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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Piyali Ghosh, Alka Rai, Ragini Chauhan, Gargi Baranwal and Divya Srivastava

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential mediating role of employee engagement between rewards and recognition and normative commitment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential mediating role of employee engagement between rewards and recognition and normative commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses of a sample of 176 private bank employees in India were used to examine the proposed mediated model.

Findings

The variable rewards and recognition is found to be significantly correlated to both employee engagement and normative commitment. Results of regression have been analyzed in line with the four conditions of mediation laid down by Baron and Kenny (1986). Further, SPSS macro developed by Preacher and Hayes (2004) is used to test the proposed mediation model. The relationship between rewards and recognition and normative commitment is found to become smaller after controlling the variable employee engagement. The results provide partial support to the mediation hypothesis.

Originality/value

Normative commitment has been less researched relative to the attention paid to affective commitment. Further, no research has yet focused on the impact of rewards and recognition on normative commitment, with the mediating impact of employee engagement. This study hence provides the first empirical test of the established relationship between rewards and recognition and employee engagement by introducing normative commitment as an outcome variable.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Alka Rai, Piyali Ghosh, Ragini Chauhan and Richa Singh

This study aims to explore the possibility that rewards and recognition may be instrumental in improving both in-role and extra-role performances of retail sales…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the possibility that rewards and recognition may be instrumental in improving both in-role and extra-role performances of retail sales associates, with an underlying mediating role of employee engagement in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted across 35 retail stores in five cities located in North India on 247 sales associates. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted to test the mediation hypotheses. Analysis was done in lines with the conditions of mediation laid down by Baron and Kenny (1986).

Findings

Employee engagement is found to fully mediate the impact of rewards and recognition on in-role and extra-role performances.

Practical implications

Organizations should be committed to recognizing employees’ efforts and providing them with financial and non-financial rewards based on organizational policies. Such measures would improve in-role and extra-role performances through enhancing engagement level of employees.

Originality/value

This study makes significant contributions to literature on employee engagement and that on retail sector, especially in Indian context, through highlighting the mediating role of engagement. Given shortage and retention of skilled manpower as major challenges for Indian retailers, engaging sales associates through rewards and recognition to improve their performance at both in-role and extra-role levels can have significant implications for retailers.

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Lorna Doucet, Bo Shao, Lu Wang and Greg R. Oldham

Previous research has demonstrated the importance of emotion recognition ability in negotiations and leadership, but scant research has investigated the role of emotion…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has demonstrated the importance of emotion recognition ability in negotiations and leadership, but scant research has investigated the role of emotion recognition ability in service contexts. The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a compensatory model in which service employees’ emotion recognition ability helps enhance their job performance, particularly when employees score low on the agreeableness personality dimension or have low cognitive ability.

Design/methodology/approach

With a two-wave multisource dataset collected from a service center of a large retail bank, multiple regression analysis was used to test the moderating roles of agreeableness and cognitive ability on the relationship between service employees’ emotion recognition ability and their performance.

Findings

Service employees’ emotion recognition ability helped enhance their job performance. However, the positive effect of emotion recognition ability on job performance was only statistically significant when employees’ agreeableness or cognitive ability was low.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for how service organizations select and recruit employees. In particular, service employees with low agreeableness or cognitive ability may still be able to perform well when possessing high emotion recognition ability. Therefore, emotion recognition ability should be considered in the selection and recruitment process.

Originality/value

Going beyond self-report measures of emotion recognition and using a performance measure from organizational records, this study is one of the first to examine how emotion recognition ability interacts with personality and cognitive ability in predicting service employees’ effectiveness in a service organization.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Marjolein Feys, Frederik Anseel and Bart Wille

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of co‐workers receiving recognition on two types of responses, namely emotions (positive and negative) and behavioral…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of co‐workers receiving recognition on two types of responses, namely emotions (positive and negative) and behavioral intentions (interpersonal counterproductive behavior and interpersonal citizenship behavior).

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an experimental scenario study with a 2×2 between‐subjects design with 246 employees from a local health care organization.

Findings

The findings reveal that the relation between the recognition of others and positive or negative emotions was moderated by the quality of the relationship between both actors. Further, as hypothesized, the relation between the recognition of others and interpersonal counterproductive behavior was moderated by relationship quality. Contrary to the authors' expectations, relationship quality did not moderate the relation between employee recognition and interpersonal citizenship behavior.

Practical implications

This study provides useful suggestions for managers to diminish undesired (i.e. negative emotions and interpersonal counterproductive behavior) and enhance desired emotions and behaviors (i.e. positive emotions and interpersonal citizenship behavior).

Originality/value

This study is the first to show that employee recognition may have negative effects on the emotions of others and interpersonal behavior (i.e. interpersonal counterproductive behavior).

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Bob Nelson

Most employees at present feel overworked and under‐appreciated. During times of change when we are asking them to do more with less, they report feeling less valued and…

Abstract

Most employees at present feel overworked and under‐appreciated. During times of change when we are asking them to do more with less, they report feeling less valued and more stressed for their efforts than ever before. Recognition represents the single most validated principle for driving desired behaviour and performance in the present work environment. This paper looks to question common approaches to recognise and motivate present employees and how you can better and more frequently recognise those you work with – even with little time, resources or budget – to systematically leverage, build and sustain a culture of recognition at work.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Paul White

This paper aims to address the increasingly low levels of staff morale found in workplaces and the challenges managers have. Employees tend to view employee recognition

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the increasingly low levels of staff morale found in workplaces and the challenges managers have. Employees tend to view employee recognition programs cynically and the reasons for these reactions are explained, along with the negative results which follow. The concept of authentic appreciation is discussed, and the core components necessary for employees to feel truly valued and practical steps that can be taken are outlined.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports lessons learned through the author’s experiences of applying the concepts to workplaces over the past several years.

Findings

Job satisfaction and employee engagement are declining in spite of the proliferation of employee recognition programs. Employees perceive much employee recognition activity as being disingenuous, leading to apathy and sarcasm. There are structural issues that need to be corrected for employee recognition to be perceived as authentic – making recognition less generic, more individualized and communicated regularly in the manner that is valued by the recipients.

Practical implications

Traditional approaches to employee recognition (awards and rewards) need to be re-evaluated. Continuing these activities may actually increase the negativity within a work environment. Learning what each individual employee values and then communicating appreciation to them in ways that are perceived as authentic is critical to having a positive result.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the current (and growing) trend of impersonal employee recognition programs and examines the factors that contribute to recognition being perceived as inauthentic. The author then provides an alternative approach and methodology that facilitates the ability to communicate authentic appreciation.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1981

P.B. Beaumont

The Employment Act 1980 has repealed Sections 11‐16 of the Employment Protection Act 1975, with the result that statutory union recognition provisions no longer exist in…

Abstract

The Employment Act 1980 has repealed Sections 11‐16 of the Employment Protection Act 1975, with the result that statutory union recognition provisions no longer exist in Britain. At the present time there are relatively few people who would mourn the passing of these provisions. From the start many employers were unhappy with what they saw as strongly pro‐union provisions, while the unions became increasingly disenchanged with the lengthy procedural delays in hearing claims, and ACAS itself was unhappy with a number of court rulings that substantially restricted their discretion in hearing and deciding such claims. As a consequence there are likely to be few persons hoping for, much less calling for, the re‐introduction of statutory union recognition provisions, even in a modified form, in the immediate future. Indeed no less an individual than the former Chairman of ACAS himself is on record as saying that:

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Calvin London and Kim Higgot

Reward and recognition systems for individual employees remain one of the controversial areas of quality management. Previous discussions on this aspect of quality…

Abstract

Reward and recognition systems for individual employees remain one of the controversial areas of quality management. Previous discussions on this aspect of quality management, although recognizing their importance, often attribute failure of the system to the method of implementation. This company has made several attempts to develop a process of employee reward and recognition with little success and the various systems lost their prestige among employees. Through the company’s quality committee a new process for employee reward and recognition based on an unbiased assessment by managers, fellow employees and internal customers has been developed. Describes the reward and recognition process developed by the company, including a description of the categories used in the process, overviews of the process in place for acceptance and review of nominations and descriptions of the recognition for awards.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Hassan Younies and Tareq Na’el Al-Tawil

The purpose of this study is to investigate hotel workers’ preferences among the following pairs: intrinsic and extrinsic motivators and non-material and material factors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate hotel workers’ preferences among the following pairs: intrinsic and extrinsic motivators and non-material and material factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the quantitative method and a descriptive design to draw inferences about employees’ preferences for items intended as reward and recognition. Convenience sampling was used in selecting the respondents using a survey questionnaire as the research instrument.

Findings

This study has shown that hospitality employees differ in their preference for some material and non-material items signifying reward and recognition (RR). Management should take these differences into account when devising such incentives. The heterogeneous workforce structure in the United Arab Emirates may complicate the design of an RR system. Practitioners in the hospitality industry may note with interest that achieving employee performance and satisfaction is a complex exercise. The satisfaction that employees derive can be strengthened by focusing on Herzberg’s motivators while employee dissatisfaction could be prevented by addressing hygiene factors. Human resource personnel can achieve a measure of success while developing and administering a compensation program that stimulates effort related to work, tasks or accomplishment of goals. While motivated employees are expected to perform better, employee productivity according to certain research is related to the level of meeting ones’ needs. It is, therefore, important for organizations in the hospitality industry to consider the design of a well-balanced but flexible reward-recognition system that serves motivating employees toward the achievement of organizational goals and meet their own needs.

Originality/value

The writers included demographic information and employment characteristics as part of their study. They included 10 factors, such as language, ethnicity, age, years in company and department among others.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2019

Zulqurnain Ali, Sadia Sabir and Aqsa Mehreen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the firm’s internal factors influence employee engagement (EE), which, in turn, enhances the performance of textile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the firm’s internal factors influence employee engagement (EE), which, in turn, enhances the performance of textile employees. Furthermore, the present study pursues to address the indirect effect of EE on the relationship between the firm’s internal factors and employee performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were taken from 355 participants working in textile mills through a survey approach. Structural equation modeling was run to confirm the proposed model and structural relationships.

Findings

Results highlight that internal communication and reward and recognition are significantly related to EE, except for work‒life balance. Furthermore, EE has a significant effect on the performance of textile employees.

Practical implications

The present study helps the textile managers to improve employee performance while focusing on the firm’s internal factors of engagement. Proactive internal communication and reward system will help to bring a competitive edge and achieve the organizational goals. The findings also provide managers the information to reduce the organization interruptions in enhancing EE and performance.

Originality/value

This study covered the hidden gap in the previous literature on EE and performance, especially in the field of the textile sector by employing Kahn’s theory of engagement.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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