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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Seppo Junnila

The purpose of the study is to estimate the potential of end‐user effect on energy conservation in office buildings. The study quantifies the energy conservation potential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to estimate the potential of end‐user effect on energy conservation in office buildings. The study quantifies the energy conservation potential and estimates the current level of energy management in four banking organisations in the Nordic countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The multiple case study employs quantitative scenario analysis for estimating the energy conservation potential of office equipment and lighting, and uses a qualitative model for estimating the current level of end‐user energy management in the organisations.

Findings

The study found that noticeable potential for energy conservation exists in the end‐user energy consumption. The tested scenarios significantly decreased the yearly electricity consumption of office equipment, for some 70 per cent, from 21 kWh per m2 to 6 kWh per m2. The electricity consumption of lighting was also noticeably improved, for some 30 per cent, from 38 kWh per m2 to 27 kWh per m2, equalling a 29 per cent reduction there. Altogether, the identified savings equal an improvement of roughly 20 per cent in the overall electricity consumption of the organisations. At the same time, the evaluation of current energy management showed that the management practices implemented represent only a rather modest level of end‐user energy management.

Research limitations/implications

The multiple case study focused on four Nordic countries and banking organisations only. As the banking sector tends to be more conservative than some other industries, the results are not necessary valid in all industries. The simulation tools used, especially for lighting, only give estimation of the “best case” type of situation for tested scenarios, in which it is assumed that all end‐users would start to behave according to the scenario.

Practical implications

This study implies clearly that end‐user‐energymanagement services are needed in FM. Although the user behaviour is more challenging to manage than pure technology, it can be quite profitable. For example, in the studied organisations, the savings found in end‐user energy would equal yearly profits of roughly 1.7 million €, i.e. some 20 per cent of the overall electricity budgets of the companies.

Originality/value

Most of the quantitative energy conservation studies in the offices have concentrated so far on new constructions and building system improvements. This study quantifies the potential influence of good facilities management with the end‐user activation on the energy efficiency of office buildings.

Details

Facilities, vol. 25 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Eeva Määttänen, Riikka Kyrö, Anna Aaltonen, Anna-Liisa Sarasoja and Seppo Junnila

The study aims to investigate the effects of a remote energy management service to the energy consumption of retail buildings. The study focuses on analysing the changes…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to investigate the effects of a remote energy management service to the energy consumption of retail buildings. The study focuses on analysing the changes in energy consumption after the implementation of a facility service concept where building processes are optimized with a remote energy management system. The paper seeks to demonstrate that remotely operated building management practices, which allow high competence service for all facilities, have a positive impact, beyond traditional facility services, on energy and environmental performance of buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research analyses the metered energy consumption of two retail building portfolios comprising altogether 44 properties. Additionally, secondary data are collected from archive reviews, observation and interviews.

Findings

The research shows that remote energy management service reduced the total energy consumption during the two-year service period by 12 and 6 per cent depending on the portfolio. Electricity consumption was found to decrease by 7 per cent and heating energy by 26 per cent on the average in the first portfolio, and 7 and 4 per cent in the second one, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Variation between buildings was found to be relatively high as the individual characteristics and history of the different buildings inevitably affect the achieved results.

Practical implications

The study indicates that remote energy management offers an effective means to reduce the energy consumption and costs, and ultimately climate impacts derived from buildings.

Originality/value

The study adds to the knowledge of facilities management in context to energy management and environmental performance of buildings.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2018

Jan Niklas Rotzek, Christoph Scope and Edeltraud Günther

This investigation aims to reframe the sizeable literature on barriers and drivers for energy efficiency measures (EEMs) and the phenomenon of the energy efficiency gap…

Abstract

Purpose

This investigation aims to reframe the sizeable literature on barriers and drivers for energy efficiency measures (EEMs) and the phenomenon of the energy efficiency gap. The authors identify a gap between academic methods and industrial needs, as well as a neglect of the cultural dimension, despite its considerable impact. On the basis of this insight, the purpose of this paper is to integrate all of the various influences on industrial energy behavior previously identified in the literature in a refined energy cultures framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes a systematic literature review of research in the field of energy management, energy efficiency and cultural aspects within barriers and drivers of energy behavior. The authors select and refine an existing energy cultures framework for the industrial context. To meet industrial needs, the authors applied an ontology mapping of its core elements onto an international standard common for industrial energy management practice.

Findings

First, the authors present a refined framework for industrial energy cultures incorporating past barriers and drivers as factors. The framework enables an evaluation of attitude and behavioral aspects, underlying technologies, organizational culture and actions related to energy as a system of interdependencies. Second, the factors are ranked on the basis of the number of appearances and empirical metadata. Economic aspects such as “purchase, installment and hidden costs”, “general investment and risk behavior” and “regulatory conditions” are the highest ranked factors, but “existing knowledge about EEM”, “hierarchy approach: top down” and “environmental concerns” follow closely and represent cultural aspects, which are still underrated. Third, while illustrating a successful mapping onto a standardized process of continuous improvement, the authors also argue for heightened academia–practice efforts.

Practical implications

Reframing the energy efficiency gap as a problem of what aspirations play a role, what technology is chosen and how technologies are used should increase the level of implementation of EEMs in the real business world. Introducing the refined energy cultures framework serves as a starting point for future transdisciplinary collaboration between academia and practice.

Social implications

Targeting the energy efficiency gap is an essential part of the sustainable development goals. The refined energy cultures framework allows for a better understanding of the industrial energy behaviors that are responsible for a significant share of a company’s success. The introduction of energy cultures serves as a starting point for future scholarly research within sustainability management accounting.

Originality/value

The investigation combines existing research streams, their concepts and their results about cultural aspects related to energy efficiency for both academics and practitioners. This review is the first to capture all of the various factors analyzed in academic literature using the energy cultures framework as a basis. The authors add to the theoretical development of that framework with its application to the industrial context. This is identified as a gap. Its refinement helps to holistically understand barriers and drivers of industrial EEMs to support its practical implementation.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Adnan Enshassi, Abed Ayash and Sherif Mohamed

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors driving Palestinian construction contractors to implement energy management strategies during the execution of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors driving Palestinian construction contractors to implement energy management strategies during the execution of construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted by administering a questionnaire that comprised 26 drivers for adopting energy management strategies. Data were collected from 67 contractors in the Gaza Strip. Factor analysis was adopted to explore the underlying relationships among the identified drivers.

Findings

Drivers were grouped into one of the four categories: economic and financial, institutional and legal, organisational and managerial and educational and informational. The results revealed that the majority of the respondents were of the view that economic and financial factors were the most important factors driving the adoption of energy management strategies by construction companies in the Gaza Strip. Of the economic and financial drivers, the cost savings derived from the adoption of energy management strategies was considered the most important item. Energy management education and training programmes are scarce in the Gaza Strip, and local contractors have no formal energy management education and training. The government needs to allocate sufficient funds for policy implementation and regulation enforcement.

Research limitations/implications

Difficulties in accessing energy management data are deemed as a limitation to this study, as the topic of energy management in the construction has received no or very little academic attention so far.

Practical implications

This study provides a valuable reference for studying ongoing research in the practice of energy management development in other industries and locations. The priority of the drivers for energy management will help the local contracting companies to focus on weak and strong points of the company for energy use development to remove these weak points and invest in strong points. This paper results can increase the encouragement for greater social responsibility of the contracting organisations towards energy use. Government and concerned organisations can get benefits from the identified factors in encouraging contractors to adopt energy management strategy in their projects.

Originality/value

This study is the first investigation of energy management aspects in a local construction industry, especially from contracting organisations.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Boya Ji, Yuming Liu and Zhanyong Jin

The purpose of this paper is to utilise a “Wuli-Shili-Renli (WSR)” system approach to create models for complex smart building energy management and evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilise a “Wuli-Shili-Renli (WSR)” system approach to create models for complex smart building energy management and evaluate the establishment of a building energy management platform.

Design/methodology/approach

The complexity and diversity of the data and demands of the energy management platform mean that it is necessary to analyse comprehensively. This paper uses a WSR system approach to handle, and optimise, the relationship between demands and participants and improve the whole platform. Then, this paper establishes comprehensive evaluation models to analysis the current energy management platforms by using the best integration platform as the baseline.

Findings

The WSR conceptual model clarifies the relationship between the elements and elements of the energy management platform clearly and provides the appropriate analytical methods with which to resolve key platform construction issues. The comprehensive evaluation based on a WSR system approach can take into account the systematic effect, so it is more accurate.

Research limitations/implications

The correlation degree between the layers of the energy management platform is rarely reflected.

Originality/value

This paper improves the modelling method used in the WSR system approach and demonstrates that the comprehensive evaluation based on the WSR system approach analyses the energy management platform for public buildings in a synthetic approach.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Naghmeh Khabazi Kenari, Naser Feghhi Farahmand and Soleyman Iranzadeh

Iran is currently among the countries with high energy consumption levels. Based on the statistics published on the country's hydrocarbon balance sheet, the industrial…

Abstract

Purpose

Iran is currently among the countries with high energy consumption levels. Based on the statistics published on the country's hydrocarbon balance sheet, the industrial sector was the largest energy user of all the sectors, followed by the household and transportation sectors. Besides, production lines account for the highest percentage of the industrial sector energy consumption. Accordingly, this paper aims to investigate the effects of coordinated energy management and manufacturing strategies to increase energy management performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper collected the required information on energy management and manufacturing from the experts of petrochemical companies; and oil and gas refineries and then examined their relationship. Moreover, the questionnaire tool was used to measure the independent variable.

Findings

The evaluations showed that organizations with coordinated and uncoordinated strategies do not exhibit equal energy management performance. Organizations with a coordinated combination of strategies have higher energy management performance than those with an uncoordinated combination of strategies. Combinations such as 11, 22, 33 and 44 are among the more coordinated combinations, which lead to higher performance.

Originality/value

Reviewing the studies in this regard revealed that limited and a handful of research papers were carried out on organizations' energy management strategies. None of the existing research has considered energy management strategies as a subsystem of an organization or specified its coordination with manufacturing strategies. However, this research has delved into this issue and our findings confirm certain assumptions of past studies and contribute to evaluating its effects on energy management performance.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Sushil

A systems perspective of waste management allows an integratedapproach not only to the five basic functional elements of wastemanagement itself (generation, reduction…

Abstract

A systems perspective of waste management allows an integrated approach not only to the five basic functional elements of waste management itself (generation, reduction, collection, recycling, disposal), but to the problems arising at the interfaces with the management of energy, nature conservation, environmental protection, economic factors like unemployment and productivity, etc. This monograph separately describes present practices and the problems to be solved in each of the functional areas of waste management and at the important interfaces. Strategies for more efficient control are then proposed from a systems perspective. Systematic and objective means of solving problems become possible leading to optimal management and a positive contribution to economic development, not least through resource conservation. India is the particular context within which waste generation and management are discussed. In considering waste disposal techniques, special attention is given to sewage and radioactive wastes.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 90 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Adnan Enshassi, Abed Ayash and Sherif Mohamed

Knowledge and application of energy management during the life cycle of construction projects are lacking. The purpose of this paper is to identify and investigate the key…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge and application of energy management during the life cycle of construction projects are lacking. The purpose of this paper is to identify and investigate the key barriers that are faced by contracting firms in the implementation of energy management during building construction projects focussing on construction plants, as they are considered as the major energy users on site.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was employed and distributed using stratified random sampling to 100 contracting companies operating in the Gaza Strip. The collected data were analysed using the Statistical Programme for the Social Sciences (SPSS; Version 22) to identify the number of components that could represent the 31 identified barriers.

Findings

From the factor analysis, the barriers were clustered into four factors: economic and financial (which accounted for the largest percentage of variance), knowledge and information, legal and contractual, and organisational and management. This indicates that economic and financial aspects are the most important barrier impeding the implementation of energy management; local contractors should seriously consider this issue when making decisions about energy management during project construction. In addition, the lack of energy-management codes and lack of governmental support are significant obstacles to the implementation of energy management on construction sites.

Research limitations/implications

Although the objective of this study was achieved, there were some study limitations. This study is limited to the perceptions and geographical boundaries (i.e. the self-governing territory of Gaza Strip in Palestine as a developing country), therefore, it cannot be generalised. However, it could form the basis for useful comparison in the future. A future study may be carried out with a much larger sample size to validate the conclusions of this study. Triangulation research methods could also be employed in future research in order minimise the bias and validate the conclusion. Further study regarding energy management throughout the whole life cycle of the development is recommended.

Practical implications

This paper has highlighted a number of barriers to efficient energy management during the project construction phase. It is critical for local regulators to take note of the economic and financial barriers to facilitate a more energy-conscious society where incentives (could be via tendering preferences) can encourage both clients and contractors to proactively conserve energy during construction. As for the contractual barriers, the local government should lead by example in including “energy consumption” as a leading indicator for evaluating project performance.

Originality/value

This study also provides practical knowledge for stakeholders so that they can develop effective methods to overcome the identified barriers to attain higher levels of sustainable energy management. This study can contribute to knowledge in the developing countries context concerning energy management and conservation in construction projects.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Angela Lewis, Abbas Elmualim and David Riley

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings and lessons learned from three case studies conducted for facilities located in California, North America. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings and lessons learned from three case studies conducted for facilities located in California, North America. The findings aim to focus on energy and maintenance management practices and the interdependent link between energy and maintenance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a positivist epistemological philosophical approach informed by action research. The research cycle was completed for each case study. A case study report was provided to each facility management team to foster collaboration with the researcher and to document case study process and results.

Findings

Composite findings of the case studies include: there is an interdependent link between energy and maintenance management; reactive maintenance and energy management methods are commonly used; and more proactively operated and managed buildings require the interdependent link between energy maintenance management to be better understood.

Research limitations/implications

The three case studies were located in California. Although the case study results can be generalized, determination of how to generalize and apply the results to commercial buildings outside of the USA is beyond the scope of this paper.

Practical implications

Detailed discussion of the needs of the three facility management teams are discussed by identifying a current challenge, developing a solution and documenting lessons learned using the research cycle.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to demonstrate the interdependencies of energy and maintenance management, two topics which are often researched interdependently. Additionally, the paper provides insight about maintenance management, a topic often cited as being under researched.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1982

The Debenham Group aware of the escalating energy costs incurred in their department stores and associated premises have formed their own energy management company …

Abstract

The Debenham Group aware of the escalating energy costs incurred in their department stores and associated premises have formed their own energy management company — Welsmere Energy Management Ltd. Based at Welsmere House, Basingstoke, Hants, the new company has been formed from the nucleus of staff which comprised the engineering department at Debenhams Head Office, plus additional specialist enegineers. Their function previously was the design and supervision of engineering services associated with new and refurbished Debenhams stores and warehouses, and this has now been extended to provide a complete energy management service to industry and commerce. This covers building services design and project management, energy management control systems, energy auditing and cost management, and planned engineering maintenance.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 82 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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