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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Eileen Drew

The subject of part‐time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of…

Abstract

The subject of part‐time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialised economies where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total employment. It is estimated that in 1970, average annual hours worked per employee amounted to only 60% of those for 1870. Two major factors are attributed to explaining the underlying trend towards a reduction in working time: (a) the increase in the number of voluntary part‐time employees and (b) the decrease in average annual number of days worked per employee (Kok and de Neubourg, 1986). The authors noted that the growth rate of part‐time employment in many countries was greater than the corresponding rate of growth in full‐time employment.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 9 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Chenicheri Sid Nair and Patricie Mertova

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework that can be utilized in the design of graduate employer surveys carried out by tertiary institutions as a form of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework that can be utilized in the design of graduate employer surveys carried out by tertiary institutions as a form of monitoring their graduate attributes. It further aims to identify the potential issues and challenges that may be involved in undertaking such a survey.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes an approach to administering a graduate employer survey conducted at Monash University, Australia. The survey utilized a combination of means, involving telephone, e‐mail and mail‐outs. During a period of approximately four months, 2,753 companies were contacted and response was obtained from 464 of them. The survey instrument was based on 23 graduate attributes. In the course of the survey, employers were asked to rate graduate attributes in terms of importance and their satisfaction with the extent to which each of these attributes was demonstrated by Monash University graduates employed by the particular company. Open‐ended feedback was also sought from the employers.

Findings

Universities world‐wide have increasingly incorporated the development of the so‐called graduate attributes into their quality development mechanisms. One way of monitoring these graduate attributes has been through conducting graduate employer surveys. The paper presented a workable approach to collecting employer feedback, which may offer some guidance to other higher education institutions that may be considering introducing similar employer surveys. It also identified some of the issues and challenges involved in undertaking such a survey.

Practical implications

The paper discusses a number of practical limitations to administering an employer survey. These include the need for: a well‐sourced database of employers of the institution's graduates; established relations with industry and professional bodies; proper staffing and infrastructure; and awareness of timelines suitable for individual employers to complete such a survey. The implications for the university resulting from the limitations are that the leadership need to address these limitations in order to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the future iterations of the graduate employer survey. The limitations may also serve as guidance to other institutions concerning aspects they need to address when planning to conduct a similar survey.

Originality/value

Internationally, and certainly in Australia, there are very few higher education institutions that have well‐established graduate employer surveys. The Monash University graduate employer survey outlined here may offer some guidance to tertiary institutions considering conducting similar graduate employer surveys.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Abstract

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The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Francis D. Walsh and Seán Byrne

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors relating to retention of employers on an undergraduate work placement programme in a third level institution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors relating to retention of employers on an undergraduate work placement programme in a third level institution.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research methodology involving problem diagnosis, intervention planning, action and evaluation is employed. The diagnosis involved a survey of 130 employers that had taken students on placement during the first two years of the placement programme. The action research also involved workshops with the work placement team and the making of an intervention with respect to enhancing the placement process through the introduction of a Priority Partner initiative for 26 of the employers.

Findings

The survey findings reveal differences in the ranking of importance of college selection criteria by employers, as well the impact of the placement manager's characteristics on the placement process. The intervention findings show that the employer retention percentage increased for the Priority Partners but remained the same for the other employers.

Research limitations/implications

The study reports qualitative findings in the context of a placement programme in one institution which limits external validity.

Practical implications

Employer retention would seem to be improved with the development of a customer relations management orientation with employers. The role of the placement manager is pivotal to enhancing the retention of employers as is the quality and professionalism of the work placement service.

Originality/value

New empirical data extends the very limited understanding of company retention on work placement programmes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Mahsood Shah, Leonid Grebennikov and Chenicheri Sid Nair

The purpose of this paper is to outline four separate studies undertaken in two Australian universities between 2003 and 2012 on employer feedback on the quality of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline four separate studies undertaken in two Australian universities between 2003 and 2012 on employer feedback on the quality of university graduates. Higher education has expanded significantly in the past decade. The expansion has been in student enrolments with a focus on increasing the participation of disadvantaged students; the emergence of new kinds of providers other than universities; new modes of education delivery; and the internationalisation of higher education. The diversity of higher education institutions and quality issues require the assessment of graduate quality based on feedback from employers. The lack of such assessment on graduate quality based on employer voice risks the production of graduates with focus on success (quantity) rather than excellence (quality). It also disconnects the engagement between higher education institutions and employers to assess trends and changes in various industries and professions that require employer input in course development and renewal to meet the changing needs of the industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative method using online survey to gather feedback from employers of university graduates was used. The survey tool has been previously used in other studies.

Findings

A decade of study using quantitative and qualitative methods with different employers in two different geographic locations clearly shows that employer views on the quality of university graduates in a range of capabilities have remained consistent. The study also outlines the challenges in gathering feedback from employers and how data are used in curriculum reviews and enhancements.

Research limitations/implications

The study has a number of limitations, including gathering up-to-date employer data, and engagement of employers in the survey.

Practical implications

Practical implications could include the use of survey data in new course developments, review of courses and further enhancement to ensure course relevance.

Originality/value

This is the first longitudinal study undertaken using the same survey instrument in two universities. The study engaged 485 employers.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Jayne Beresford and Anita Sarris

Ordnance Survey was established in 1791 as a paper map maker for Britain's Armed Forces. Two hundred and nineteen years on, it has evolved to a high‐tech geographic data…

Abstract

Purpose

Ordnance Survey was established in 1791 as a paper map maker for Britain's Armed Forces. Two hundred and nineteen years on, it has evolved to a high‐tech geographic data specialist, and the impact of this on its culture, identity and vision has been massive. In 2008 Ordnance Survey found itself struggling to recruit and retain in technology and commercial fields. It also saw great challenges in motivating staff and bringing together a number of subcultures that had developed over time. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

It was critical to understand the current employer brand strengths and weaknesses, how Ordnance Survey is perceived externally, what it is like in reality, and its vision. This was achieved through solid research conducted internally and externally, including focus groups with existing staff, depth interviews with senior management and consultation with recruitment consultants, short‐service leavers and recent joiners.

Findings

The research highlighted some widely known strengths of Ordnance Survey, including its strong proud history, its flexibility and adaptability as an employer and the supportive working environment it offers. Some less well‐known attributes were also drawn out, including the innovative nature of the organization, its dynamic technology and the opportunity for staff to really make a difference.

Originality/value

This research led to the development of a compelling set of values which will inform how Ordnance Survey markets itself externally and interacts with employees, leading to better retention of skills, greater alignment with the vision and a strong reputation as a great employer.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Erling Rasmussen, Barry Foster and Deirdre Farr

The purpose of this paper is to place empirical research on New Zealand employers’ attitudes to collective bargaining and legislative change within the context of the long…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to place empirical research on New Zealand employers’ attitudes to collective bargaining and legislative change within the context of the long running debate of flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey design using a self-administered postal questionnaire, covering private sector employers with ten or more staff and including employers within all 17 standard industry classification. To explore particular issues, an additional in-depth interviews were conducted of 25 employers participating in the survey.

Findings

It is found that employers support overwhelmingly recent legislative changes though there are variations across industries and firm sizes. There is also considerable variation in terms of which legislative changes are applied in the workplace. Despite fewer constraints on employer-determined flexibility, there was a rather puzzling finding that most employers still think that employment legislation is even balanced or favouring employees.

Originality/value

Cross-sectional survey findings of New Zealand employer attitudes to legislative changes are few and provide valuable data for policy makers, unions, employers and employment relations researchers. The paper also contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of pressures to increase employer-determined flexibility in many western countries.

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Cynthia R. Jasper and Paul Waldhart

This paper seeks to analyze government survey data on what concerns leisure and hospitality employers most when considering hiring people with disabilities, as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to analyze government survey data on what concerns leisure and hospitality employers most when considering hiring people with disabilities, as well as what hiring practices best alleviate these concerns. Special attention is to be given to the theory of planned behavior in these aims.

Design/methodology/approach

US government survey data of leisure and hospitality employers' perspectives were disaggregated and examined using F‐, T‐, and Z‐tests.

Findings

Employee abilities and workplace accommodations raised substantial concerns, while financial incentives and practices addressing workplace attitudes were seen as especially helpful solutions. Employer concerns toward hiring varied significantly by employer size, with employers with more workers being more likely to hire those with disabilities than those with fewer workers.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should work to overcome limitations inherent in the source data used by further disaggregating business types within the leisure and hospitality industry, and to examine how socio‐demographic factors impact employer perceptions.

Originality/value

This is the first study to statistically test and apply the theory of planned behavior to the most recent nationally representative and randomized survey data of leisure and hospitality employer perceptions on hiring people with disabilities.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Diane M. Holtzman, Ellen M. Kraft and Emmanuel Small

The purpose of the study was to determine if representatives of small and large businesses in New Jersey believe portfolios would be valuable for evaluating applicants as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to determine if representatives of small and large businesses in New Jersey believe portfolios would be valuable for evaluating applicants as part of the hiring process and whether portfolios would help applicants in the hiring process.

Design/methodology/approach

Representatives from 109 small and 71 large businesses in New Jersey were surveyed about using portfolios in the hiring process.

Findings

Representatives from both small and large businesses believe that the submission of a portfolio of exemplary work may help the applicant and the employer in the hiring process.

Research limitations/implications

The study limitations are that the respondents had different definitions of ePortfolio, it was a convenience survey, and the researchers used two sets of data. For future research, conducting a study in a major region of the world would be a significant contribution to learning about the views of business representatives globally regarding the use of ePortfolios in the hiring decision process.

Practical implications

The authors recommend that educational institutions encourage students to create portfolios as part of their career preparation to gain an edge as applicants in the job market. EPortfolios are an emerging tool to help employers in the hiring decision process.

Social implications

EPortfolios would provide evidence of the employee's fit to the position, thus eliminating a mismatch of the employee's skill set and qualifications to the job. The ePortfolio aids the employer in seeing the candidate's skills for the position.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited research about the emergence of ePortfolios having a role in human resource decision making.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Robert W. Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the “skills gap” concerns that are increasingly prevalent in the USA and globally. In particular, the paper explores…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the “skills gap” concerns that are increasingly prevalent in the USA and globally. In particular, the paper explores the current skills gap debate as a component of the American economy. This is an important issue as there is an increased economic uncertainty and global competition impacting many sectors. The paper specifically defines the current skills gap dilemma with respect to the USA and uses the Tampa, FL example of the practical implications of these concerns using recent survey and focus group data.

Design/methodology/approach

The research for this paper includes an outline of the economic development structures in place in Tampa, FL, a description of the existing mandate(s) to improve workforce training; the review of a key recent, public record report on workforce skills; and, the results of a focus group developed using key stakeholders. Initially, a public record document report titled Clarus Corporation (2013) “Hillsborough Community College: Workforce Development Scan” was reviewed to provide context and preliminary data to guide the research. In the second phase, a survey was conducted to develop a focus group of 18 key stakeholders in Hillsborough County. Nine of these stakeholders represented the education sector. These were purposefully selected from the Tampa Bay Higher Education Alliance (TBHEA) which represents approximately 30 regionally accredited academic institutions in the Tampa community (TBHEA, n.d.). In addition, another nine respondents were selected by purposeful selection representing employers who had experience with workforce training and development initiatives.

Findings

The group survey conducted for this paper confirms concerns by both employers and educators with respect to the existing and the future skill sets of employees. In particular, respondents note that basic skills such as communication and technical skills need more attention. Also, the focus group respondents confirm the importance of technical service certification. Fundamentally, economic development professionals, educators and employers need to develop and implement strategies and action plans to ensure that the skills gap be identified correctly and properly addressed. These initiatives must be developed with broad stakeholder input and these initiatives must be viewed as dynamic reflecting changing circumstances.

Research limitations/implications

This research should be viewed as exploratory in nature. The research could serve as a template to develop and track the concerns and issues of key stakeholders in the economic development process with respect to skills in the workforce on a regional or indeed a statewide basis.

Practical implications

Nations, states and local governments are more active in structuring workforce development support mechanisms and specific training opportunities to assist employees and businesses. All levels of government highlight the fact that they have skilled, competitive employees to assist in recruiting new companies to consider locating in their respective jurisdictions and in retaining companies.

Social implications

Having a clear understanding of the skills being demanded by employers as they strive to remain globally competitive is important. Local economic development officials, academicians and employers must be on the same page. Although relationships between these sectors are critical flexibility and adaptability are key to reflect changing demands.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence of the perceptions employers and educators have with respect to the skills gap issue in a fast growth jurisdiction. This jurisdiction promotes itself as having an abundant and skilled labor force. Data suggest that there are some concerns emerging from stakeholders.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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