Search results

1 – 10 of over 84000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Paul Meyer

Most computer users are familiar with the idea of the online tutorial and online help functions, as these apply to database, spreadsheet and wordprocessing programs. Such…

Abstract

Most computer users are familiar with the idea of the online tutorial and online help functions, as these apply to database, spreadsheet and wordprocessing programs. Such programs vary in complexity, and full training of some depth is usually required, which may come from formal courses, manuals or online tutors. Two trends, however, have emerged which require that a simpler approach to computer training is adopted: namely the increasing use of enduser information retrieval systems, and the spread of networks which make these systems available in a decentralised environment. Endusers in a networked system may now have to rely less on centralised formal training and more on help provided by the systems themselves, which places a burden on system designers to provide such help functions. However, system designers are not always the best people to provide proper help functions as they do not necessarily understand the users' perceptions of the systems. The people better suited for this are the information specialists and librarians who deal with the enduser on a daily basis. A good example of a networked enduser system is the OPAC, the online catalogue, which may have thousands of users with different levels of computer experience, all of whom have to be taught to make use of the computer system in the simplest way possible. The challenge here is to understand how the OPAC enduser perceives the bibliographic record, and how to inculcate an understanding of the new ways of accessing records that the computer provides. In designing an online help system, the expertise of professional teachers may also have to be sought in order to ensure proper communication between the information specialist and the enduser. In this paper, the experience gained in installing the OPAC at the University of Cape Town Libraries is used to illustrate these points.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 9 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Morteza Namvar, Ali Intezari and Ghiyoung Im

Business analytics (BA) has been a breakthrough technological development in recent years. Although scholars have suggested several solutions in using these technologies…

Downloads
286

Abstract

Purpose

Business analytics (BA) has been a breakthrough technological development in recent years. Although scholars have suggested several solutions in using these technologies to facilitate decision-making, there are as of yet limited studies on how analysts, in practice, improve decision makers' understanding of business environments. This study uses sensemaking theory and proposes a model of how data analysts generate analytical outcomes to improve decision makers' understanding of the business environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an interpretive field study with thematic analysis. The authors conducted 32 interviews with data analysts and consultants in Australia and New Zealand. The authors then applied thematic analysis to the collected data.

Findings

The thematic analysis discovered four main sensegiving activities, including data integration, trustworthiness analysis, appropriateness analysis and alternative selection. The proposed model demonstrates how these activities support the properties of sensemaking and result in improved decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides strong empirical evidence for the theory development and practice of sensemaking. It brings together two distinct fields – sensemaking and business analytics – and demonstrates how the approaches advocated by these two fields could improve analytics applications. The findings also propose theoretical implications for information system development (ISD).

Practical implications

This study demonstrates how data analysts could use analytical tools and social mechanisms to improve decision makers' understanding of the business environment.

Originality/value

This study is the first known empirical study to conceptualize the theory of sensemaking in the context of BA and propose a model for analytical sensegiving in organizations.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Roger K. Summit

Some of you will remember a search system called Leadermart which was developed at Lehigh University in the early 1970s under the direction of Don Hillman. Don viewed…

Abstract

Some of you will remember a search system called Leadermart which was developed at Lehigh University in the early 1970s under the direction of Don Hillman. Don viewed Leadermart as one of the few early systems designed for end users rather than information specialists. He attributed its lack of acceptance by information specialists to the marriage of librarians to Boolean searching and their unwillingness to try anything new. Leadermart, however, was not particularly popular with end users either. In my opinion Leadermart's lack of acceptance was primarily due to the quality of results it produced. Also this is important in evaluating current ‘expert systems’ approaches to searching. With Leadermart, if you didn't get good results you had no way of knowing how to change your request to improve the results. Some people pursuing the end user today feel simpler interfaces of the Leadermart type are the single answer to capturing this vast market. In what follows I hope to show that the problem is substantially more complex than suggested by this simple solution.

Details

Online Review, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Miriam Farber and Snunith Shoham

Discusses the changing relationships between information professionals – vendors, database producers, searchers – and endusers, during the last three decades. Most of the…

Downloads
1514

Abstract

Discusses the changing relationships between information professionals – vendors, database producers, searchers – and endusers, during the last three decades. Most of the time, the industry was quite vague as to who exactly the endusers were, and consequently several different definitions were used to describe the target audience of online information systems. The needs and capabilities of the enduser were measured conveniently through the reactions of libraries’ and information centres’ personnel who were not always the most suitable sources. The concept of the “enduser” is examined from the beginning of the online industry in the 1970s through the menu driven systems of the 1980s and the role of the compact disk in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 March 2019

Zehra Waheed and Stephen O. Ogunlana

This study aims to investigate projects as social exchange networks, focussing on identifying knowledge brokers within the project network where they are key holders and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate projects as social exchange networks, focussing on identifying knowledge brokers within the project network where they are key holders and disseminators of end-user needs. The purpose is to augment current theory through a practice lens so that building end-user requirements can be better incorporated in evolving project ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive, an inductive case study is used to map knowledge brokers during a complex construction and co-location project. During the wider study, a variety of methods including archival data, interviews and questionnaires along with social network analysis (SNA) were used. The mixed methodology used has been pivotal in the triangulation of data from various sources. However, the output of SNA presented in this paper relies mostly on interviews and questionnaires administered to the project’s core network. Network relationships were mapped with knowledge of user requirements, being the key determinant of the binary relationships between actors.

Findings

The research found certain roles to be central knowledge brokers of knowledge related to end-user processes, including real estate and strategic planning, building operations and management, human and environmental factors, planning and project management and facility and service delivery. The knowledge of the above roles, albeit in a contextually situated case study, augments current understanding of which roles to tap on during project execution for better representation of end-user needs.

Practical implications

The research site is representative of a complex network of construction project stakeholders, including several categories of end-users and their representatives. The study demonstrates the use of the project-as-practice approach, whereby project theory is seen to emerge directly from practice. This has impact on practice as emergent theory about knowledge transfer and knowledge brokerage is essentially practice-led and hence more useful and relate-able to practitioners.

Originality/value

Research presented here is novel in terms of its approach towards understanding end-user needs such as need for privacy, control, attachment and interaction during construction projects. This is done through the identification of relevant knowledge brokers. The study uses SNA as an analytical tool to map knowledge transfers through the project’s network. End-user requirements are usually captured in the front-end of projects as specifications and deliverables, as new challenges emerge during execution, changes are required to the project’s direction and outcomes. It is therefore imperative that end-user needs are re-identified through knowledge brokers holding key knowledge. This allows project managers to prepare appropriate responses to changing project ecosystems.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Mikko Nousiainen and Seppo Junnila

The study was set to determine the environmental objectives of building enduser organizations in an office environment and to anticipate the environmental management…

Downloads
2441

Abstract

Purpose

The study was set to determine the environmental objectives of building enduser organizations in an office environment and to anticipate the environmental management demands this could set on facility management.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study uses four independent data sets and triangulation approach by combining data archives with time series analysis method, semi‐structured interviews, case study and a survey.

Findings

The results of the paper state the gap between the environmental objectives and practical management of environmental issues. Same environmental management themes, namely energy efficiency, waste management and reduction of climate change emissions, seem to be important for endusers of buildings. A new trend, in which the endusers require facility organizations to provide environmental management services, was observed as well. Enduser companies wish to receive comprehensive reporting and recommendations on improving a company's or facilities' environmental performance.

Research limitations/implications

Since the study included only globally and/or environmentally active endusers, the results of the survey are most representative for large European or North American companies which are progressive in environmental management. Future research is suggested to focus on information management, collaboration and communication between facility and enduser companies.

Practical implications

At the practical level, the potential of FM has not yet been well utilized due to the lack of communication and understanding by both parties. Facility management companies can make use of the findings, e.g. when developing more comprehensive services or evaluating their own operations.

Originality/value

The results anticipate present and upcoming trend of endusers' setting environmental requirement for FM organizations.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Sally Lyon

Literature related to enduser searching of online databases is cited and annotated. Questions such as the role of the librarian/intermediary, the cost effectiveness of end

Abstract

Literature related to enduser searching of online databases is cited and annotated. Questions such as the role of the librarian/intermediary, the cost effectiveness of enduser searching, and the training of enduser searchers are addressed by the cited literature. Articles and conference papers from 1981–1984 are covered.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Frank Lin and C.E. Tapie Rohm

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether differences also exist between managers and endusers regarding critical success factors (CSFs) of enterprise resource…

Downloads
2039

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether differences also exist between managers and endusers regarding critical success factors (CSFs) of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems implementation in China as well as among the counterparts in US and Chinese companies.

Design/methodology/approach

A pharmaceutical company in China that implemented an ERP system recently, similar to the one identified in Amoako‐Gyampah's study, is identified for this paper. A field survey accompanied by interview was used to collect data on seven CSFs that have been identified in the literature on technology acceptance and diffusion and that are consistent with Amoako‐Gyampah's study for comparison purposes.

Findings

The results of this paper confirm the results of Amoako‐Gyampah's study, which demonstrates that significant differences of seven CSFs of the implementation of ERP systems do exist in the perception of managers and endusers. It further shows that both managers and endusers of Chinese companies rate all seven factors lower than do their US counterparts. The understanding of these differences reveals the current stage of the progress of ERP implementation in China, namely that ERP implementation is not perceived as positively by Chinese managers and endusers as it is by their counterparts in the USA

Research limitations/implications

For researchers, this paper provides a foundation for further investigation of the reasons for such differences among different groups and individuals as well as different cultures.

Practical implications

Understanding the differences that exist in the perceptions of different groups within an organization and the nature of these differences can help implementers develop appropriate change management mechanisms – such as training, communication, and others – to improve the chances of successful ERP implementation.

Originality/value

This paper confirms the previous CSFs research findings in a Chinese pharmaceutical company setting that there are significant differences of CSFs in ERP implementation between managers and endusers. It further compares the differences of these CSFs with their US counterparts.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Ina Fourie

The implications of disintermediation for librarians and information specialists (intermediaries) can be experienced as either a threat of a challenge, depending on how…

Downloads
1728

Abstract

The implications of disintermediation for librarians and information specialists (intermediaries) can be experienced as either a threat of a challenge, depending on how the issue is viewed. The different ways in which information specialists can react to disintermediation are discussed. Although most of these are viable, none addresses all implications of disintermediation. A holistic approach to disintermediation is therefore proposed, in which the situation of the intermediary is viewed within the wider society. The following aspects should be analysed with regard to their effect on disintermediation: changes in the society at large, the availability of information sources, the process of information searching, the specific organisations in which intermediaries operate, and the availability of information services. The specific endusers and the information specialists involved should also be analysed. With this approach it will be found that the effects of disintermediation will vary according to the particular situations. To prepare information specialists for the effects of disintermediation, their training should also be adapted accordingly.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Pak-Lok Poon, Fei-Ching Kuo, Huai Liu and Tsong Yueh Chen

An alarming number of spreadsheet faults have been reported in the literature, indicating that effective and easy-to-apply spreadsheet testing techniques are not available…

Abstract

Purpose

An alarming number of spreadsheet faults have been reported in the literature, indicating that effective and easy-to-apply spreadsheet testing techniques are not available for “non-technical,” end-user programmers. The purpose of this paper is to alleviate the problem by introducing a metamorphic testing (MT) technique for spreadsheets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discussed four common challenges encountered by end-user programmers when testing a spreadsheet. The MT technique was then discussed and how it could be used to solve the common challenges was explained. An experiment involving several “real-world” spreadsheets was performed to determine the viability and effectiveness of MT.

Findings

The experiment confirmed that MT is highly effective in spreadsheet fault detection, and yet MT is a general technique that can be easily used by end-user programmers to test a large variety of spreadsheet applications.

Originality/value

The paper provides a detailed discussion of some common challenges of spreadsheet testing encountered by end-user programmers. To the best of the authors knowledge, the paper is the first that includes an empirical study of how effective MT is in spreadsheet fault detection from an end-user programmer's perspective.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 84000