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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Shih Yung Chou and Erlinda Lopez-Rodriguez

The purpose of this study is twofold. First, we explore the relationship between organizational justice and service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (SOCB). In…

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1761

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold. First, we explore the relationship between organizational justice and service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (SOCB). In particular, we focus on perceived distributive and procedural justice. Second, we examine the moderating effect of the need for achievement and need for affiliation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed an online cross-sectional survey approach and distributed questionnaires to service employees at a large service organization. Data were analyzed with a two-step structural equation modeling technique using LISREL 8.7.

Findings

Perceived procedural justice significantly predicts SOCB. Additionally, the need for affiliation positively moderates the relationship between perceived procedural justice and SOCB, whereas the need for achievement positively moderates the relationship between perceived distributive justice and SOCB.

Practical implications

Results confirm the importance of establishing and implementing transparent formal organizational processes and procedures for evaluating outcomes of service employees. We recommend service organizations to communicate proactively with employees about how formal organizational systems are implemented, and provide employees with examples and cases that illustrate how performance appraisals are performed. Moreover, supervisors in service organizations need to establish and maintain high quality of social exchange relationships with employees by providing personal coaching and counseling. Furthermore, service organizations need to establish a positive and friendly performance appraisal environment and offer trainings on how to satisfy unpredictable customer demand to employees.

Originality/value

Given the growth of commercial services in the USA and the limited existing knowledge on SOCB, this study provides scholars and practitioner with suggestions and recommendations on how SOCB can be encouraged in service settings.

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Kerstin A. Aumann and Cheri Ostroff

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular…

Abstract

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being paid to the appropriateness of various human resources management (HRM) practices because practices that may be effective within one cultural context may not be effective in other cultural contexts. This chapter argues that a multi-level perspective is needed to explain the interplay between HRM practices and employee responses across cultural contexts. Specifically, the multi-level framework developed in this chapter elucidates the importance of fit between HRM practices, individual values, organizational values, and societal values. Societal values play a key role in the adoption of HRM practices, and the effectiveness of these HRM practices will depend largely on “fit” or alignment with the values of the societal culture in which the organization is operating. HRM practices also shape the collective responses of employees through organizational climate at the organizational level and through psychological climate at the individual level. For positive employee attitudes and responses to emerge, the climate created by the HRM practices must be aligned with societal and individual values. Building on these notions, the strength of the societal culture in which the organization is operating serves as a mechanism that links relationships between climate, value fit, and attitudes across levels of analysis. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for future research and implications for practice.

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Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

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In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

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Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Shih Yung Chou, Tree Chang and Bo Han

The purpose of this paper is to explore how perceived visible, work value, and informational dissimilarity affect an individual's helping behavior. Additionally, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how perceived visible, work value, and informational dissimilarity affect an individual's helping behavior. Additionally, it investigates the moderating roles of the need for affiliation and need for achievement.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical analysis was performed.

Findings

It is proposed that perceived visible, work value, and informational dissimilarity will have a negative impact on an individual's helping behavior. Additionally, it is posited that the need for affiliation and need for achievement will positively moderate the negative relationship between perceived dissimilarity and helping behavior.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides additional insight into antecedents of helping behavior, and offers a theoretical basis for future research that examines the relationship between subjective diversity and discretionary behaviors in organizations.

Practical implications

This paper has several important implications. First, managers are recommended to implement effective educational approaches, such as role-playing, that help eliminate employees’ negative perceptions of dissimilarity and promote willingness to help co-workers. Second, managers should reinforce shared vision, values, and goals, which in turn may encourage interpersonal cooperative behaviors. Third, managers should facilitate the dissemination of knowledge and information that are crucial to individual performance. Fourth, managers are encouraged to provide employees with trainings on effective interpersonal processes such as inclusion and emotional management. Finally, managers should increase the degree of task interdependence, which may promote high levels of helping behavior.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the very few studies that link helping behavior with subjective perceptions of dissimilarity. More importantly, this paper highlights the importance of the interaction between dissimilarity perceptions and internal driving forces.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2020

Radityo Putro Handrito, Hendrik Slabbinck and Johanna Vanderstraeten

This study aims to explore how an entrepreneur's implicit need for achievement and risk reception contribute to internationalization performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how an entrepreneur's implicit need for achievement and risk reception contribute to internationalization performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involves 176 Indonesian entrepreneurs. The authors use the Operant Motive Test to assess the entrepreneur's implicit needs and apply hierarchical Tobit regression to assess the interplay between implicit need for achievement, risk perception and internationalization.

Findings

The authors show that an entrepreneur's basic needs and risk perception play an essential role in SME internationalization. More specifically, the authors reveal a positive association between the entrepreneur's need for achievement and small and medium enterprises (SME) internationalization. They also show a U-shaped relationship for the moderation effect of risk perception on this relationship. That is, for a high need for achievement-motivated entrepreneur, the level of internationalization is at the highest when risk perception is either very low or very high.

Originality/value

In this study, the authors argue that analyses at the entrepreneur's individual level are indispensable to better understand firm internationalization. The authors argue that the role of psycho-cognitive characteristics of individuals (such as motivational dispositions) received too little attention, compared to factors at the firm or environmental level. This study examines such personality aspects and finds that implicit need for achievement and risk perception impact SME internationalization.

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Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Tanyu Zhang, Gayle C. Avery, Harald Bergsteiner and Elizabeth More

This study aims to, given that most research focusses on leaders and ignores the influence of follower characteristics on either leadership or engagement, investigate…

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1858

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to, given that most research focusses on leaders and ignores the influence of follower characteristics on either leadership or engagement, investigate whether employee characteristics moderate the relationship between perceived leadership styles and employee engagement. Recent research has shown that visionary and organic leadership paradigms positively influence employee engagement, compared with classical and transactional leadership environments (Zhang et al., 2014).

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data from 432 sales assistants, collected from retail shopping malls in Sydney, Australia, were analyzed.

Findings

Structured regression analysis confirmed that the employee characteristics of need for achievement, equity sensitivity and need for clarity moderate the relationship between four leadership paradigms and employee engagement. The nature of the moderation varies in complex ways.

Research limitations/implications

There is scope to confirm this study in different contexts, to include additional employee characteristics and reconfirm some scales and to remove common method variance.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that to improve employee engagement: employers should recruit staff exhibiting characteristics predicted to generate high employee engagement; organizations should develop supervisors to ensure that they adopt leadership styles found to drive employee engagement; and recruiters should consider matching the characteristics of employees to the prevailing leadership paradigm(s) in the organization.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a major gap in the literature by examining the moderating effects of follower characteristics on different leadership paradigms and employee engagement.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Shane Connelly and Brett S. Torrence

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span…

Abstract

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span of research on emotions in the workplace encompasses a wide variety of affective variables such as emotional climate, emotional labor, emotion regulation, positive and negative affect, empathy, and more recently, specific emotions. Emotions operate in complex ways across multiple levels of analysis (i.e., within-person, between-person, interpersonal, group, and organizational) to exert influence on work behavior and outcomes, but their linkages to human resource management (HRM) policies and practices have not always been explicit or well understood. This chapter offers a review and integration of the bourgeoning research on discrete positive and negative emotions, offering insights about why these emotions are relevant to HRM policies and practices. We review some of the dominant theories that have emerged out of functionalist perspectives on emotions, connecting these to a strategic HRM framework. We then define and describe four discrete positive and negative emotions (fear, pride, guilt, and interest) highlighting how they relate to five HRM practices: (1) selection, (2) training/learning, (3) performance management, (4) incentives/rewards, and (5) employee voice. Following this, we discuss the emotion perception and regulation implications of these and other discrete emotions for leaders and HRM managers. We conclude with some challenges associated with understanding discrete emotions in organizations as well as some opportunities and future directions for improving our appreciation and understanding of the role of discrete emotional experiences in HRM.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Olebogeng Glad Dibetso, Margaret Mary Sutherland and Caren Brenda Scheepers

The purpose of this study is to empirically quantify the factors that are perceived to drive or inhibit performance of information technology (IT) outsourced employees

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically quantify the factors that are perceived to drive or inhibit performance of information technology (IT) outsourced employees from a range of information technology outsourcing (ITO) stakeholders in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The first phase was a qualitative study on 19 stakeholders focussed on the development of the constructs. The second phase was quantitative, with a sample of 116 ITO stakeholders of the largest IT company in South Africa.

Findings

The study revealed that the ITO stakeholders had misaligned perceptions on inhibitors and somewhat congruent perceptions with regards to drivers of performance. Managers and poor performers’ perceptions of inhibiting factors of performance were significantly different. The empirical evidence showed that the key drivers of performance were intrinsic factors and leadership, whilst the inhibiting factors were mainly related to poor leadership.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation was that the population was represented by one large organisation in the South African IT industry and its clients, thereby excluding the rest of the IT industry participants, specifically the medium and small IT companies. The quota sample resulted in a non-probability study, and thus, the results of this study may not necessarily be generalised to other populations. This study’s findings on differences between good and poor performers must be investigated in other industries.

Practical implications

For outsourced employees to perform optimally, some key intrinsic factors must be fulfilled. Passion and pride, aligned to a meaningful job role, will unleash outstanding performance. Organisations need to ensure that there is regular feedback to managers on their performance and subsequent leadership development. Alignment of managers and poor performers’ perceptions on drivers and inhibitors could improve performance.

Social implications

These findings demonstrate the large gap in perceptions about the key drivers and inhibiters of performance.

Originality/value

The study reveals that top performers tend to have higher order and intrinsic motivators, compared to poor performers, who have a mixture of extrinsic and intrinsic needs, and managers have a misaligned expectation of extrinsic motivators.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Frank Fitzpatrick

Abstract

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Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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