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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Rebecca A. Thacker and Kelly B. Holl

The purpose of this paper is to identify behaviorally‐based training for management trainees with a foundation in employees' beliefs about effective managerial behaviors

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify behaviorally‐based training for management trainees with a foundation in employees' beliefs about effective managerial behaviors, and the relationship of these behaviors to employees' satisfaction with supervision, company as employer, and job assignments.

Design/methodology/approach

Manufacturing organization and social services agency employees (N=134) were surveyed by questionnaire and asked “How important do you think it is that managers exhibit the following behaviors?” and “How well does your manager exhibit the following behaviors?” Factor analysis produced three factors: Connection with employees, Vision, Autonomy. Employee satisfaction questions were included.

Findings

Vision and Autonomy scales for “How well does your manager exhibit the following behaviors?” showed significant, positive correlations for satisfaction with quality of supervision, and with company/agency as an employer. Connection with employees scale for “How important do you think it is that managers exhibit the following behaviors?” showed significant, positive correlations for employees' satisfaction with job assignments

Research limitations/implications

Future research should include employees' perceptions of what constitutes effective managerial behaviors. Study should be replicated in larger, multicultural organizations to assess the universality of these managerial behaviors.

Practical implications

Specific recommendations for behaviorally‐based manager training of management trainees, based on employee‐identified behaviors, are provided.

Originality/value

The paper is creative in its inclusion of employees in data collection of definition of effective managerial behaviors and is valuable to those interested in management trainee programs linking behaviorally‐based development to employee satisfaction outcomes.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2023

Azadeh Shafaei and Mehran Nejati

This study examines the relationship between green human resource management (green HRM) and employee innovative behaviour. It also investigates the mediating role of job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between green human resource management (green HRM) and employee innovative behaviour. It also investigates the mediating role of job satisfaction to explore the mechanism through which green HRM is related to employee innovative behaviour. Additionally, it examines the moderating role of inclusive leadership to determine the boundary condition of the relationship between green HRM and employee innovative behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a quantitative research approach using survey and collected 508 responses from full-time employees in Australia.

Findings

The authors have found support for all the hypothesised relationships in the study. Specifically, green HRM is positively related to employee innovative behaviour. This relationship is mediated by job satisfaction and accentuated by inclusive leadership.

Originality/value

Green HRM promotes a green atmosphere in which employees can contribute to a safer and healthier environment. Despite the increasing attention to green HRM in the management literature, little is known about the mechanisms and boundary conditions explaining employees' responses to green HRM.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2023

Muhammad Asim, Zhiying Liu, Muhammad Athar Nadeem, Usman Ghani, Junaid Khalid and Yi Xu

This study, based on the conservation of resource theory, aims to investigate the negative impacts of abusive supervision on helping behaviors among employees by examining…

Abstract

Purpose

This study, based on the conservation of resource theory, aims to investigate the negative impacts of abusive supervision on helping behaviors among employees by examining the mediating role of rumination and the moderating role of psychological flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

A total sample of 282 reliable questionnaires are collected from 282 employees working in education and banking sectors of Pakistan. SPSS and AMOS are used for data analysis of the proposed model.

Findings

The findings reveal that rumination mediates the relationship between abusive supervision and employees’ helping behavior. In addition, the results show that higher levels of psychological flexibility negatively moderate the relationship between abusive supervision and employees’ helping behaviors through mediation.

Practical implications

This study elucidates how and when abusive supervision deters helping behavior among employees and provides useful guidelines for banking/university’s administration to understand harmful consequences of abusive supervision and take appropriate policy measures to lessen their harmful effects upon employees.

Originality/value

By proposing a moderated mediation model, this study discovers rumination as a key mediator that links abusive supervision to employees’ helping behaviors and identifies the role of psychological flexibility in diminishing the negative impacts of abusive supervision upon employees’ helping behaviors through rumination.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Paul Lyons and Randall Paul Bandura

The purposes of this paper are to: help managers and other practitioners learn about voluntary, helpful employee behavior; provide examples of how such behavior is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are to: help managers and other practitioners learn about voluntary, helpful employee behavior; provide examples of how such behavior is manifest in everyday work situations, and demonstrate how to assess the behavior for recruitment and selection. A brief study is presented that demonstrates how valid and reliable measures may be used to identify employee predisposition for voluntary, helpful behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Two substantive components of this work are: a detailed literature review that describes and demonstrates the elements of voluntary, helpful behavior (v-hob); and a report of a brief correlational study that demonstrates how two short surveys may help in predicting employee voluntary, helpful behavior.

Findings

Literature review reveals that v-hob is related to many positive employee outcomes among which are better work performance, more positive relationships with co-workers and managers, and lower turnover, as contrasted with employees-in-general. The study undertaken reveals two measures: job dedication, and contextual performance are valuable in predicting employee v-hob.

Research limitations/implications

In the survey portion of this paper the sample size is relatively small yet amenable for statistical analysis. Study participants are representative of a single academic discipline and are representative of the same university. The two survey tools used have repeatedly been shown to have validity and reliability.

Practical implications

This paper offers a detailed view of employee helpful behavior and it helps managers develop ways to assess one ' s proclivity for the behavior.

Originality/value

This paper helps managers, HR specialists and others attain knowledge on the expression of employee v-hob. Two survey tools are provided to help identify employees who may be predisposed to offer this desirable behavior.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2023

Peixu He, Amitabh Anand, Mengying Wu, Cuiling Jiang and Qing Xia

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how voluntary citizenship behaviour towards an individual (VCB-I) is linked with vicious knowledge hiding (VKH), and why…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how voluntary citizenship behaviour towards an individual (VCB-I) is linked with vicious knowledge hiding (VKH), and why members, within a mastery climate, tend to participate in less VKH after their engaging in VCB-I. The authors, according to the moral licensing theory, propose that moral licensing mediates the relationship between VCB-I and VKH, and that a mastery climate weakens the hypothesised link via moral licensing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveys 455 valid matching samples of subordinates and supervisors from 77 working teams in China at two time points and explores the relationship between VCB and VKH, as well as the underlying mechanism. A confirmatory factor analysis, bootstrapping method and hierarchical linear model were used to validate the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that VCB-I has a significant positive effect on VKH; moral credentials play a mediating role in the relationship between VCB-I and VKH; and the mastery climate moderates the positive effect of moral credentials on VKH and the mediating effect of moral credentials. In a high-mastery climate, the direct effect of moral credentials on VKH and the indirect influence of VCB-I on VKH through moral credentials are both weakened, and conversely, both effects are enhanced in a low-mastery climate. However, contrary to the expected hypothesis, moral credits do not mediate the relationship between VCB-I and VKH, which may be due to the differences in the mechanisms between the two moral licensing models.

Originality/value

Prior research has mainly focused on the “victim-centric” perspective to examine the impacts of others’ behaviour on employees’ knowledge hiding. Few works have used the “actor-centric” perspective to analyse the relationship between employees’ prior workplace behaviour and their subsequent knowledge hiding intention. In addition, this study enriches the field research on the voluntary aspects of organisational citizenship behaviour, which differs from its involuntary ones.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2022

Liling Cai, Zengrui Xiao and Xiaofen Ji

Drawing on social cognitive theory, this study aims to examine the relationship between supervisor developmental feedback and employee innovative behavior, incorporating…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social cognitive theory, this study aims to examine the relationship between supervisor developmental feedback and employee innovative behavior, incorporating with the mediating role of psychological safety and the moderating role of face orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in 15 manufacturing companies in China. The participants comprised 302 employees. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. The mediating effects and the moderated mediating effects are further examined with bias-corrected bootstrapping method.

Findings

Supervisor developmental feedback has a positive effect on employee innovative behavior through psychological safety, and this mediating effect is weakened by protective face orientation (fear of losing face), while the moderating effect of acquisitive face orientation (desire to gain face) is not significant.

Practical implications

Organizations should create a development-oriented and safe innovation atmosphere for employees. In addition, leaders should adopt differentiated feedback and communication methods according to subordinates' face orientation.

Originality/value

The study has demonstrated the positive effect of supervisor developmental feedback on employee innovative behavior, which is different from previous studies on performance feedback and leadership types. Meanwhile, this study has also explored the mediating effect of psychological safety and the moderating effect of face orientation, which provides more insights on the mechanism and boundary conditions of the effect of supervisor developmental feedback.

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2022

Zahra Ahmadi Alvar, Davood Feiz and Meysam Modarresi

This study aims to reach a perception of the advance of research on deviant organisational behaviours.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reach a perception of the advance of research on deviant organisational behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has been done through the text mining method. By reviewing, the papers were selected 360 papers between 1984 and 2020. Based on the Davis–Boldin index, 11 optimal clusters were gained. Then the roots were ranked in any group, using the Simple Additive Weighting technique. Data were analysed by RapidMiner and MATLAB software.

Findings

According to the results obtained, clusters are included leadership styles, job attitudes, spirituality in the workplace, work psychology, personality characteristics, classification and management of deviant workplace behaviours, service and customer orientation, deviation in sales, psychological contracts, group dynamics and inappropriate supervision.

Originality/value

This study provides a landscape and roadmap for future investigation on deviant organisational behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2022

Zhang Zheng and Rahil Irfan Ahmed

This paper examined the mediating role of boundary spanning behavior and the moderating effects of traditionality linking humble leadership and employee creative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examined the mediating role of boundary spanning behavior and the moderating effects of traditionality linking humble leadership and employee creative performance from the perspective of Social Exchange Theory (SET) to reveal the behavioral mechanism and boundary condition regarding the influence of humble leadership on creative performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 276 employees and the supervisors from 8 companies in China was taken using two-wave data.

Findings

The results indicated that humble leadership was positively related to employee creative performance, and boundary spanning behavior partially mediated the relationship between humble leadership and employee creative performance. Traditionality strengthens the mediation process when traditionality is high.

Practical implications

These findings provide several theoretical and practical implications for the domains of humble leadership and boundary spanning behavior. For example, human resource (HR) departments can recruit leaders with high humility and cultivate team leaders through systematic training programs about self-awareness, openness and self-transcendence; team leaders should encourage employees to participate in boundary spanning activities and hiring managers select employees with high traditionality to synergize with leader humility.

Originality/value

Based on the SET, this paper explored the behavioral mechanism between humble leadership and creative performance and enriched the prior research, which is from the cognitive or emotional view, and further answered the question “what are the employees' behavioral responses when they confront the humble leadership”.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Erik Poutsma, Coen van Eert and Paul E. M. Ligthart

This paper investigated the effect of employee share ownership, mediated through psychological ownership, on organizational citizenship behavior. The analysis included the…

Abstract

This paper investigated the effect of employee share ownership, mediated through psychological ownership, on organizational citizenship behavior. The analysis included the possible complementary role of High Performance Ownership systems. This paper investigated these relationships by analyzing employee survey data from a Dutch organization that has implemented employee share ownership. We used PLS, a variance-based structural equation model to test the hypotheses. The results showed a direct influence of employee ownership on organizational citizenship behavior, but the relationship was not mediated by psychological ownership. Unexpectedly, the results show that a High Performance Work System bundle without employee ownership generates psychological ownership, but this does not influence organizational citizenship behavior. This research could not confirm the comprehensive model in which employee ownership, HRM system, and psychological ownership are positively related to each other. We choose a deliberate set of HR practices on theoretical grounds, but future research could investigate other sets of HR practices that may produce the expected effects. This research showed that employee ownership has a positive influence on organizational citizenship behavior. Organizations are therefore advised to consider implementing employee ownership. The results also show that a set of HR practices positively influences psychological ownership. The results suggest that organizations should strive for a consistent message, which makes the employees feel that they are taken serious as and deserve to be owners. We analyzed the influence of a configuration of high performance ownership system on psychological ownership and organizational citizenship behavior that is not done before.

Details

Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory & Labor-Managed Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-379-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2013

Krista Jaakson, Jaan Masso and Maaja Vadi

Purpose — This chapter is aimed at testing the strength of three different drivers to engage in dishonest behavior at work — financial gain, response to injustice, and…

Abstract

Purpose — This chapter is aimed at testing the strength of three different drivers to engage in dishonest behavior at work — financial gain, response to injustice, and escape from boredom — and shedding light to the power of individual and organizational values to hold down the effect of these drivers.Design/methodology/approach — We analyze the data of 167 service employees from a large retail organization, who responded to questionnaires which manipulated drivers and organizational values.Findings — As a result we find that the financial and injustice drivers are effectively triggering several dishonest behaviors, whereas — contrary to the expectations — boredom at work does not threaten employers with employee engagement in dishonest behavior. We do find weak moderating effect of individual values in reacting to the drivers for some forms of dishonest behaviors, but the role of organizational values was marginal.Originality/value — In this chapter dishonest behavior is divided into nine specific dishonest acts involving management and customers as the stakeholders whose interests are at stake. We attempt to associate these behaviors with particular drivers. We also look at the moderators in this process: individual and organizational values. To date, espoused values of the organization is an underexplored organizational instrument compared to other situational variables, for instance, the existence of codes of ethics.

Details

(Dis)Honesty in Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-602-6

Keywords

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