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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Paul White

Communicating appreciation to employees has been shown to be an important factor in contributing to employee engagement and making workplaces more effective. Research has…

Abstract

Purpose

Communicating appreciation to employees has been shown to be an important factor in contributing to employee engagement and making workplaces more effective. Research has shown that employees differ in how they desire to be shown appreciation. The purpose of this paper is to examine how working remotely (vs onsite), the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic and employees’ age group impacted the ways employees want to be shown appreciation at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the five Languages of Appreciation as a framework (Chapman and White, 2019), over 200,000 individuals’ results from the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory were compared across various groups. The dependent variable: (Primary Language of Appreciation) was examined in light of three independent variables: work setting (onsite vs remote), timeframe (pre-COVID-19 vs during COVID-19) and age range of the employee.

Findings

Preferences for how to be shown appreciation were quite stable across work setting, timeframe and age range, suggesting that one’s preferred ways of being shown appreciation is largely an internal characteristic that is only mildly influenced by external factors. Minor trends were found when comparing various age groups and remote vs onsite employees.

Originality/value

Understanding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on employees’ desires for appreciation is critical for organizational leaders. With vast numbers of new remote employees in the workforce, understanding how they are similar to and vary from onsite employees is paramount for addressing the needs of all team members. This study provides valuable information on both topics, as well as differences across age groups.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Mei Peng Low and Donald Siegel

This paper aims to study the knowledge development and research dissemination on employee-centred CSR research through a social network approach by adopting bibliometric analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the knowledge development and research dissemination on employee-centred CSR research through a social network approach by adopting bibliometric analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the bibliometric data obtained from Scopus, descriptive analysis using social network analysis together with visualisation tool to examine the knowledge development and research dissemination on employee-centred CSR. The publications were identified by limiting search in Scopus database through keywords, namely, Corporate Social Responsibility, Employee and/or Internal Corporate Social Responsibility, from 2000 to 2018 in all document types and access type. The data were analysed by year, source of publication, author, country, affiliation, subject area and term analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that the Journal of Business Ethics and Social Responsibility Journal are the two key journals publishing in employee-centred CSR. The USA and the UK are the two main countries that dominate the publication production. Most of the publications are in the area of business, management and accounting. Main publications are contributed by Andriukaitiene, R., Swaen, V. and Vveinhardt, J. The number of publication increases marginally from year to year. More focus linkages were established between employee-centred CSR with organisational commitment and firm performance in the late 2016.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis and findings are only limited to data retrieved from the Scopus database from year 2000 to 2018 on 31 December 2018. Besides, the selection of the quality criteria is based on researchers’ definition of suitable empirical basis.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper provide insights to the researchers on the development of CSR research has expanded to internal stakeholders. It also contributes by identifying the sources of research and its development trends in employee-centred CSR research.

Social implications

The findings provide a holistic picture of domino effects of CSR initiatives in organisational behaviour. It also further reinforces the awareness internal CSR being another important perspective of CSR.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in its contribution in the bibliometric approach to study the dissemination trend of employee-centred CSR research from the Scopus database.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Joni Romero and Brian H. Kleiner

Looks at global trends for employee motivation, emphasizing that positive reinforcement is the key to motivation. States that reward, recognition, stability and cultural…

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10017

Abstract

Looks at global trends for employee motivation, emphasizing that positive reinforcement is the key to motivation. States that reward, recognition, stability and cultural background have become very important. Uses data from a study of 12,000 students over 41 countries to make this argument. Outlines the measurement and results within the survey. Provides some brief examples from industry.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2019

Thomas N. Garavan, Sinead Heneghan, Fergal O’Brien, Claire Gubbins, Yanqing Lai, Ronan Carbery, James Duggan, Ronnie Lannon, Maura Sheehan and Kirsteen Grant

This monograph reports on the strategic and operational roles of learning and development (L&D) professionals in Irish, UK European and US organisations including…

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1461

Abstract

Purpose

This monograph reports on the strategic and operational roles of learning and development (L&D) professionals in Irish, UK European and US organisations including multinational corporations, small to medium enterprises, the public sector and not for profit organisations. This paper aims to investigate the contextual factors influencing L&D roles in organisations, the strategic and operational roles that L&D professionals play in organisations, the competencies and career trajectories of L&D professionals, the perceptions of multiple internal stakeholders of the effectiveness of L&D roles and the relationships between context, L&D roles, competencies/expertise and perceived organisational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study findings are based on the use of multiple methods. The authors gathered data from executives, senior managers, line managers, employee and L&D professionals using multiple methods: a survey (n = 440), Delphi study (n = 125) and semi-structured interviews (n = 30).

Findings

The analysis revealed that L&D professionals increasingly respond to a multiplicity of external and internal contextual influences and internal stakeholders perceived the effectiveness of L&D professionals differently with significant gaps in perceptions of what L&D contributes to organisational effectiveness. L&D professionals perform both strategic and operational roles in organisations and they progress through four career levels. Each L&D role and career level requires a distinct and unique set of foundational competencies and L&D expertise. The authors found that different contextual predictors were important in explaining the perceived effectiveness of L&D roles and the importance attached to different foundational competencies and areas of L&D expertise.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to have investigated the L&D professional role in organisations from the perspective of multiple stakeholders using multiple research methods.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Elena Alberghini, Livio Cricelli and Michele Grimaldi

This paper aims to discuss the individual participation and involvement affecting the user engagement in social media and to answer the following research questions: Is it

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4402

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the individual participation and involvement affecting the user engagement in social media and to answer the following research questions: Is it possible to measure the individual participation and involvement of social media within organizations? Which factors should be analysed in order to increase the individual participation in social media? Which KPIs should be selected in order to increase the user ' s engagement and increase individual participation in social media? Can social media in a company be measured in terms of their impact on KM?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study that describes how Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are used to monitor and manage the applications of social technologies, which include many tools facilitating the participation and collaboration on the web. The case study was applied to the information and communication technology area of Eni S.p.A., which is an integrated energy company active in over 70 countries in the world.

Findings

Based on the indications obtained from the case study, a methodology is proposed to select and develop the appropriate KPIs in order to manage and monitor the application of social technologies. The methodology turned out to be able to monitor collaboration and knowledge sharing activities among employees and to incentivize participation and involvement of employees who use the company ' s social media.

Practical implications

Organizations can use the suggested methodology as a guideline for managing and monitoring social media inside a company. The possibility of continuously modifying the adopted social media tool by means of corrective actions together with the possibility of adapting the KPIs to new situations make the present methodology an efficient management approach to take on the multifaceted activities of a social media environment.

Originality/value

Few case studies dealing with the applications regarding the implementation and management of social technologies within organizations have been carried out. Similarly, even if some empirical studies have been proposed to analyse what motivates and prevents employees from sharing their knowledge through social media, there appears to be a lack of studies which have taken into consideration the evaluation of the actual benefits in terms of individual involvement and participation, knowledge sharing and increase in performance.

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Denisa Luta, Deborah M. Powell and Jeffrey R. Spence

Our study examined whether work engagement follows a predictable pattern over the course of the work week and the role of personality traits in shaping this pattern.

Abstract

Purpose

Our study examined whether work engagement follows a predictable pattern over the course of the work week and the role of personality traits in shaping this pattern.

Design/Methodology/Approach

We examined these questions with 131 employees from Canada and the United States who provided daily ratings of work engagement over the course of 10 work days.

Findings

Multilevel modeling revealed that employee engagement followed an inverted U-shaped curvilinear pattern from Monday to Friday, peaking midweek. Neuroticism moderated the change pattern of engagement across the work week, such that individuals with higher levels of neuroticism experienced lower and less stable levels of work engagement throughout the work week compared with individuals with lower levels of neuroticism. However, extroversion and conscientiousness did not moderate the change pattern of employee engagement.

Research Limitations/Implications

These results provide insight into the entrainment of work to the work week and how this entrainment is further affected by the personality trait neuroticism.

Practical Implications

Understanding the weekly pattern of work engagement will help leaders’ time work assignments, interventions, and training sessions to keep the levels of employee engagement high.

Originality/Value

Our study revealed novel predictors of within-person engagement: weekly entrainment and neuroticism.

Details

Emotions and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-202-7

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Jia Fang Siew, Siew Chin Wong and Chui Seong Lim

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationships between learning opportunities, person-organization fit, self-directedness career attitude and job hopping…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationships between learning opportunities, person-organization fit, self-directedness career attitude and job hopping among generation Y employees in Malaysian small medium enterprise (SME) service sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Research data was gathered from a sample of 203 generation Y employees from SME service sectors in Malaysia. Partial least squares structural equation modelling is used to perform the data analysis in the present study.

Findings

The results demonstrated that person-organization fit and self-directedness career attitude correlates significantly with job hopping among generation Y employees. However, there is no significant relationship between learning opportunities and job hopping.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides an empirical framework for explaining the job hopping among generation Y employees in SME service based on the review of related careers.

Originality/value

This study offers new insights into the predicting factors of job hopping among generation Y employees in the Malaysian context specifically.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Josh Plaskoff

Organizations must reframe their approach to how they relate to their employees. The new multi-generational workplace demands a new way of thinking about human resource…

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13566

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations must reframe their approach to how they relate to their employees. The new multi-generational workplace demands a new way of thinking about human resource management. Putting the employee’s total experience at the center produces a very different approach, beyond increasing perks or “funifying” the workplace, to engaging the employee in the workplace. The purpose of this study is to reframe the traditional approach to human resource management that better fits that modern workplace and enables the empowerment and engagement that organizations so desperately seek.

Design/methodology/approach

Design thinking is applied to employee experience in an organization. By viewing employee experience as a set of holistic perceptions of that relationship, human resource management transforms into a more strategic process for engaging the employee through meaning and providing value. Six principles for employing this methodology are specified in this paper.

Findings

Perks are not the answer to employee engagement. An organization must understand each employee more deeply and co-design experiences with them that demonstrate care. It must embrace expansive and holistic thinking, face the intangible aspects of organizational life and use tools to help make them tangible, experiment and iterate, building solutions organically, while recognizing that the process is just as important, if not more important, than the product.

Originality/value

Organizations recognize a need for change and struggle with engaging employees. Most modern approaches to engagement and retention foundationally stem from old ways of thinking that will not work in today’s workplace. Design thinking has been applied successfully for customer experience and user experience; it is just beginning to be recognized as an approach for employee experience.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2019

Alessandra Mazzei, Alfonsa Butera and Luca Quaratino

This paper aims to explore the role of employee engagement for competitiveness. In particular, the role of employee communication to create engaging workplaces.

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2233

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of employee engagement for competitiveness. In particular, the role of employee communication to create engaging workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Two field surveys were conducted to assess, which are the most relevant leverages that contribute to create engaging (or disengaging) workplaces in Italy: the first one on a statistical sample of large companies, the second one on a snowball sample of employees.

Findings

Italian companies often miss the opportunity to create engaging workplaces and to exploit the potential of employee communication to foster employee engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Further research could focus on a survey on a sample of managers and employees belonging to the same company.

Practical implications

Companies should pursue an inclusive relational approach, using employee communication appropriately.

Originality/value

The study develops and tests a model showing the linkages among managerial approaches and engaging workplace contexts and examines the role of employee communication to foster employee engagement.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Mehlika Saraç, Bilçin Meydan and Ismail Efil

Most employee attitudes and behaviors are determined by both personal and situational characteristics. Studies on person–organization fit (POF), which is defined as the…

Abstract

Purpose

Most employee attitudes and behaviors are determined by both personal and situational characteristics. Studies on person–organization fit (POF), which is defined as the congruence between individual and organizational values, also support this assumption. Employees who perceive high POF have high positive work attitudes and low intention to leave. However, this study assumes that the relationship between perceived POF and work attitudes may be different with respect to employees’ status and aims to investigate how perceived POF may differ in consequences among blue-collar and white-collar employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple group analysis of structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to test the moderation effect of employee status on the relationship between perceived POF and work attitudes.

Findings

Results indicated that the relationship between perceived POF and organizational commitment, job satisfaction, organizational identification and intention to leave differ with respect to individual’s status (blue-collar–white collar). As the status of the individuals increases, the relationship between POF and work attitudes (organizational commitment, job satisfaction and organization identification) becomes weaker.

Originality/value

Rather than just focusing results of POF, this study focuses on moderating variables that differentiate the relationship between POF and outcomes by considering individual differences caused by different motivation and abilities.

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