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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Che-Chun Kuo, Ying-Lien Ni, Chia-Huei Wu, Rong-Ruey Duh, Mei-Yen Chen and Chiachi Chang

Studies have reported negative effects of felt accountability on employees' extra-role behavior. Deviating from that focus, this study proposes that leadership plays a…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies have reported negative effects of felt accountability on employees' extra-role behavior. Deviating from that focus, this study proposes that leadership plays a role in shaping the implications of felt accountability for employees' extra-role behavior. We propose that under high transformational leadership, felt accountability can motivate employees to engage in task-relevant information elaboration and facilitate innovative work behavior, a form of extra-role behavior that seeks to improve the work environment.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a pilot study to validate measurements of felt accountability and task-relevant information elaboration in a sample of 202 employees. We then conducted the main study using a time-lagged, multisource survey design with a sample of 120 supervisor–employee pairs.

Findings

The results from the main study reveal that the association between felt accountability and task-related information elaboration is positive and stronger when transformational leadership is higher. Furthermore, task-relevant information elaboration positively predicts innovative work behavior. Finally, when transformational leadership is higher, the mediation effect of task-relevant information elaboration on the association between felt accountability and innovative work behavior is stronger.

Originality/value

Our study indicates that felt accountability can have positive implications for employees' extra-role behavior contingent on leadership styles. In contrast to previous studies that emphasize the negative implications of felt accountability on employees' behavior, our study depicts when and why felt accountability can have positive implications on employees' behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Hyo Sun Jung and Hye Hyun Yoon

This paper aims to explain the relationships among employees’ positive psychological capital (PPC) (hope, self-efficacy, resilience and optimism), job satisfaction (JS…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the relationships among employees’ positive psychological capital (PPC) (hope, self-efficacy, resilience and optimism), job satisfaction (JS) and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) in deluxe hotels. This study also seeks to analyze the effect of JS on the employees’ OCBs. In an era of global competition when the speed of change is increasing, companies’ competitiveness depends on how well they adapt. To respond flexibly to changes, knowing how to use intangible resources is crucial.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was administered to 324 deluxe hotel employees using a self-administered questionnaire. Following Anderson and Gerbing’s (1988) two-step approach, confirmatory factor analysis was first undertaken to assess the overall fit of the three-factor model, structural equation model which was used to examine the hypothesized relationships between the constructs.

Findings

The findings showed that employees’ hope and optimism among PPC have a significant effect on their JS; their hope and resilience affect OCBs. Employees’ satisfaction was positively associated with their OCBs.

Practical implications

It was verified that PPC was an important performance factor that could improve hotel employees’ attitudes and organization’s effectiveness. Employees with high PPC were high in satisfaction with job, positively helped coworkers or superiors, and had high possibility of doing devotional action for organization. Accordingly, there will be a need of forming favorable working atmosphere so that employees can perform job with positive psychology, and of seeking diverse support programs such as counseling program or leisure activity.

Originality/value

Most previous studies have examined PPC mainly in general industries; however, this study focused on hotels as a hospitality industry. This study will have significance as the initial research of having considered that the hotel employees’ PPC formation has significant influence upon the JS and OCBs. It is predicted that positive psychology of hotel employees in a job situation leads to various efforts to develop their organization and their own development, thereby creating performance and strengthening management power.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Samuel Todd and Aubrey Kent

The purpose of this paper is to provide a foundation for future research pertaining to establishing the distinctness of the sport industry from an employee psychology perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a foundation for future research pertaining to establishing the distinctness of the sport industry from an employee psychology perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is rooted in social identity theory which maintains that certain levels of self‐esteem and psychological fulfillment can be derived from one's membership in particular groups. The authors have developed a model of positive social identity in sport organizations that details the benefits and consequences of psychological fulfillment related to employment in the sport industry.

Findings

Within the proposed model, the paper outlines how particular elements of social identity derived from one's employment in sport may play an active role in particular job attitudes by enhancing the employee's self‐esteem and contributing to overall self‐evaluation. It further explains how social identity in the workplace may influence individual outcomes such as organizational citizenship, commitment, satisfaction, and job involvement, depending on the strength of the attitude. The elements of the model are explored and future research directions are given.

Originality/value

A key question to be addressed is whether or not sport is a distinct context within which to apply management theory. This paper proposes a conceptual model and research agenda surrounding the idea that one critical area of distinction may be the psychology of employees.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2021

İrem Kaptangil

The Covid-19 pandemic, which started in China and spread rapidly all over the world in a short time, can be considered as a dynamic struggle that forces all individuals…

Abstract

The Covid-19 pandemic, which started in China and spread rapidly all over the world in a short time, can be considered as a dynamic struggle that forces all individuals and therefore organizations to act with new strategies. When considered in terms of its effects and consequences, it can even be regarded as the beginning of a new world order. In this new order, individuals who are unintentionally exposed to chaos theories and possible disaster scenarios related to Covid-19, both in their daily life and in organizational life, can make an effort to continue their lives with the increase in their anxiety levels. While this new order, which shakes the vital balance, forces individuals to struggle, the managers of the organization become a part of this struggle. In addition to the individual struggles of the employees, organizations are also in a separate struggle as providing the necessary support. In this chaos environment, it is important that the psychological health of the employees and the strategic moves of the organizations are mutually supportive in order to ensure a healthier working life. Therefore, this research was carried out with the support of current data and literature to evaluate the Covid-19 pandemic under the headings of remote work, work−family balance and the psychological reflections they cause. In this context, the changes caused by covid-19 were evaluated from the employee’s point of view, and inferences were made from the possible consequences of the situation.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Social Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-931-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Ilona van Beek, Toon W. Taris, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Veerle Brenninkmeijer

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory focus theory, the paper examines which work goals workaholic and engaged employees pursue and which strategies they use to achieve these goals. Furthermore, the paper examines how workaholism and work engagement relate to three different work outcomes: job satisfaction, turnover intention, and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a cross-sectional survey study among 680 Dutch employees in the banking industry were analysed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The analyses revealed that workaholism was primarily and positively associated with having a prevention focus, whereas work engagement was primarily and positively associated with having a promotion focus. Furthermore, workaholism was negatively related to job satisfaction and job performance, and positively related to turnover intention, whereas work engagement was positively associated with job satisfaction and job performance, and negatively associated with turnover intention. Both forms of heavy work investment almost fully mediated the associations between the regulatory foci and the three work outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions rely on self-report data, a relatively homogeneous sample, and a cross-sectional design. This may have biased our findings to some degree and does not allow inferring causal conclusions.

Practical implications

The findings show that workaholic and engaged employees have different work goals and use different strategies to pursue these goals. Moreover, both forms of heavy work investment are oppositely related to work outcomes. Organizations may develop policies to reduce workaholism and to promote work engagement by influencing their employees' regulatory foci.

Originality/value

The present study demonstrates that two types of heavy work investment can be distinguished, each with a unique motivational make-up and a unique pattern of work outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Md. Aftab Uddin, Monowar Mahmood and Luo Fan

Adopting a multi-level research approach, this study aims to investigate the impact of employee engagement on team performance. It further explores the mediating effects…

Abstract

Purpose

Adopting a multi-level research approach, this study aims to investigate the impact of employee engagement on team performance. It further explores the mediating effects of employee commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour on the employee engagement–team performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows a quantitative method. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire survey using snowball and convenience sampling. Descriptive statistics and bi-variate correlation analyses were conducted using SmartPLS 2 and SPSS 20 software, and subsequently, a structural equation model was developed.

Findings

The study suggests that better employee engagement could improve team performance in organizational contexts. Organizational commitment and citizenship behaviour played a mediating role in the employee engagement–team performance relationship. Further research on the meditating effects of demographic factors is suggested to advance knowledge in the employee engagement domain.

Research limitations/implications

Based on premises of the social exchange theory and the employee stewardship theory, the study integrates multi-level variables to impact of individual employee engagement on organizational team performance. The findings of the study contribute to the existing literature by providing empirical evidence of the impact of individual-level variables on team-level performance. It reiterates the need for multi-level modelling of organizational behavioural research.

Originality/value

The study used a multi-theoretical approach to investigate team performance in organizational contexts, i.e. individual employee engagement, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour. This integrated model using predictors from multiple levels demonstrates that team performance could be enhanced from interactions of different factors of individual behaviour.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Paraskevas Petrou and Evangelia Demerouti

The purpose of this paper is to address regulatory focus (promotion vs prevention) as a trait-level variable and a week-level variable linked to employee job crafting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address regulatory focus (promotion vs prevention) as a trait-level variable and a week-level variable linked to employee job crafting behaviors (i.e. seeking resources, seeking challenges and reducing demands). The authors hypothesized that while promotion focus relates positively to seeking resources and seeking challenges, prevention focus relates positively to reducing demands. Furthermore, the authors expected that the links between week-level regulatory focus and crafting would be stronger when the respective trait-level regulatory focus is high.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted to address the aims, namely, a cross-sectional survey among 580 civil servants and a weekly survey among 81 employees of several occupations.

Findings

The hypothesized links between regulatory focus and job crafting were supported at the trait- and the week-level. Only the link between week-level prevention focus and reducing demands was stronger when trait-level prevention focus was high. Unexpectedly, seeking resources positively related to prevention focus at the week-level.

Practical implications

While prevention states may enhance reducing demands behaviors especially for prevention focussed employees, organizations and managers may use promotion states to enhance seeking resources and seeking challenges behaviors among all types of employees and, thereby, shape a strategy emphasizing the promotion values of growth and development.

Originality/value

The findings shed light to a diverse range of employee motivational orientations (i.e. approach vs avoidance and trait-like vs state-like) behind job crafting and, thus, shed light to individual correlates of job crafting.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Poonam Mehta and Jyoti Sharma

There is dearth of studies in the literature which have discussed the relevance of personal and social resources of employees to protect them from adverse impacts of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is dearth of studies in the literature which have discussed the relevance of personal and social resources of employees to protect them from adverse impacts of emotional job demands. However, interaction effect of these two resources on wellbeing of the employees in context to emotional work is inadequate. The present study is aimed to address the existing gap and investigate the relevance of personal and social resources as moderators in the presence of each other between emotional work and employee wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

The research work has focused on employees working on frontline profiles of civil aviation industry of north India. The responses of 720 frontline employees have been collected through pretested questionnaire. To understand the moderation effect of two variables, model number 3 developed by Hayes (2012) has been applied.

Findings

The findings have revealed that moderator role of social support between emotional work and employee wellbeing. However, research has pointed out that at high level of social support personal resources of employees' start to decline which subsequently reduces the wellbeing of employees.

Research limitations/implications

The present research work has analysed the moderated moderation effect of personal and social resources between emotional work and employee wellbeing. Besides, the relative significance of personal resources vis-a vis social resources empirically in context of employee wellbeing in case of emotional work has also been highlighted in the work.

Practical implications

The results of the study have suggested the employees to receive less social support from friends, family and other significant relationships to protect their personal resources in emotional work settings. Moreover, research work has implicated for employers to draw out the various interventions through which personal resources of employees can be enhanced in emotional work settings. Also, the research has assisted in designing the key competencies for different job domains of emotional work setups.

Social implications

The present study is very substantial in offering various parameters over which wellbeing policies for individuals can be framed. Also, the study has outlined the consequences of receiving different levels of social support which is applicable for that set of population who wants to enhance their personal resources for attaining high wellbeing.

Originality/value

The study has empirically investigated interaction effect of social and personal resources of employees between emotional work and employee wellbeing which is scarce in the literature. Besides, a dark side of social support in emotional work context has also been highlighted which was scarcely discussed in emotional work settings previously.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Gul Afshan and Carolina Serrano-Archimi

Drawing on the self-consistency theory and temporal comparison theory, this study hypothesize that relative perceived supervisor support may positively affect voice…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the self-consistency theory and temporal comparison theory, this study hypothesize that relative perceived supervisor support may positively affect voice behaviour and negatively affect relationship conflict with a supervisor. This relationship happens through the underlying process of supervisor-based self-esteem acts as an underlying mechanism. But, such a relationship would be constrained by the value of temporal perceived supervisor support with high temporal perceived supervisor support strengthen this relationship as compared to low temporal perceived supervisor support.

Design/methodology/approach

Dyad data from 338 samples of employees nested within 50 supervisor workgroups from non-profit firms operating in three different cities in Sindh Pakistan were taken.

Findings

Data analysis showed that employees with a high perception of relative perceived supervisor support engaged in voice behaviour and restrain themselves from the relationship conflict. The supervisor-based self-esteem derived from supervisor support played the role of mediating this relationship. Moreover, temporal perceived supervisor support not only moderated the path between relative perceived supervisor support and supervisor-based self-esteem also the mediational strength of supervisor-based self-esteem in relative perceived supervisor support and voice behaviour and relationship conflict.

Practical implications

It is crucial to integrate social comparison in organizational support theory to view the supervisor–subordinate relationship beyond dyad. Managers should understand social comparison processes in which employees engage in to know how it affects various work attitudes and behaviours.

Originality/value

Given the importance of supervisor–subordinate relationships, the authors extend and build on the concept of social and temporal organizational support to supervisor support. The study is novel in studying such relationship and contribute to the supervisory support relationship literature beyond dyadic level.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Marjo‐Riitta Parzefall and Jari Hakanen

It has been hypothesized that perceived contract fulfilment is positively associated with affective commitment, leading also to reduced turnover intentions, and with…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been hypothesized that perceived contract fulfilment is positively associated with affective commitment, leading also to reduced turnover intentions, and with mental health, and that these relationships are fully mediated by work engagement. Employing the job demands resources (JDR) model, the purpose of this study is to examine the motivational and health‐enhancing properties driven by perceived employer psychological contact fulfilment.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested in a sample of 178 Finnish employees using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The hypotheses were supported. Perceived psychological contract fulfilment had both motivational (psychological contract → work engagement → affective commitment → reduced turnover intentions) and health‐enhancing (psychological contract → work engagement → mental health) effects.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the centrality of perceived psychological contract fulfilment to employees, and the importance of work engagement as a positive affective‐cognitive state at work.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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