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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2007

Alice Shiner and Jennifer Stothard

National evidence shows that around 60% of patients would prefer to receive end of life care and die at home, but in 2005 in North Derbyshire only 20% of patients were…

Abstract

National evidence shows that around 60% of patients would prefer to receive end of life care and die at home, but in 2005 in North Derbyshire only 20% of patients were supported to do so. This article discusses the tools used to improve end of life care services in the community and explores the enablers and barriers.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

John Conway O'Brien

A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balanceeconomics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary toman′s finding the good life and society…

Abstract

A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balance economics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary to man′s finding the good life and society enduring as a civilized instrumentality. Looks for authority to great men of the past and to today′s moral philosopher: man is an ethical animal. The 13 essays are: 1. Evolutionary Economics: The End of It All? which challenges the view that Darwinism destroyed belief in a universe of purpose and design; 2. Schmoller′s Political Economy: Its Psychic, Moral and Legal Foundations, which centres on the belief that time‐honoured ethical values prevail in an economy formed by ties of common sentiment, ideas, customs and laws; 3. Adam Smith by Gustav von Schmoller – Schmoller rejects Smith′s natural law and sees him as simply spreading the message of Calvinism; 4. Pierre‐Joseph Proudhon, Socialist – Karl Marx, Communist: A Comparison; 5. Marxism and the Instauration of Man, which raises the question for Marx: is the flowering of the new man in Communist society the ultimate end to the dialectical movement of history?; 6. Ethical Progress and Economic Growth in Western Civilization; 7. Ethical Principles in American Society: An Appraisal; 8. The Ugent Need for a Consensus on Moral Values, which focuses on the real dangers inherent in there being no consensus on moral values; 9. Human Resources and the Good Society – man is not to be treated as an economic resource; man′s moral and material wellbeing is the goal; 10. The Social Economist on the Modern Dilemma: Ethical Dwarfs and Nuclear Giants, which argues that it is imperative to distinguish good from evil and to act accordingly: existentialism, situation ethics and evolutionary ethics savour of nihilism; 11. Ethical Principles: The Economist′s Quandary, which is the difficulty of balancing the claims of disinterested science and of the urge to better the human condition; 12. The Role of Government in the Advancement of Cultural Values, which discusses censorship and the funding of art against the background of the US Helms Amendment; 13. Man at the Crossroads draws earlier themes together; the author makes the case for rejecting determinism and the “operant conditioning” of the Skinner school in favour of the moral progress of autonomous man through adherence to traditional ethical values.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Marc van den Berg, Hans Voordijk and Arjen Adriaanse

The purpose of this study is to explore how demolition contractors coordinate project activities for buildings at their end-of-life. The organizations are thereby…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how demolition contractors coordinate project activities for buildings at their end-of-life. The organizations are thereby conceptualized as information processing systems facing uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-case study methodology was selected to gain in-depth insights from three projects with different end-of-life strategies: a faculty building (material recycling), a nursing home (component reuse) and a psychiatric hospital (element reuse). Using a theory elaboration approach, the authors sought to explain how and why demolition contractors process information for end-of-life coordination.

Findings

End-of-life strategies differ in the degree of building, workflow and environmental uncertainty posed to the demolition contractor. Whether or not a strategy is effective depends on the (mis)match between the specific levels of uncertainty and the adopted coordination mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

The explanatory account on end-of-life coordination refines information processing theory for the context of (selective) demolition projects.

Practical implications

The detailed case descriptions and information processing perspective enable practitioners to select, implement and reflect on coordination mechanisms for demolition/deconstruction projects at hand.

Originality/value

Reflecting its dual conceptual-empirical and inductive-deductive focus, this study contributes with new opportunities to explain building end-of-life coordination with a refined theory.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Randall Smith

The purpose of this paper is to trace the history of official policy on the regulation of care homes in respect of end of life care and to contrast this with the results of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the history of official policy on the regulation of care homes in respect of end of life care and to contrast this with the results of research on this important theme, not least in terms of what is required to support care home staff in relation to dying residents and their relatives. A central concern is to argue for the open recognition that care homes now cater primarily for frail people towards the end of their lives. Good end of life care and a good death could become a positive “selling point”. The author concludes that the system of regulation has broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in a residential home. Death talk should no longer need to be avoided in care homes. The research suggests that appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment. A cultural shift is required.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of policy documents on regulation and standards of care in residential homes and a subsequent review of the research literature on death and dying in care homes, the paper illuminates the contrast between the ambitious aims in policy documents with very varied practice in everyday care of frail residents.

Findings

The recent systems of regulation have broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in residential homes. Open acknowledgement of death and dying should not be avoided in care homes. Appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment.

Originality/value

The focus of this paper is to contrast official policy with everyday practice. Whilst policy documents suggest recognition of the importance of dignity and respect from dying residents, the research literature indicates great variation in the practice of everyday care.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1982

“Communism has never concealed the fact that it rejects all absolute concepts of morality. It scoffs at any consideration of “good” and “evil” as indisputable categories…

Abstract

“Communism has never concealed the fact that it rejects all absolute concepts of morality. It scoffs at any consideration of “good” and “evil” as indisputable categories. Communism considers morality to be relative, to be a class matter… It has infected the whole world with the belief in the relativity of good and evil.” Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, Warning to the West, 1975.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Tina Maschi, Suzanne Marmo and Junghee Han

The growing numbers of terminally ill and dying in prison has high economic and moral costs as global correctional systems and the society at large. However, to date…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing numbers of terminally ill and dying in prison has high economic and moral costs as global correctional systems and the society at large. However, to date little is known about the extent to which palliative and end-of-life care is infused within global prison health care systems. The purpose of this paper is to fill a gap in the literature by reviewing and critically appraising the methods and major findings of the international peer-reviewed literature on palliative and end-of-life care in prison, identify the common elements of promising palliative and end-of-life services in prison, and what factors facilitate or create barrier to implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis was conducted of the existing peer-reviewed literature on palliative and end-of-life care in prison. English-language articles were located through a comprehensive search of peer-reviewed journals, such as Academic Search Premier Literature databases using differing combinations of key word search terms, “prison,” “palliative care,” and “end-of-life care.” A total of 49 studies published between 1991 and 2013 met criteria for sample inclusion. Deductive and inductive analysis techniques were used to generate frequency counts and common themes related to the methods and major findings.

Findings

The majority (n=39) of studies were published between 2001-2013 in the USA (n=40) and the UK (n=7). Most were about US prison hospice programs (n=16) or barriers to providing palliative and end of life care in prisons (n=10). The results of the inductive analysis identified common elements of promising practices, which included the use of peer volunteers, multi-disciplinary teams, staff training, and partnerships with community hospices. Obstacles identified for infusing palliative and end-of-life care in prison included ethical dilemmas based on custody vs care, mistrust between staff and prisoners, safety concerns, concern over prisoners’ potential misuse of pain medication, and institutional, staff, and public apathy toward terminally ill prisoners and their human rights to health in the form of compassionate and palliative care, including the use of compassionate release laws.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for future research that foster human rights and public awareness of the economic and moral costs of housing the sick and dying in prisons. More research is needed to document human rights violations as well as best practices and evidence-based practices in palliative and end-of-life care in prisons. Future studies should incorporate data from the terminally ill in prison, peer supports, and family members. Future studies also should employ more rigorous research designs to evaluate human rights violations, staff and public attitudes, laws and policies, and best practices. Quantitative studies that use experimental designs, longitudinal data, and multiple informants are needed. Qualitative data would allow for thick descriptions of key stakeholders experiences, especially of the facilitators and barriers for implementing policy reform efforts and palliative care in prisons.

Practical implications

This review provides a foundation on which to build on about what is known thus far about the human right to health, especially parole policy reform and infusing palliative and end-of-life care for the terminally ill and dying in prisons. This information can be used to develop or improve a new generation research, practice, policy, and advocacy efforts for that target terminally ill and dying in prison and their families and communities.

Social implications

There are significant social implications to this review. From a human rights perspective, the right to freedom from torture and cruel and unusual punishment is a fundamental human right along with prisoners’ rights for an appropriate level of health care. These rights should be guaranteed regardless of the nature of their crime or whether they are in a prison placement. The information provided in this review can be used to educate and possible transform individual's and society's views toward the terminally ill and dying who are involved in the criminal justice system.

Originality/value

This paper extends the extant literature by using both quantitative and qualitative analysis methods to organize, summarize, and critically analyze the international literature on palliative care and end of life care in prison. This review is designed to increase awareness among the international community of the pain and suffering of the terminally ill in prison and the facilitators and barriers to providing them compassionate care while in custody.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Li‐teh Sun

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the…

Abstract

Man has been seeking an ideal existence for a very long time. In this existence, justice, love, and peace are no longer words, but actual experiences. How ever, with the American preemptive invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq and the subsequent prisoner abuse, such an existence seems to be farther and farther away from reality. The purpose of this work is to stop this dangerous trend by promoting justice, love, and peace through a change of the paradigm that is inconsistent with justice, love, and peace. The strong paradigm that created the strong nation like the U.S. and the strong man like George W. Bush have been the culprit, rather than the contributor, of the above three universal ideals. Thus, rather than justice, love, and peace, the strong paradigm resulted in in justice, hatred, and violence. In order to remove these three and related evils, what the world needs in the beginning of the third millenium is the weak paradigm. Through the acceptance of the latter paradigm, the golden mean or middle paradigm can be formulated, which is a synergy of the weak and the strong paradigm. In order to understand properly the meaning of these paradigms, however, some digression appears necessary.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2011

Eva Kahana, Boaz Kahana, Loren Lovegreen, Jeffrey Kahana, Jane Brown and Diana Kulle

This chapter discusses challenges faced by older adult health-care consumers in obtaining access to responsive care from physicians relevant to a broad spectrum of health…

Abstract

This chapter discusses challenges faced by older adult health-care consumers in obtaining access to responsive care from physicians relevant to a broad spectrum of health issues ranging from prevention to chronic illness and end-of-life care. Based on our prior research with community-dwelling elders (E. Kahana & B. Kahana, 2003, 2010), we propose a conceptual model of consumer self-advocacy for better access to effective health care in late life. We argue that older adults who are well informed and confident health-care partners and who involve their physicians in active dialogue will experience better care, and will be more satisfied with their health care. We present findings from our studies of cancer prevention and from our research focused on end-of-life care relevant to patient self-advocacy. We also discuss the role of educational interventions and of patient empowerment in facilitating greater access to responsive health communication and health care, particularly among elders who are disadvantaged and who have low health literacy.

Details

Access to Care and Factors that Impact Access, Patients as Partners in Care and Changing Roles of Health Providers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-716-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Tushna Vandrevala, Sarah Hampson and Theopisti Chrysanthaki

The greater availability of life‐sustaining technology, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the medical, legal and moral pressures to use them, often enable the…

Abstract

The greater availability of life‐sustaining technology, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the medical, legal and moral pressures to use them, often enable the prolongation of lives of older people. The dying process can be extended regardless of quality of life. Further, there is much public debate on the increasing emphasis on individual rights and personal autonomy in the dying process. This qualitative study examined older people's perspectives on endoflife decision‐making and advance care planning. A sample of 12 older people living in the community was recruited and studied in‐depth. A semi‐structured interview explored patients' conceptualisations of decision‐making in the later stages of life and the significant others they would like involved in the process. The data were analysed using ‘content analysis’. The resulting broad categories, themes and sub‐themes formed the foundation of an emerging model of older people talking about endoflife care. Finally, results were discussed with regard to practice and policy development.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Catherine Evans and Claire Goodman

The second in a new series about mental health in old age, this article reviews policies and research evidence on services for people with dementia at the end of their…

Abstract

The second in a new series about mental health in old age, this article reviews policies and research evidence on services for people with dementia at the end of their lives, and looks at future commissioning priorities

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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