Search results

1 – 10 of over 68000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Dana Yagil

The study examined respective perceptions of justice within leader-employee dyads. Questionnaires were administered to 152 such dyads in a variety of organizational…

Abstract

The study examined respective perceptions of justice within leader-employee dyads. Questionnaires were administered to 152 such dyads in a variety of organizational settings. Employeesperceptions of interactional justice were found to mediate the relationship between the leader’s evaluation of the relationship (i.e., equity and the quality of the relationship), on the one hand, and the employee’s evaluation of the relationship and perception of procedural justice, on the other. Both procedural justice and interactional justice were related to job satisfaction through a partial mediation of the employee’s perception of the quality of the relationship. The results are discussed in regard to the effect of the leader-member social exchange on perceptions of justice

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Zonghua Liu, Yulang Guo, Junyun Liao, Yanping Li and Xu Wang

Despite past studies revealed the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on consumer advocacy behavior, little research has paid attention to employee

Abstract

Purpose

Despite past studies revealed the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on consumer advocacy behavior, little research has paid attention to employee advocacy behavior. This research aims to examine the relationship between CSR and employee advocacy behavior, the mediating role of meaningful work as well as the moderating effect of person–supervisor fit on CSR perception – meaningful work relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used 263 employee samples to examine the relationship between CSR and employee advocacy behavior and its influence mechanism. Hierarchical regression analyses and bootstrap approach were applied to analyze the data.

Findings

The results show that CSR perception is positively related to employee advocacy behavior, meaningful work mediates the link between CSR perception and employee advocacy behavior, and the strength of the relationship between CSR perception and meaningful work depends on person–supervisor fit.

Research limitations

This study only investigated the effect of perceived CSR on employee advocacy behavior, future studies should explore the alternative mediation mechanism through which external/internal CSR perception or different CSR dimensions influence employee advocacy behavior.

Practical implications

This study has practical implications for organizational managers. First, firms should undertake CSR practices and make employee interpret them in a right way. Second, meaningful work is of significance for employees and training and development, challenging jobs and job rotation are conducive to create a sense of meaning in employees’ work.

Originality/value

This study discussed how and when CSR influences employee advocacy in the Chinese context.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Zinta S. Byrne, Steven G. Manning, James W. Weston and Wayne A. Hochwarter

Research on perceptions of organizational politics has mostly explored the negative aspects and detrimental outcomes for organizations and employees. Responding to recent…

Abstract

Research on perceptions of organizational politics has mostly explored the negative aspects and detrimental outcomes for organizations and employees. Responding to recent calls in the literature for a more balanced treatment, we expand on how positive and negative organizational politics perceptions are perceived as stressors and affect employee outcomes through their influence on the social environment. We propose that employees appraise positive and negative organization politics perceptions as either challenge or hindrance stressors, to which they respond with engagement and disengagement as problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies. Specifically, employees who appraise the negative politics perceptions as a hindrance, use both problem- and emotion-focused coping, which entails one of three strategies: (1) decreasing their engagement, (2) narrowing the focus of their engagement, or (3) disengaging. Although these strategies result in negative outcomes for the organization, employees’ coping leads to their positive well-being. In contrast, employees appraising positive politics perceptions as a challenge stressor use problem-focused coping, which involves increasing their engagement to reap the perceived benefits of a positive political environment. Yet, positive politics perceptions may also be appraised as a hindrance stressor in certain situations, and, therefore lead employees to apply emotion-focused coping wherein they use a disengagement strategy. By disengaging, they deal with the negative effects of politics perceptions, resulting in positive well-being. Thus, our framework suggests an unexpected twist to the stress process of politics perceptions as a strain-provoking component of employee work environments.

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2018

Sugumar Mariappanadar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible consequences of the intra-individual level-based perceptions of participative, supportive and instrumental leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible consequences of the intra-individual level-based perceptions of participative, supportive and instrumental leadership styles and the dissonance factors of leadership styles perceptions on employee engagement using the information-processing and connectionist perspectives of leadership perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses relating to direct and moderated effects of perceptions of leadership styles on employee engagement were tested using a two-stage intra-individual level study (n=172 in each stage). Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings revealed that perceptions of preferred and experienced supportive leadership styles are individually important predictors of employee engagement. It was also revealed that differentiated leadership styles have stronger (complementary) effect on employee engagement when the perceptions of experienced participative and supportive leadership styles were aligned with perceptions of respective preferred leadership styles. Furthermore, it was also found that the low level compared to the high level of dissonance factor or the difference between preferred and experienced instrumental leadership style acted as a complementer on employee engagement.

Research limitations/implications

This study has made contributions to facilitate scholars to build better information-processing models and implicit theories for differentiated leadership and employee engagement links. Finally, the study provides new information on the consequence of perceptions of leadership style and the dissonance factor of leadership perceptions on followers’ actions such as employee engagement.

Originality/value

This will be the first empirical study examining the relationships between the dissonance factor of leadership perceptions of participative, supportive and instrumental styles and employee engagement.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Lucinda L. Parmer and John E. Dillard Jr

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the perceptions employees have regarding how they are treated in the workplace environment by their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the perceptions employees have regarding how they are treated in the workplace environment by their current or most recent supervisor, and how this predicted their feelings of power within themselves. The perceptions were measured utilizing the Managerial Leadership Perceptions Questionnaire (MLPQ) created by Parmer (2017). Employee power was measured utilizing the Power Instrument developed by Hinkin and Schriesheim (1989) which stemmed from French and Raven’s (1959) five original bases of power theory to include referent, expert, legitimate, reward, and coercive.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected a sample of 199 participants gathered from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk digital labor pool. Participants completed a survey which measured their managerial perceptions, bases of power, and demographic characteristics. Statistical analysis was used, including a factor analysis, to explore the relationship between managerial perceptions, bases of power, and demographic characteristics.

Findings

This study demonstrated that there were no significant associations between the demographic associations and personal power. There were significant associations between the demographic associations and position power, managerial perceptions and personal power, managerial perceptions and position power, and managerial leadership style and power.

Research limitations/implications

Five bases of power were examined in this study to include referent, expert (i.e. personal power), legitimate, reward, and coercive (i.e. position power). There is a sixth power now, information power, as noted by Northouse (2016) that needs to be additionally examined. Self-confidence and empowerment feelings were not technically measured quantifiably in this study but were expected feelings based on what mindsets power can produce within a person. Researching these additional feelings of self-confidence and empowerment and how this relates to follower power is needed moving forward in this research area. Finally, ethnic differences need to be measured moving forward.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this study show that employees do embody perceptions and attitudes regarding their current or most recent supervisor based on how they are being treated. This, in turn, can affect their own personal feelings of power within themselves and within the overall organization at large. Careers can be affected, both good and bad, organizational cultures can be impacted by both good and bad, workplace assumptions and norms, as well as, workplace relationships can be affected, both good and bad.

Social implications

The social implications of this study indicated that employeesperceptions and attitudes regarding their immediate supervisor can create positive or negative feelings toward the supervisor which can, in turn, affect the organization’s culture and workplace environment, both good and bad. Working at an organization is within a social environment that needs to be managed and cultivated appropriately for all parties involved.

Originality/value

The majority of the prior research examines leader–follower relationships. No prior research has utilized this particular perception and attitudinal model, the MLPQ developed by Parmer (2017), and the five bases of power model developed by Hinkin and Schriesheim (1989) together in one study. This study explored employee managerial perceptions and their feelings of power within the follower–leader dyadic relationship, as opposed to the leader–follower dyadic relationship which has been more commonly reported within the literature.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Shweta Maheshwari and Veena Vohra

Prior research in the area of organizational change highlights the critical role played by HR practices during organizational change as it may require altering employee

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research in the area of organizational change highlights the critical role played by HR practices during organizational change as it may require altering employee behavior to support the change direction. human resource (HR) function is considered to be well positioned to influence employee behavior by institutionalizing HR practices that support change. Further there is a significant body of literature that suggests that employee behavior is significantly influenced by the perceptions of HR practices during change. HR practices which create positive employee perceptions increase employee commitment to change. The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that identifies critical HR practices that support organizational change and examines their impact on employee perception and commitment to change.

Design/methodology/approach

First, an extensive literature review on organizational change at macro level has been done to identify critical practices desired from key organizational members during organizational change. Second, a case for importance of HR function as a key organizational member during change is presented. Further literature on effectiveness of HR practices adopted by HR professionals during organizational change is examined to find out the gap areas. Third, literature on employee perception and commitment to change is examined to find out possible linkages to HR practices during organizational change. Finally, eight propositions are presented to build an integrated conceptual framework identifying critical HR practices during organizational change and their impact on employee perception and commitment to change.

Findings

The study suggests that HR practices undertaken in the area of culture, leadership, cross functional integration, training, communication and technology if introduced and implemented will positively influence employee perception reducing resistance and increasing commitment to change. Therefore assessing employee perception about critical HR practices at different stages of change initiation, implementation and consolidation can enable understanding about employee commitment to change. This would also help HR professionals understand how effective the HR practices implemented during change have been.

Originality/value

This framework can be used by the researchers and practitioners to study, guide, frame and model empirical research into the area of studying critical HR practices during organizational change. So far literature provides a generic view of desired organizational practices during change. Moreover there are few studies available on employee perception about HR practices implemented during organizational change and its impact on employee commitment to change. The framework presented in this paper would help explore the effectiveness of specific HR practices implemented during change by evaluating its impact on employee perception and commitment to change.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Melinda Laundon, Abby Cathcart and Paula McDonald

Employee reward is central to contemporary debates about work and employment relations; and in the context of ongoing wage stagnation, benefits represent a growing…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee reward is central to contemporary debates about work and employment relations; and in the context of ongoing wage stagnation, benefits represent a growing proportion of total reward value. Past studies have shown that when employees perceive benefits as unfair, this has a negative impact on engagement, performance and retention. Yet no previous studies have explored the components of a benefits system that influence employees’ fairness concerns. Using organisational justice as a theoretical lens, the purpose of this paper is to examine how dimensions of an employee benefits system influence the fairness perceptions of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a qualitative, inductive case study of the benefits system in a large finance and insurance company, drawing on three data sources: interviews with the company’s benefits managers, organisational documents and open-text responses from a benefits survey.

Findings

Three dimensions of the benefits system strongly influenced fairness perceptions – constraints on accessing and utilising benefits; prosocial perceptions about the fairness of benefits to third parties; and the transparency of employee benefits.

Practical implications

The study informs organisations and benefits managers about the important role of supervisors in perceived benefits usability, and how benefits may be managed and communicated to enhance employee fairness perceptions.

Originality/value

This study makes a conceptual contribution to the benefits literature through a detailed exploration of the type of organisational justice judgements that employees make about benefits; and identifying for the first time prosocial fairness concerns about the impact of benefits on third parties.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Paula S. Weber and James E. Weber

This study explored employee trust in management, perceptions of supervisory support for improvement, and perceptions of organizational readiness for change during a…

Abstract

This study explored employee trust in management, perceptions of supervisory support for improvement, and perceptions of organizational readiness for change during a planned organizational change effort. Employee data were gathered at two time periods six months apart. Time 1 data were collected just prior to the start of a major change initiative. Time 2 data were collected six months after the change was initiated. Results show a significant increase in supervisory support for improvement and perceptions of organizational readiness for change from time 1 to time 2. Findings also suggest that differences in perceptions of supervisory support for improvement and organizational readiness for change along with trust in management were moderated by goal clarity, employee participation, autonomy, and feedback. Practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Erhan Boğan and Bekir Bora Dedeoğlu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of employees’ self-experienced social responsibility perceptions in the relationship between employees

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating role of employees’ self-experienced social responsibility perceptions in the relationship between employees’ community- and environment-oriented social responsibility perceptions and trust in an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The corporate social responsibility (CSR) construct is examined in the context of stakeholders including the community, environment and employees. The study was carried out with 438 questionnaires gathered from four- and five-star hotels operating in Alanya, Turkey. The proposed model was tested with the partial least squares method of structural equation modeling. Multiple group analysis was performed to test the moderating effect.

Findings

Findings reveal that employees’ community- and environment-oriented social responsibility perceptions have a positive effect on trust in the organization. Based on the results of multigroup analysis, the effect of employees’ community-oriented social responsibility perceptions on trust in the organization was determined to be more prominent in the group of employees with high self-experienced social responsibility perceptions. However, the same moderating effect could not be determined in relation to environment-oriented social responsibility perceptions and trust in the organization.

Originality/value

Studies focusing on CSR activities were mainly examined at the macro level. Internal stakeholders’ returns to these activities were not sufficiently considered. Contrary to previous studies that examine the link between CSR perceptions measured with Carroll’s pyramid dimensions and organizational trust, the current study examined CSR perceptions with the stakeholder approach. Moreover, the study discovered one of the variables defined as the black box that differentiates the returns that employees provide to CSR activities.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Khawaja Jehanzeb

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between perception of training, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior. Moreover, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between perception of training, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior. Moreover, the study examines the moderating role of power distance on the relationship between perception of training and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using stratified sampling technique, the data were obtained from 379 employees working at branches of public and private banks located in five metropolitan cities in Pakistan. To test the established hypotheses, structural equation modeling technique was adopted using Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS) 21.0.

Findings

The findings stated a significant relationship between perception of training and organizational citizenship behavior, but there was no relationship found between perception of training and organizational commitment. Moreover, organizational commitment partly mediated the relationship between perception of training and organizational citizenship behavior. The results also described that power distance moderates the relationship between perception of training and organizational commitment.

Practical implications

The results of the study can be beneficial for banking sector and strategy makers who have extended vision and anticipate organizational citizenship behavior from their employees. The study also offers the scope and space for the prospective researchers and scholars to carry out further research.

Originality/value

There is extensive literature available on the relationship between perception of training, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior. However, it is observed that very few studies took the opportunity to examine the moderating role of power distance on the relationship between perception of training and organizational commitment, particularly in the context of Pakistan. Therefore, this study can be considered as original and have a great value in understanding the developed relationships in the scenario of Pakistan.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 68000