Search results

1 – 10 of over 14000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Sofie Rogiest, Jesse Segers and Arjen van Witteloostuijn

Through the combination of change process, context and content the purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of failure or success of organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the combination of change process, context and content the purpose of this paper is to provide a deeper understanding of failure or success of organizational change. This study considers the effect of organizational climate on affective commitment to change simultaneously with quality change communication and employee participation during the change process, while controlling for perceived change impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based on 134 survey responses gathered through surveys in two police forces that recently underwent a merger.

Findings

First, quality change communication is the only process variable that directly impacts affective commitment to change. Second, the results indicate that an involvement-oriented climate positively affects affective commitment to change, mediated through quality change communication.

Originality/value

First, the general understanding of the impact of climate on organizational change is very limited. Second, employee participation and quality change communication are generally studied together. The authors propose that both process variables each have their unique impact on attitudes toward change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Marlene S. Neill, Linjuan Rita Men and Cen April Yue

The purpose of this paper is to examine why and how an open and participative communication climate matters for employee organizational identification and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why and how an open and participative communication climate matters for employee organizational identification and their change-specific responses, specifically employees’ attitudinal and behavioral reactions.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypothesized model, the authors conducted an online survey using a stratified and quota random sample of 1,034 US employees working in diverse industry sectors in June of 2018, with the assistance of a premier global provider of survey services, Survey Sampling International. To test the hypothesized model, structural equation modeling analysis was employed using AMOS 24.0 software.

Findings

An open and participative communication climate directly contributes to employee affective commitment to change and behavioral support. Communication climate featured by openness and participation boosts employee identification with the organization, which leads to positive employee reaction to change. When employees identify with the organization, they tend to believe in the inherent value of the change and are more likely to support the change initiative in action through cooperation and championship.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the study contributes to the change management and communication literature by focusing on the role of communication climate in inducing employee reaction to organizational change. Practically, the study offers insights for change managers, internal communication professionals and organizational leaders. Organizational leaders need to be open, create a trusting atmosphere and actively involve employees in the decision-making process. Organizational leaders and communicators should also strive to boost employee identification with the organization, especially during change.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Jane Mullen, John Fiset and Ann Rhéaume

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between abusive supervision and employee health and safety outcomes in Study 1 and to examine the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between abusive supervision and employee health and safety outcomes in Study 1 and to examine the effect of inconsistent leadership, operationalized as the interaction between transformational leadership and supervisor incivility, on employee safety participation in Study 2.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, survey data were gathered from n=145 healthcare workers. In Study 2, survey data were gathered from n=177 nurses.

Findings

A partially mediated structural model was estimated in Study 1 and the results show that the model provided a good fit to the data χ2 (1)=1.27, p=0.23. Abusive supervision predicted safety climate (β=−0.41, p<0.01) and psychological health (β=−0.27, p<0.01). Safety climate, in turn, predicted psychological health (β= 0.40, p<0.01) and safety participation (β= 0.37, p<0.01). Study 2: moderated regression analysis showed that inconsistent leadership significantly predicted employee safety participation, F(5,144)=4.46, p<0.01.

Originality/value

Theoretical and practical implications for creating psychologically healthy workplaces through interventions aimed at improving leader effectiveness are discussed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Min Li, Wenyuan Huang, Chunyang Zhang and Zhengxi Yang

The purpose of this paper is to draw on triadic reciprocal determinism and social exchange theory to examine how “induced-type” and “compulsory-type” union participation

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on triadic reciprocal determinism and social exchange theory to examine how “induced-type” and “compulsory-type” union participation influence union commitment and job involvement, and how union participation in the west differs from that in China. It also examines whether the role of both organizational justice and employee participation climate (EPC) functions in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data are collected from 694 employees in 46 non-publicly owned enterprises, both Chinese and foreign, in the Pearl River Delta region of China. A multi-level moderated mediation test is used to examine the model of this research.

Findings

Union participation is positively related to organizational justice, union commitment and job involvement. In addition, organizational justice acts as the mediator among union participation, union commitment and job involvement. Specifically, the mediating role of organizational justice between union participation and union commitment, and between union participation and job involvement, is stronger in high-EPC contexts than low-EPC contexts.

Originality/value

Instead of examining the impacts of attitudes on union participation, as per most studies in the western context, this research examines the impacts of union participation in the Chinese context on attitudes, including union commitment and job involvement. It also reveals the role of both organizational justice and EPC in the process through which union participation influences union commitment and job involvement.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Jens Rowold, Sabine Hochholdinger and Jan Schilling

Although proposed from theory, the assumption that career‐related continuous learning (CRCL) has a positive impact on subsequent job performance has not been tested…

Abstract

Purpose

Although proposed from theory, the assumption that career‐related continuous learning (CRCL) has a positive impact on subsequent job performance has not been tested empirically. The present study aims to close this gap in the literature. A model is derived from theory that predicts a positive impact of CRCL, learning climate, and initial job performance on consequent job performance. In addition, CRCL is hypothesized to mediate the impact of learning climate on final job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Implementing a longitudinal approach, this model was tested empirically in a call center context. Within the first year of their respective career, multiple source data were gathered from employees about their formal CRCL activities, their initial performance, as well as their perception about learning climate.

Findings

Results indicated that CRCL predicted final job performance and mediated the impact of learning climate on final job performance. A total of 28 percent of final job performance was explained by the proposed model, highlighting the importance of CRCL for organizational contexts.

Practical implications

The results of this study support the notion that CRCL programs are highly useful for both employees and organizations.

Originality/value

For the first time, the impact of CRCL on job performance is demonstrated empirically.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Basak Yanar, Lynda S. Robson, Sabrina K. Tonima and Benjamin C. Amick III

The purpose of this paper is to use a comparative qualitative case study design to better understand how the observed characteristics of an organization correspond to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a comparative qualitative case study design to better understand how the observed characteristics of an organization correspond to their score on the organizational performance metric (IWH-OPM), a leading indicator tool designed to measure an organization’s occupational health and safety (OHS) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Five organizations were recruited based on their diverse IWH-OPM scores obtained in a previous study. Qualitative data were collected from these cases and analyzed with consideration of OHS leadership; OHS culture and climate; employee participation in OHS; OHS policies, procedures and practices; and OHS risk control. Similarities and differences among organizations were examined in relation to these themes.

Findings

Three distinct groups of firms emerged from the cross-case analysis in terms of their overall OHS performance: high, medium and low. Higher firm IWH-OPM scores generally corresponded to better OHS performance in the workplace as observed through qualitative methods.

Originality/value

The findings are a step toward OHS leaders or practitioners eventually being able, based on an organization’s IWH-OPM score, to have a quick understanding of a workplace’s OHS status and of how best to support further improvement.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Dima Jamali and Yusuf Sidani

The purpose of this paper is to assess the performance of a sample of Lebanese organizations vis‐à‐vis some of the core learning organization dimensions identified in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the performance of a sample of Lebanese organizations vis‐à‐vis some of the core learning organization dimensions identified in the literature, focusing specifically on those dimensions that are considered most salient and relevant in the Lebanese context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper capitalizes on a comprehensive literature review to identify the core dimensions of the learning organization construct to be tackled in the questionnaire. The questionnaire was then compiled, comprising 40 questions consolidated from the published literature, addressing seven key learning organization dimensions. Factor analysis following survey administration allowed for filtering five dimensions of learning organizations that are most salient in the Lebanese context.

Findings

Five salient characteristics of effective learning organizations are identified through factor analysis, namely employee participation, learning climate, systematic employee development, constant experimentation, and learning reward systems. The findings from the Lebanese sample vis‐à‐vis these five dimensions suggest that the main strength of Lebanese firms lies in systematic employee training, while their weakness rests in fostering continuous learning/experimentation.

Originality/value

This paper draws attention to the fact that varying dimensions of learning organizations are accorded attention in different cultures, and it is important to use measurement instruments focusing on these to derive value added insights.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2019

Paulo Marzionna

This chapter discusses the adoption by Brazilian companies of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) methods for individual workplace conflicts. Brazil is an interesting…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the adoption by Brazilian companies of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) methods for individual workplace conflicts. Brazil is an interesting case to study ADR due to its high level of institutionalized individual workplace conflicts and its extensive workplace statutory regulation. Investigating the case of three Brazilian private companies of different sectors and sizes, I found that Brazilian companies are developing their own ADR practices, focusing on ombudsman offices (OOs), instead of using the mediation and arbitration methods that are predominant in the United States. I argue that the adoption of the ombudsman can be explained by institutional and workplace level factors, which include the characteristics of Brazilian industrial relations system, each company’s human resources (HRs) strategy, and the relationship between companies and unions. Furthermore, I discuss how the usage rate of the OOs might vary according to the OO’s internal structure and its functioning rules. The cases provide important insights for scholars interested in ADR in general and in Brazilian industrial relations system, as well as union leaders, HR managers, and other practitioners dealing with workplace conflicts globally.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-192-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Deepak Chawla and Himanshu Joshi

This paper aims to report the preliminary findings of the difference in learning organization (LO) practices across industries. It also reports the impact of knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the preliminary findings of the difference in learning organization (LO) practices across industries. It also reports the impact of knowledge management (KM) dimensions on LO and whether this impact is different across manufacturing, IT and IT‐enabled services (ITES) and power generation and distribution in India.

Design/methodology/approach

In this exploratory study, a convenience sample of 51 respondents from Indian manufacturing, IT/ITES and power generation and distribution industries are taken. Based on the literature, a number of hypotheses are formulated and tested to illustrate whether KM and LO practices vary across industry groups.

Findings

An inference to the research questions suggests that IT and ITES industry score highest on most of the LO dimensions. Testing of hypothesis reveals that most of the KM dimensions have a positive impact on LO. Type of industry did not have any statistical differential impact on the dimensions of LO in most cases.

Research limitations/implications

The study includes 15 responses from ITES and eight from power generation and distribution. A larger sample from these two industries would have been desirable.

Practical implications

Findings of the study can serve as input to organizations to integrate the two disciplines by developing KM best practices to create a LO for improving performance.

Originality/value

While KM has been studied in the Indian manufacturing, pharmaceutical and IT industries, its comparison across industries has not been carried out.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Suzanne Nobrega, Cesar Morocho, Michelle M. Robertson, Alicia Kurowski, Serena Rice, Robert A. Henning and Laura Punnett

Total Worker Health® (TWH) programs, which represent a holistic approach for advancing worker safety, health and well-being, require an employer to adapt programmatic…

Abstract

Purpose

Total Worker Health® (TWH) programs, which represent a holistic approach for advancing worker safety, health and well-being, require an employer to adapt programmatic coordination and employee involvement in program design and delivery. Organizational readiness for such measures requires competencies in leadership, communication, subject expertise and worker participation. In the absence of documented methods for TWH readiness assessment, the authors developed a process to prospectively identify implementation facilitators and barriers that may be used to strengthen organizational competencies and optimize the organizational “fit” in advance.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed-method baseline assessment instruments comprised an online organizational readiness survey and a key leader interview; these were administered with key organizational and labor leaders in five US healthcare facilities. Findings about organizational resources, skills available and potential implementation barriers were summarized in a stakeholder feedback report and used to strengthen readiness and tailor implementation to the organizational context.

Findings

The research team was able to leverage organizational strengths such as leaders' commitment and willingness to address nontraditional safety topics to establish new worker-led design teams. Information about program barriers (staff time and communication) enabled the research team to respond with proactive tailoring strategies such as training on participant roles, extending team recruitment time and providing program communication tools and coaching.

Originality/value

A new method has been developed for prospective organizational readiness assessment to implement a participatory TWH program. The authors illustrate its ability to identify relevant organizational features to guide institutional preparation and tailor program implementation.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 14000