policy aims to empower women and create gender parity in the sector. Nevertheless, the study also found major challenges to gender mainstreaming in the energy sector, including poor analysis in formulating energy policies, inadequate financial resources, and poor monitoring and evaluation.

Originality/value

The paper exposes gender equity challenges associated with the energy sector in Ghana. It also offers a new policy angle which connects gender mainstreaming to sustainable development. The research describes how women are included in developing energy policies and in addressing gender challenges in the energy sector.

Details

Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

Keywords

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