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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2011

Paul Sandford, Ed Cooper and Jim Shepherd

This is the first part of a two‐part paper that considers the assessment criteria for incapacity benefit (IB) and employment and support allowance (ESA) and how these…

Abstract

This is the first part of a two‐part paper that considers the assessment criteria for incapacity benefit (IB) and employment and support allowance (ESA) and how these benefits apply to claimants who are unable to work because they experience episodes of lost or altered consciousness.Part one considers how the IB/ESA appraisal system works in practice and looks specifically at the legal interpretation of lost and altered consciousness. Part two, which will be published in a future issue, will give practical guidance to advisers.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2017

Abstract

Details

Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Kate Blamires

The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis of current and previous government policies and strategies, in relation to people with learning disabilities and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a synthesis of current and previous government policies and strategies, in relation to people with learning disabilities and employment, to facilitate a better understanding of the current situation and future challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A search was completed to identify government policies relating to the employment of people with learning disabilities. Key policies were identified and their impact was discussed in the paper.

Findings

It appears there is a necessity to identify how successful pilot projects can be replicated on a national scale, with clear targets and measures and initial financial support to set up these services. Alongside this there is a need for interventions targeting not just employers, but the general population, educating people about the importance of including and valuing people with learning disabilities in the workforce.

Originality/value

It is important that policy is analysed and the impact of it is assessed to determine whether more action is necessary. This paper adds updates to some of the issues discussed in Melling et al.’s (2011) paper about “Supported employment for people with learning disabilities”.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

John Sapani

Recovery principles have been central to debates in both the government and the mental health field, when thinking about the best way to support people who have…

Abstract

Purpose

Recovery principles have been central to debates in both the government and the mental health field, when thinking about the best way to support people who have experienced mental health distress into employment and education. The purpose of this paper is to review how this principle has been employed within the most effective approaches. This information will contribute to the development of the South London and Maudsley (SLaM) NHS Foundation Trust apprenticeship/return-to-work scheme for people who have experienced mental health distress.

Design/methodology/approach

NHS evidence was used to undertake searches journals on CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, HMIC, AMED, BNI, HEALTH BUSINESS ELITE and the Cochrane Library. Common search terms used were as follows: apprentice*; mental illness*; mental disorder*; psychiatric; psychosis; chronic mental disorder*; patient*; service user*; client*; return to work schemes; work; employment; unemployment; peer worker*; supported employment; vocational rehabilitation; peer training*; outcome measure*; recovery.

Findings

Although the available literature writing about these employment schemes were not explicit in using Recovery as its guiding principle (i.e. Hope, Control and Opportunity), many of the participants in studies about a particular type of supported employment called Individual Placement Support (IPS) referred to recovery concepts in their narrative accounts, i.e. doing work that is meaningful, building self-esteem. This particular type of employment scheme was shown to have better outcomes for people who have experienced mental health difficulties then others schemes. The importance of employers having systems in place to support people’s control/self-management of their mental health condition was a key factor in helping them retain jobs once they have got them.

Originality/value

The SLaM education and training service plans to develop a return to work programme for people who have had lived experience of mental health distress, through a workforce skills apprenticeships scheme. This is first apprenticeship scheme of this type in London. Therefore, this paper will review the literature on previous and current employment programmes for people who have experienced mental health distress, specifically highlighting what has worked well and what could be improved. This paper will also draw on the literature presented in this review and conclude on key points, which will contribute to the development of SLaM’s apprenticeships scheme. This literature review will form the basis of further research about the outcome/evaluation of the actual apprenticeship scheme after the first year.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2017

Simon Roberts, Bruce Stafford and Katherine Hill

The UK Coalition government introduced a raft of welfare reforms between 2010 and 2015. As part of its response to the financial crisis, reforms were designed to cut…

Abstract

The UK Coalition government introduced a raft of welfare reforms between 2010 and 2015. As part of its response to the financial crisis, reforms were designed to cut public expenditure on social security and enhance work incentives. Policy makers are required by legislation to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations between different people. This Public Sector Equality Duty is an evidence-based duty which requires public authorities to assess the likely effects of policy on vulnerable groups. This chapter explores the extent to which the Department for Work and Pensions adequately assessed the equality impacts of key welfare reforms when policy was being formulated. The chapter focuses on the assessment of the impact of reductions to welfare benefits on individuals with protected characteristics – age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion and belief, sex and sexual orientation – including individual and cumulative impacts. It also considers mitigating actions to offset negative impacts and how the collection of evidence on equality impacts was used when formulating policy. The chapter shows that the impacts of the reforms were only systematically assessed by age and gender, and, where data were available, by disability and ethnicity with no attempt to gauge cumulative impacts. There is also evidence of Equality Impact Assessments finding a disproportionate impact on individuals with protected characteristics where no mitigating action was taken.

Details

Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

David Booth, Simon Francis, Neil Mcivor, Patrick Hinson and Benjamin Barton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the economic benefits of Individual Placement with Support programmes commissioned by NHS North in the North West and Yorkshire and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the economic benefits of Individual Placement with Support programmes commissioned by NHS North in the North West and Yorkshire and Humber regions.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted and data collected from supported employment programmes in four localities. An econometric analysis was performed to evaluate likely savings for local commissioners and return on investment for the Treasury.

Findings

Integration of employment support within mental health services is central to success. Econometric analysis showed that local commissioners could save £1,400 per additional job outcome by commissioning evidence-based interventions and there is a positive return on investment to the Treasury for every £1 spent there is a return to the Treasury of £1.04.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the economic and social value of evidence-based supported employment for people with severe mental illness. The economic data generated could be helpful in encouraging investment in effective employment support in other areas. The work, views and perspectives contained in this paper are those of the authors. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the organisations for whom the authors work.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 March 2010

Paul Milbourne

These reforms offer a vision of a fairer welfare system where truly no one is written off, where nearly everyone is preparing or looking for work, where everyone is…

Abstract

These reforms offer a vision of a fairer welfare system where truly no one is written off, where nearly everyone is preparing or looking for work, where everyone is treated as an individual and gets the support they need. More importantly, these reforms point the way to a fairer society where children don't grow up in poverty, where disabled people enjoy real equality, and everyone is given real help to overcome the barriers to achieving their full potential. (DWP, 2008, p. 8)Workfare has finally arrived in the UK, but not with trumpet blasts of outrage: it's been smuggled in with lofty rhetoric about ‘personalisation’, ‘individually tailored’ advice and support which will enable people to ‘take control of their journey to work'. (Bunting, 2009)

Details

Welfare Reform in Rural Places: Comparative Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-919-0

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

José Iparraguirre

The purpose of this paper is to present an econometric analysis of hate crime against older people based on data for England and Wales for 2010-2011 disaggregated by Crown…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an econometric analysis of hate crime against older people based on data for England and Wales for 2010-2011 disaggregated by Crown Prosecution Service area – a geographical unit which is co-terminus with local authorities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors ran different specifications of structural regression models including one latent variable and accounting for a number of interactions between the covariates.

Findings

The paper suggests that the higher the level of other types of hate crime is in an area, the higher the level of hate crime against older people. Demographics are also significant: a higher concentration of older and young people partially explains hate crime levels against the former. Employment, income and educational deprivation are also associated with biased-crime against older people. Conviction rates seem to reduce hate crime against older people, and one indicator of intergenerational contact is not significant.

Research limitations/implications

Due to data availability and quality, the paper only studies one years worth of data. Consequently, the research results may lack generalisability. Furthermore, the proxy variable for intergenerational contact may not be the most suitable indicator; however, there will not be any other indicators available until Census data come out.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that factors underlying hate crime would also influence hate crime against older people. Besides, the results would not support the “generational clash” view. Tackling income, educational and employment deprivation would help significantly reduce the number of episodes of biased criminal activity against older people. Improving conviction rates of all types of hate crime would also contribute to the reduction of hate crime against older people.

Originality/value

This paper presents the first econometric analysis of hate crime against older people.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Sophie Corlett

The Policy Watch series reflects on recent and forthcoming developments in mental health policy across the UK. This paper aims to review the impact of welfare reforms on…

146

Abstract

Purpose

The Policy Watch series reflects on recent and forthcoming developments in mental health policy across the UK. This paper aims to review the impact of welfare reforms on people with mental health problems. As well as focusing at specific problems with the current system, the paper criticises the general “direction of travel” in welfare policy and calls for a rethink of fundamental assumptions that underpin this.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews and summarizes recent and longer term developments in national welfare and benefits policy in England and Wales and their implications for people with mental health problems.

Findings

The paper describes how key components of the current disability benefits system are not working for people with mental health problems and also how the design of welfare reform over recent years has been ineffective for supporting the health and employment aspirations of people with mental health problems.

Originality/value

The paper updates and discusses knowledge on recent and forthcoming welfare reform and cites recent evidence from Government.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Paul Sandford, Ed Cooper and Jim Shepherd

This is the second instalment of a two‐part paper that aims to consider the assessment criteria for incapacity benefit (IB) and employment and support allowance (ESA) and

Abstract

Purpose

This is the second instalment of a two‐part paper that aims to consider the assessment criteria for incapacity benefit (IB) and employment and support allowance (ESA) and to analyse how this benefit applies to claimants who are unable to work because they experience episodes of lost or altered consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

In the first part of the paper, which featured in Social Care and Neurodisability, Vol. 2 No. 1, the authors considered the legal meaning of lost or altered consciousness and explained how the IB/ESA appraisal and appeals system operates. This second instalment gives practical guidance to advisers who are assisting their clients in applying for ESA and appealing negative decisions to the tribunal (given its ever increasing importance, this paper focuses on ESA; however, the same considerations apply to IB cases).

Findings

The paper highlights the complexities and limitations of the benefit system for those suffering with lost and altered consciousness.

Practical implications

Advisers need to think laterally when assisting their clients.

Originality/value

The paper should provide a useful reference point for advisers.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000