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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

John B. Harer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate current practices in employee satisfaction assessment to determine if quality in the production of library services and work…

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3228

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate current practices in employee satisfaction assessment to determine if quality in the production of library services and work systems are being assessed from the employees' perspective. It is grounded in the theoretical perspective that customers judge quality and that employees are internal customers, equally important to assessment efforts as are external customers. The paper argues that employees provide a unique perspective to the assessment of quality that external customers cannot provide and that quality assessment needs to be an additional form of employee assessment from that of employee satisfaction or organizational climate initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of measures in organizational climate surveys gathered from the Association of Research Libraries was performed. Each item of several organizational climate surveys was analyzed for words and phrases identified as associated with quality assessment. Conclusions were made based on this analysis.

Findings

Each of the organizational climate surveys examined included some measures of quality, though there was no consistent focus on quality. Quality issues in these surveys included sharing skills, work load issues, and alignment with library vision and mission.

Research limitations/implications

This is the first part of an ongoing research project. The next steps include content analysis of employee satisfaction instruments and a Delphi study of quality measures gleaned from this analysis.

Originality/value

The paper contends that quality assessment is different than employee satisfaction assessment, but significantly enhances employee assessment in general – providing benefits to both the library and its employees.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Mary Clarke

The article seeks to look at the risks that companies face if employees are not competent and to discuss how different assessment methodologies can be applied to improve…

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617

Abstract

Purpose

The article seeks to look at the risks that companies face if employees are not competent and to discuss how different assessment methodologies can be applied to improve employee competence, performance and reduce risks. The article aims to show that employee misunderstandings can be incredibly expensive and need to be reduced. The paper aims to cite research from analyst IDC which estimates that UK businesses lose £18.7 billion a year as a result of employee misunderstandings.

Design/methodology/approach

The article focuses on the different forms of employee assessments that can be used ranging from observational assessments and training days through to the use of “intelligent” online assessments that measure competence and confidence together.

Findings

The paper discusses the limitations of some assessments types such as observational assessments and then highlights how intelligent assessments have been used effectively to improve employee performance and reduce risk at Eurostar and also within utilities companies.

Practical implications

Intelligent online assessments can be used to help companies improve their training interventions, reduce the cost of training. Importantly it enables them to pinpoint incompetence and knowledge gaps and take action to reduce the risks of costly misunderstandings.

Social implications

The paper aims at creating greater safety for society.

Originality/value

The paper describes a more accurate way of assessing employees by measuring competence and confidence together.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Barbara M. Sorondo

This chapter provides an overview of affect, personality, and job satisfaction, focusing on library employees. A reliable and valid measure for each construct is…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of affect, personality, and job satisfaction, focusing on library employees. A reliable and valid measure for each construct is suggested, and an assessment model is provided. The purpose of the study conducted was to examine the three constructs among library employees, how these constructs relate to each other and to work experience, and whether they differ based on library type or department. The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Big Five Inventory, and Brief Index of Affective Job Satisfaction were administered at the various libraries of a research university. Data were analyzed using statistical software. Library employees scored high in positive affect and job satisfaction, and low in negative affect, and were introverted, agreeable, conscientious, emotionally stable, and open to experiences. Across all libraries, public services employees had higher positive affect and job satisfaction, and lower neuroticism, than technical services employees. In both service areas, positive affect was positively correlated with extroversion and job satisfaction, and negative affect with neuroticism. Work experience was correlated with positive affect only among technical services employees. The assessment model may be applied at libraries of any type and size to assess staff and customize resources for employees to meet their unique needs. Several ideas and applications are provided. This study addresses a gap in the literature by exploring how affect, personality, and job satisfaction are all related among library employees. The free measures may be used in any work setting, facilitating intra- and inter-professional comparisons.

Details

Emotion in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-083-9

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Rajan Selvarajan and Peggy A. Cloninger

The purpose of this paper is to examine how ethical assessments of employees are influenced by job performance outcomes, that is, by an employee's success or failure as…

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4016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how ethical assessments of employees are influenced by job performance outcomes, that is, by an employee's success or failure as measured by a successful or unsuccessful job appraisal.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 180 employees rated the performance of a fictitious salesperson described in one of four written vignettes as successful/ethical, successful/unethical, unsuccessful/ethical or unsuccessful/unethical.

Findings

Job performance outcomes bias the ethical assessments of raters, even raters with stronger ethical beliefs. Successful employees were judged to have exhibited more ethical behaviors than unsuccessful employees.

Research limitations/implications

Job performance outcomes are a systematic source of bias that should be examined to determine the locus of effect as either rater perception and/or recall of ethical behavior that is biased by the job outcomes achieved by ratees. Studies should also examine other rater characteristics such as cognitive moral development; whether ethical intensity of the incidents in the vignettes influences assessments; whether training or other sources of appraisal (e.g. customers or peers) moderates bias; and field settings.

Practical implications

Managers who reward unethical performance with positive job appraisals will influence other employees to be more accepting of unethical behavior and may undermine organizational processes such as background checks. Organizations may try to counter these effects by other sources of appraisal (e.g. customers or peers), training, or supplementary methods.

Originality/value

The research provides important new empirical evidence regarding incorporating ethical behavior into performance appraisals, and has implications for managers seeking to improve employees' ethical behaviors, and for researchers examining performance appraisals, cognition, ethics, and organizational processes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Marjolein C.J. Caniëls and Marcel F. van Assen

Whereas many studies address ambidexterity at the organizational level, much less is known about individual level ambidexterity. Moreover, there is a lack of thorough…

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1414

Abstract

Purpose

Whereas many studies address ambidexterity at the organizational level, much less is known about individual level ambidexterity. Moreover, there is a lack of thorough understanding of how motivational orientations are related to individual level ambidexterity. Yet, it is crucial to have an understanding of what motivates employees who perform explorative and exploitative activities. This study aims to empirically test the link between the constellation of motivational orientations of employees and their ambidexterity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use polynomial regression analysis and surface response analysis to analyze data from 103 employees employed in one Dutch organization. Polynomial regressions allow for analyzing linear and nonlinear direct and interactive effects between different motivational orientations in relation to individual level ambidexterity.

Findings

For individual ambidexterity, it is important to have an assessment orientation that is balanced with a locomotion orientation. Alternatively, people high on only locomotion orientation or only assessment orientation are also ambidextrous.

Originality/value

Insights into the motivational orientation of employees in relation to ambidexterity help to advance the theoretical understanding of how employees may enhance their individual ambidexterity.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Tracy H Porter, Kelly Diane Riesenmy and Dail Fields

A key challenge for organizations is identification of candidates for development as organizational leaders. While selection criteria may vary, one important consideration…

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11576

Abstract

Purpose

A key challenge for organizations is identification of candidates for development as organizational leaders. While selection criteria may vary, one important consideration is the extent to which an employee is motivated to lead. Previous studies have restricted investigation of the antecedents of these motivations to individual differences such as personality, self-efficacy, and previous leadership experiences, suggesting that leadership capacity may depend largely on employee selection. However, employee assessments of numerous aspects of the work environment may also have a substantial role in determining an employee’s motivation to lead (MTL), suggesting that an organization’s leadership capacity may depend on many other human resource practices. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors explored the role of employee assessments of work experiences as determinants of three types of MTL. This paper investigates the impact of a value-oriented organizational culture and the employee’s assessment of the work environment (pay satisfaction, promotion possibilities, recognition, job design, internal communication, and employee’s relationship with his/her current leader). Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Based upon the results of 210 respondents the strength of relationship varies among the three alternative types of leadership motivation. The results suggest that besides individual differences, the perceived work environment may be a significant determinant of motivation to become an organizational leader. Employee assessments of pay, promotion opportunities, recognition, job design, quality of organizational communications, and workplace spirituality all play a role in determining employee MTL.

Originality/value

This paper offers a number of implications for human resource management practices, hiring, and leadership development.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Jared M. Hansen and Michael A. Levin

The purpose of this paper is to provide a more complete theoretical model of retail e‐learning assessment module use. The location (i.e. onsite versus offsite) of…

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3172

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a more complete theoretical model of retail e‐learning assessment module use. The location (i.e. onsite versus offsite) of assessment and prior experience is treated as moderators between motivation/intention, uses, and value; and differences between subjective and objective value are investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, semester‐long, single‐course experiment was conducted using students (n=37) from Mexico and the USA enrolled in a retail‐focused marketing course at a university located near the border between the two countries.

Findings

Extrinsic and intrinsic motivations predict participants' use of e‐learning assessment modules. The objective and subjective value of assessment is strongly impacted by the individual's prior performance. Location of assessment moderator is significant.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to focusing on intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, retailers should also consider the possibility that prior experience and location of assessment can affect use and value. Prior experience levels of the participants were found to affect use. Retailers are cautioned not to assume mistakenly that increased use of e‐learning assessment modules results in lower performance. Rather, people that performed better in the past are less likely to use the modules. It is also found that when individuals can take the assessments offsite (e.g. at home, on the road), there is a positive impact on both objective and subjective performance. Retailers should examine the potential of permitting employees to take assessments from home (over the internet) or other remote locations.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the fact that many retailers have adopted e‐learning assessment technologies that include options for either onsite assessment (e.g. kiosks/PCs in human resource/training rooms) or offsite assessment that operations management and corporate staff can perform outside the office. However, little is known about what motivates people to use e‐learning assessment, and how it affects performance across these two locations for assessment. Moreover, knowledge of how location of use influences the relationships is currently missing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2014

Shu Guo

This paper aims to investigate the practices of a well-established professional development committee (PDC) at an academic library to reveal the development of effective…

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2510

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the practices of a well-established professional development committee (PDC) at an academic library to reveal the development of effective professional development programs with various themes and the diversified delivering formats and the assessment of library employees’ training needs and the effectiveness of professional development programs with Needs Assessment Surveys and Program Follow-up Employee Opinion Surveys. Professional development programs are widely adopted in academic libraries to support the professional growth of library employees and improve the quality of library services. Developing, promoting and administering professional development programs are main responsibilities of the PDC.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based upon the PDC’s recent practices since 2011. The Needs Assessment Surveys (in 2012 and 2013) are conducted electronically, so are the Opinion Surveys since 2013 which are formerly conducted in paper.

Findings

The well-planned professional development program themes with special designed delivery formats have demonstrated their effectiveness through high attendance of each professional development event. The positive results and high compliments from both Need Assessment Surveys and Opinion Surveys also endorse their values to employee’s professional growth.

Originality/value

This paper classifies various professional development program ideas into six program themes and three special delivery formats, and each is presented with intention, planning and organization. This paper also provides details of using different Need Assessment Surveys and Opinion Surveys for evaluation, which is also lacked in published literature.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

James Po-Hsun Hsiao, Chyi Jaw, Tzung-Cheng (T.C.) Huan and Arch G. Woodside

This paper aims to advance a configural asymmetric theory of the complex antecedents to hospitality employee happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of employees

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1500

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance a configural asymmetric theory of the complex antecedents to hospitality employee happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of employees’ quality of work performance. The study transcends variable and case-level analyses to go beyond prior statistical findings of small-to-medium effect sizes of happiness–performance relationships; the study here identifies antecedent paths involving high-versus-low happy employees associating with high-versus-low managers’ assessments of these employees’ performances.

Design/methodology/approach

The study merges data from surveys of employees (n = 247) and surveys completed by their managers (n = 43) and by using qualitative comparative analysis via the software program, fsQCA.com. The study analyzes data from Janfusan Fancyworld, the largest (in revenues and number of employees) tourism business group in Taiwan; Janfusan Fancyworld includes tourist hotels, amusement parks, restaurants and additional firms in related service sectors.

Findings

The findings support the four tenets of configural analysis and theory construction: recognize equifinality of different solutions for the same outcome, test for asymmetric solutions, test for causal asymmetric outcomes for very high versus very low happiness and work performance and embrace complexity.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research in other firms and additional countries is necessary to confirm the usefulness of examining algorithms for predicting very high (low) happiness and very high (low) quality of work performance. The implications are substantial that configural theory and research will resolve perplexing happiness–performance conundrums.

Practical implications

The study provides useful case-level algorithms involving employees’ demographic characteristics and their assessments of work facet-specifics which are useful for explaining very high happiness-at-work and high quality of work performance (as assessed by managers) – as well as algorithms explaining very low happiness and very low quality of work performance.

Originality/value

The study is the first to propose and test the tenets of configural theory in the context of hospitality frontline service employees’ happiness-at-work and managers’ assessments of these employees’ quality of work performances.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Zhengyin Huang, Gregory Harris and Nicholas Loyd

The Toyota Production System has been studied for its business success for several decades. Many companies have tried to imitate but have not achieved Toyota-like results…

Abstract

Purpose

The Toyota Production System has been studied for its business success for several decades. Many companies have tried to imitate but have not achieved Toyota-like results. Failure in the ability to replicate Toyota's supportive culture has been suggested as a cause for the lack of success. Studies on lean implementation have been conducted from external views focusing on visible indicators, but few seek the employee's perception of lean initiatives. The authors propose a Toyota Production System – Toyota Way (TPS-TW) model approach using employee perception and quantitative performance metrics.

Design/methodology/approach

This research represents an improvement of a lean assessment instrument using quantifiable performance metrics for validation and testing it in the Chinese automotive industry. A survey was developed and executed in the Chinese automotive industry with participants involved with lean implementation. Experts helped examine the content validity, and reliability analysis was used to study the structure of the assessment instrument and evaluate internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis and structured equation modeling were used to test the construct validity. Finally, survey results and actual performance were analyzed.

Findings

The results of this research validated the TPS-TW model and assessment instrument in the Chinese automotive industry.

Originality/value

This research validates an employee perception survey that can be utilized by organizations to understand the state of their lean implementation. The research supports the use of employee perception to reflect the reality of a lean initiative and proves the TPS-TW model is an effective theoretical framework for assessment.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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