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Article

Suresh Cuganesan and Clinton Free

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system (MCS) changes that were new public management (NPM) inspired.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a longitudinal case study of a large Australian state police department utilizing an abductive research design.

Findings

The authors found that identification processes strongly conditioned the reception of the MCS changes introduced. Initially, the authors observed mixed interpretations of controls as both enabling and coercive. Over time, these changes were seen to be coercive because they threatened interpersonal relationships and the importance and efficacy of squads in combating serious and organized crime.

Research limitations/implications

The authors contributed to MCSs literature by revealing the critical role that multifaceted relational and collective identification processes played in shaping interpretations of controls as enabling–coercive. The authors build on this to elaborate on the notion of employees’ centricity in the MCS design.

Practical implications

This study suggests that, in complex organizational settings, the MCS design and change should reckon with pre-existing patterns of employeesidentification.

Originality/value

The authors suggested shifting the starting point for contemplating the MCS change: from looking at how what employees do is controlled to how the change impacts and how employees feel about who they are. When applied to the MCS design, employee centricity highlights the value of collaborative co-design, attentiveness to relational identification between employees, feedback and interaction in place of inferred management expectations and traditional mechanistic approaches.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Zoltán Krajcsák

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how employee commitment and identification affect the intra-group conflicts and to demonstrate the moderator role of some…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how employee commitment and identification affect the intra-group conflicts and to demonstrate the moderator role of some dimensions of core self-evaluation (CSE) on the relationship between commitment and conflict. Exploring relationships can provide a better understanding of the nature of intra-group conflicts and the development of prevention and conflict management strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses case studies to illustrate the factors that amplify and weaken conflicts. Case studies describe conflicts within a single multinational company.

Findings

According to the results, the high levels of affective commitment and the degree of group identification reduce the relationship conflict, and the impact of affective commitment on the relationship conflict is moderated by the degree of self-esteem. The high levels of normative commitment and the degree of organizational identification reduce the process conflict, and the impact of normative commitment on process conflict is moderated by the degree of self-control. The high levels of professional commitment and the degree of occupational identification reduce the task conflict and that the impact of professional commitment on the task conflict is moderated by the degree of self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

The results should also be confirmed by research using a quantitative method.

Practical implications

Managers need to increase employees’ commitment in a targeted way to increase their performance and to prevent conflicts. An important lesson for recruitment professionals is that in jobs where conflict prevention is particularly important, CSE levels that determine personality traits should also be tested.

Originality/value

The degree of commitment and identification also largely depends on organizational circumstances and the support of the manager. The factors brought into play by the employees, including the personality of the staff involved in the conflict, also play a role in conflicts. While these do not trigger it, some personality variables influence the outcome of conflicts. The study demonstrates that targeted enhancement of employee commitment and identification can address intra-group conflicts and that CSE is able to prevent certain types of intra-group conflicts through its moderating effect.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article

Michele N. Medina-Craven, Danielle Cooper, Christopher Penney and Miguel P. Caldas

This paper aims to understand the factors that influence employee organizational identification in family firms, and through identification, the willingness to engage in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the factors that influence employee organizational identification in family firms, and through identification, the willingness to engage in citizenship behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the stewardship theory, the authors develop a model to test the relationships between family relatedness and relational identification to the family firm owner, employee-focused stewardship practices, organizational identification and organizational citizenship behaviors. The authors test the hypotheses using regression and the Preacher and Hayes PROCESS macro on a sample of 292 family firm employees.

Findings

The findings suggest that both relational identification with the family firm owner and employee-focused stewardship practices positively influence organizational identification, and that familial ties to the family firm owner can influence relationships with citizenship behaviors for non-family employees.

Originality/value

The authors build on existing literature to investigate how employees identify themselves within a family firm and how stewardship practices from the employee's perspective (rather than managers' or founders' perspectives) can influence organizational identification and citizenship behaviors.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article

Yi-Ying Chang, Che-Yuan Chang, Chung-Wen Chen, Y.C.K. Chen and Shu-Ying Chang

The purpose of this paper is to examine if personal identification could explicate the black box between participative leadership and employee ambidexterity. Also, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if personal identification could explicate the black box between participative leadership and employee ambidexterity. Also, the authors aim to explore how and why the top-down effects of higher-level leadership styles affect lower-level outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected multilevel and multisource data from top manager teams, and unit managers and employees of research and development, marketing and sales, and operations from Taiwanese technology firms.

Findings

The results revealed that individual-level personal identification partially mediated the relationship between firm-level participative leadership and individual-level employee ambidexterity, and individual-level coworker social support moderated the effect of firm-level participative leadership on individual-level employee ambidexterity through individual-level personal identification.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrated the importance of participative leadership and personal identification. It contributed to profound comprehension for potential mechanisms of individual-level personal identification and an enhancer of individual-level coworker social support why and how affects firm-level participative leadership on individual-level employee ambidexterity.

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Article

Jin Yang, Cuiping Ma, Jibao Gu and Hefu Liu

This paper aims to put forth a model that accounts for the effect of servant leadership on employee creativity from a social identity perspective. Specifically, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to put forth a model that accounts for the effect of servant leadership on employee creativity from a social identity perspective. Specifically, this paper aims to examine team identification as the mediating mechanism by which servant leadership influence employee creativity. This paper also intends to investigate the moderating influences of horizontal and vertical collectivism on the effectiveness of servant leadership on follower team identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Servant leadership, team identification, collectivism (consisted of horizontal and vertical collectivism) and employee creativity were assessed in an empirical study based on a sample of 451 employees from 11 banks in China.

Findings

Drawing on social identity theory, this study found that follower team identification partially mediates the relationship between servant leadership and employee creativity. In addition, results showed that horizontal collectivism moderates the relationship between servant leadership and follower team identification; the relationship was more positive when horizontal collectivism was high, rather than low; vertical collectivism also moderates the relationship between servant leadership and follower team identification; the relationship was more positive when vertical collectivism was low, rather than high. However, results of this study indicated that the moderated mediation effects of team identification on the relationship between servant leadership and employee creativity are nonsignificant.

Practical implications

First, this research affirmed the need to promote servant leadership in employment settings. Second, managers’ understandings of the instrumental role of servant leadership in showing interpersonal acceptance, offering encouragement and support and expressing trust would prove to be valuable because it could enhance employee creativity. Finally, the findings from this study should help managers gain a better understanding of the contextual factors.

Originality/value

The first contribution of the current study was to identify team identification as an important psychological process that can link servant leadership to employee creativity. Another important contribution of the current research was the identification of the boundary conditions (e.g. horizontal and vertical collectivism).

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article

Jie Li, Qiaozhuan Liang, Zhenzhen Zhang and Xiao Wang

The purpose of this paper is to find how leader humility affects employees’ constructive voice behavior toward supervisor (speaking up) and coworkers (speaking out) from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find how leader humility affects employees’ constructive voice behavior toward supervisor (speaking up) and coworkers (speaking out) from an identification-based perspective, and seeks to verify the effectiveness of leader humility in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 325 employees in four Chinese companies with two phases. In the first phase, the participants were asked to report the leader humility, their identification of their relations with the supervisor, and their identification with their organization. In the second phase, they were asked to report their voice behaviors toward their supervisors and coworkers.

Findings

The results indicate that leader humility strongly predicts both employees’ voice behaviors of speaking up and speaking out. Results further suggest that relational identification with the supervisor explains why leader humility promotes employees speaking up, while organizational identification explains why leader humility promotes employees speaking up and speaking out.

Practical implications

Managers with humility can successfully shape employees’ relational and organizational identifications, which in turn encourage their voice behaviors toward supervisors and coworkers. Hence, behaving humbly in working places could be an effective way for managers to promote organizational cohesion and creativity.

Originality/value

Although leader humility attracts much attention in both academia and practice, researchers have been primarily focusing on conceptual development and measurement issues, and empirical studies are rare. This is the first research connecting leader humility and employee proactive behaviors. Moreover, it takes an in-depth analysis of the constructive voice behaviors by differentiating them based on their targets.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Maimunah Ismail and Nordahlia Umar Baki

This paper aims to examine the influence of two organizational factors, namely, organizational justice and organizational culture, on organizational identification as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of two organizational factors, namely, organizational justice and organizational culture, on organizational identification as perceived by employees following merger and acquisition (M&A) in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study, which adopts the Social Identity Theory as its theoretical foundation, was conducted among employees from selected Malaysian organizations that had undergone M&A from 2009 to 2016. Data were obtained from 302 respondents and analysed using Structural Equation Modelling procedures.

Findings

The results reveal that interactional justice and four dimensions of organizational culture contribute significantly to organizational identification, with a determination power of 61 per cent.

Practical implications

The study offers practical insights to human resource managers in strengthening organizational identification as perceived by employees after an M&A by considering the crucial role of interactional justice and organizational culture.

Originality/value

There have been few investigations that link employees’ perceptions of organizational justice and culture with post-merger organizational identity. This study theorizes on human issues in M&A and enriches the Western literature on organizational identification by providing insights from an Asian (Malaysian) perspective.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited in terms of respondents who were employed in M&A organizations in the Klang Valley areas in Malaysia. The scope is also limited to an examination of two groups of organizational factors, namely, justice and culture, that lead to organizational identification. Implications to managing human resources from the perspective of organizational development are discussed.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Esra Memili and Dianne H.B. Welsh

Since non‐family employees form a large portion of employees in many family firms and they play an important role in the transgenerational survival of those firms, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Since non‐family employees form a large portion of employees in many family firms and they play an important role in the transgenerational survival of those firms, the purpose of this paper is to explore how family influence factors affect non‐family employees' organizational identification and then organizational attachment, which can consequently influence their turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this conceptual paper, the paper attempts to answer two important research questions: What are the family firm‐specific determinants of nonfamily employees' organizational identification in family firms? How does nonfamily employees' organizational identification affect their tenure in family firms? Thereby, the paper develops a conceptual model linking family influence dimensions (i.e. power, experience, and culture), nonfamily employees' organizational identification, organizational attachment, and turnover intentions within the domain of the stewardship theory.

Findings

The model presented in this paper can help scholars and family business managers better understand the idiosyncratic family influence dimensions that can affect nonfamily employees' perceptions and intentions associated with their tenure in family firms. If family firms can limit the negative effects of family influence factors, make the best use of the positive effects, and integrate key nonfamily employees into the family firm through helping them satisfy their higher‐order needs, they can uninterruptedly move forward toward achieving long‐term competitive advantages and superior performance.

Research limitations/implications

Aside from the antecedents of nonfamily employees' organizational identification that are pointed out in this paper, there may be other determinants that are beyond the scope of this paper. The governance structure and strategic orientations are some of the possibilities constituting avenues for future research.

Social implications

Family firms with great employee care cannot only increase employees' loyalty to their firms, but also help them develop work‐life balance.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the only attempts to use social identity theory to explain non‐family employees' organizational identification and attachment in family firms that can affect their turnover intentions. Not only does this add to our knowledge of family firm human resources management and provide new directions for future research, but it also suggests the usefulness of social identity theory in family business research.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

Keywords

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Article

Lifang Zhao, Jiman Lee and Sungok Moon

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception and their organizational identification in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception and their organizational identification in a Chinese context. The moderating effect of employees’ collectivist orientation on the relationship between CSR perception and organizational identification is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 308 employees of 7 firms in Zhejiang Province, located in southeast China. Hierarchical regression analyses were utilized to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that all three dimensions of CSR perception in this study, specifically, economic, philanthropic and strategic CSR perception, are strongly and positively related to the organizational identification of employees. Employees’ collectivist orientation positively influences the relationship between strategic CSR perception and organizational identification. In contrast, collectivist orientation negatively influences the relationship between economic CSR perception and organizational identification. However, no moderating effect of collectivism on the relationship between philanthropic CSR perception and organizational identification was found.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the positive relationship between employees’ CSR perception and their workplace attitudes, shedding particular light on how employees’ personal values influence their responses to CSR in Chinese organizations.

Originality/value

This study extends the current understanding on the relationship between CSR and organizational identification. Particularly, the authors include multiple dimensions of CSR (economic, philanthropic and strategic CSR) in the research model, demonstrating that the link between CSR perception and organizational identification is influenced by employees’ collectivist orientation.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article

Irene Tsachouridi and Irene Nikandrou

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effect of perceived organizational virtuousness (POV) on organizational spontaneity. The assumed indirect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effect of perceived organizational virtuousness (POV) on organizational spontaneity. The assumed indirect effect is investigated through the social identity perspective. As such, organizational identification, pride and respect are examined as mediators of the POV-spontaneity relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses the authors conducted two studies. First, the authors conducted an experimental study with 136 participants in which the authors investigated the role of organizational identification as mediator of the examined relationship. Second, the authors conducted a field study in which 572 employees working in various organizations participated. In this study, pride and respect were incorporated as first-step mediators explaining serially (indirectly) the relationship between the independent and the dependent variable through organizational identification.

Findings

The findings of the experimental study indicate that organizational identification mediates the positive relationship between POV and organizational spontaneity. The results of the field study indicate that pride and respect serially mediate the examined relationship through organizational identification.

Practical implications

The study accumulates further evidence that treating employees with care and respect can bring benefits to organizations. Perceiving organizational virtuousness makes employees identify with their organization and view organizational successes as their own. Thus, they become more willing to benefit the organization.

Originality/value

This study is unique to the literature by being the first to examine the relationship between POV and organizational spontaneity through social identity processes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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