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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Peter Boxall, Meng-Long Huo, Keith Macky and Jonathan Winterton

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle…

Abstract

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle individual job tasks or a high level of involvement at team or workplace level in designing work procedures. When implementations of HIWPs are accompanied by companion investments in human capital – for example, in better information and training, higher pay and stronger employee voice – it is appropriate to talk not only of HIWPs but of “high-involvement work systems” (HIWSs). This chapter reviews the theory and practice of HIWPs and HIWSs. Across a range of academic perspectives and societies, it has regularly been argued that steps to enhance employee involvement in decision-making create better opportunities to perform, better utilization of skill and human potential, and better employee motivation, leading, in turn, to various improvements in organizational and employee outcomes.

However, there are also costs to increased employee involvement and the authors review the important economic and sociopolitical contingencies that help to explain the incidence or distribution of HIWPs and HIWSs. The authors also review the research on the outcomes of higher employee involvement for firms and workers, discuss the quality of the research methods used, and consider the tensions with which the model is associated. This chapter concludes with an outline of the research agenda, envisaging an ongoing role for both quantitative and qualitative studies. Without ignoring the difficulties involved, the authors argue, from the societal perspective, that the high-involvement pathway should be considered one of the most important vectors available to improve the quality of work and employee well-being.

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Elizabeth P. Karam, William L. Gardner, Daniel P. Gullifor, Lori L. Tribble and Mingwei Li

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the…

Abstract

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the past decade. Consideration of the implications of these constructs for high-performance human resource practices (HPHRP) is limited, however. In this monograph, we present a conceptual model that integrates authentic leadership/followership theory with theory and research on HPHRP. Then, we apply this model to systematically consider the implications of skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing HR practices in combination with authentic leadership for authentic followership, follower work engagement, and follower performance. We contend that authentic leadership, through various influences processes, promotes HPHRP, and vice versa, to help foster enhanced work engagement. By cultivating greater work engagement, individuals are motivated to bring their best, most authentic selves to the workplace and are more likely to achieve higher levels of both well-being and performance.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Gustavo A. García, Diego René Gonzales-Miranda, Oscar Gallo and Juan Pablo Roman-Calderon

The purpose of this paper is to empirically study the effect of employee involvement in the workplace on job satisfaction for millennial workers in Colombia.

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3482

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically study the effect of employee involvement in the workplace on job satisfaction for millennial workers in Colombia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from a sample of 2103 millennial employees working in 11 companies of different sectors located in the five main cities of Colombia. Ordered probit models were estimated to study the effect of employee involvement on job satisfaction, in general, and how different forms of participative decision making in the workplace produce different impacts on individual satisfaction with objective and intrinsic aspects of the job, in particular.

Findings

The empirical results show that, for millennial workers, there is a positive link between employee involvement and job satisfaction. Moreover, there is a higher positive impact on job satisfaction when millennial workers participate in decisions on general aspects of the company than when they participate in specific decisions such as those concerning teamwork or main tasks at work. Another interesting result is that millennial workers attach high importance to intrinsic aspects of their jobs (such as the possibility to use their knowledge in the work), which may improve their satisfaction in a higher participative environment.

Research limitations/implications

The results can present bias due to the use of self-report data from millennial workers. Another potential limitation is the cross-sectional nature of the data, which does not control for unobserved individual effects. The study may be extended to other developing countries to help identify results more precisely for different contexts.

Originality/value

The value lies in exploring the relationship between employee involvement and job satisfaction for millennial workers in the context of a developing country. The paper simultaneously considers different types of employee involvement and estimates their effects on different facets of job satisfaction.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Tomas Hellström

To develop a decision model supporting employee involvement in industrial vulnerability reduction.

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1872

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a decision model supporting employee involvement in industrial vulnerability reduction.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis review of some of the relevant extant literature on technological/industrial vulnerability, and their application within a normative decision‐making model (i.e. the “Vroom‐Yetton model”).

Findings

The insights on vulnerability drawn from the literature are highly amenable to a systematic decision‐making model for employee involvement. Various aspects of vulnerability, specifically with regard to substantial, social and temporal dimensions may be included in such a model.

Research limitations/implications

New insights about the context‐dependent aspects of vulnerability are offered by considering these within a contingency decision model. This suggests that vulnerability categories are not absolute, but have to be assessed in relation to a specific decision‐making framework.

Practical implications

The developed model provides a way of weighting various dimensions of vulnerability and making more appropriate decisions regarding leadership style in a range of circumstances.

Originality/value

While decision models exist for assessing risk in organizations, no contingency model for employee involvement in vulnerability assessment has been presented to date.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2003

Sonny S. Ariss

Companies in general have not lived up to their ethical responsibility in assisting workers in decreasing workrelated accidents and illnesses. This paper presents a…

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1164

Abstract

Companies in general have not lived up to their ethical responsibility in assisting workers in decreasing workrelated accidents and illnesses. This paper presents a systematic four‐stage employee involvement model that was successful in transforming a company’s culture to become a model for preserving workers’ rights to safe working conditions. By changing the prevailing management ideology on safety, the model offers a positive solution to improving workplace safety and morale, while preserving the workers’ rights to be involved in decisions that affect the quality of their lives.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Liezel Vargas-Sevalle, Masoud Karami and Sam Spector

The hospitality and tourism industry is highly labor-intensive. It is constituted by a fast-paced, dynamic, unpredictable and unstable operating environment that requires…

Abstract

The hospitality and tourism industry is highly labor-intensive. It is constituted by a fast-paced, dynamic, unpredictable and unstable operating environment that requires an extraordinary leadership ability, and leaders may need to adopt a transformational leadership style. A plethora of theoretical and empirical studies have shown the importance of transformational leadership. However, there is still much to be learned. Meanwhile, no study to date has measured the relationship between transformational leadership, job involvement, and job satisfaction among employees in the hospitality and tourism industry in New Zealand. This study expands our understanding of transformational leadership in the specific context of hospitality and tourism.

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

M. Muzamil Naqshbandi, Ibrahim Tabche and Neetu Choudhary

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between empowering leadership style and two types of open innovation: inbound and outbound. The intervening…

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2359

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between empowering leadership style and two types of open innovation: inbound and outbound. The intervening mechanism of employee involvement climate in these relationships is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses data collected using a questionnaire survey from middle and top managers working in various firms in northern India.

Findings

Results reveal that empowering leadership positively affects both types of open innovation. Thus empowering leadership supports followers to seek, integrate and diffuse new ideas and knowledge to improve open innovation outcomes. Further, the mediating role of employee involvement climate is established for empowering leadership-inbound open innovation link. This suggests that an empowering leadership style creates an employee involvement climate that empowers employees and involves them in relevant decision-making which consequently enhances a firms inbound open innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study used a cross-sectional research design and a relatively small sample size. These limitations can affect generalizability of the findings.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to leadership and open innovation literatures and provides insights into how the practitioners can use an appropriate leadership style to maximize success in the open innovation paradigm. The study is one of the first to empirically shed light on this strand of open innovation research.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2019

E. Kevin Kelloway and Vanessa Myers

The service-profit chain model (Heskett, Jones, Loverman, Sasser, & Schlesinger, 1994) highlights the well-documented relationship between employee and customer attitudes…

Abstract

The service-profit chain model (Heskett, Jones, Loverman, Sasser, & Schlesinger, 1994) highlights the well-documented relationship between employee and customer attitudes suggesting that employees who are satisfied and engaged with their work provide better customer service resulting in higher levels of customer satisfaction and, ultimately, driving firm revenue. The authors propose an expansion of the service-profit margin identifying the leadership behaviors that create positive employee attitudes and engagement. Specifically, the authors suggest that leaders who focus on recognition, involvement, growth and development, health and safety, and teamwork (Kelloway, Nielsen, & Dimoff, 2017) create a psychologically healthy workplace for customer service providers and, ultimately, an enhanced customer experience.

Details

Examining the Role of Well-being in the Marketing Discipline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-946-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Narendar Sumukadas

The purpose of this article is to study the effect of employee involvement (EI) practices on quality comprehensively.

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4805

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to study the effect of employee involvement (EI) practices on quality comprehensively.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper views the EI domain as sets of related practices interacting within a hierarchy. Using survey data, the paper tests a model of higher order practices building on a foundation of lower order practices to affect quality.

Findings

The results support a hierarchical conceptualisation of EI practices. Some practices are found to be more effective than others, yet even the less effective EI practices serve a supportive purpose.

Research limitations/implications

The model was analyzed from a predictive perspective, using a relatively small sample. Rather than simply identifying some EI practices as more effective than others, it is important to view the practices as being interrelated.

Practical implications

Cherry‐picking only the most effective EI practices may not work. Managers must first install a foundation of less effective practices.

Originality/value

EI is recognised as an important enabler of quality management initiatives. Yet, much of this support is based on normative and untested prescriptions. This paper provides such a test. The paper models the entire EI domain, as sets of related practices rather than a hodgepodge of sporadic individual practices. Further, the paper presents a unique conceptualisation of an EI hierarchy.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Paul Kivinda Muisyo, Su Qin, Thu Hau Ho and Mercy Muthoni Julius

The rising public concern for the natural environment is compelling business entities to revise their business models toward green management. Most manufacturing firms…

Abstract

Purpose

The rising public concern for the natural environment is compelling business entities to revise their business models toward green management. Most manufacturing firms have realized that green innovation is a critical factor that drives their success. However, green human resource scholars have overlooked this research line despite the potential contribution it can advance in green management scholarship. This paper empirically models the extent to which green innovation culture (GIC) moderates the relationship between green human resource management (GHRM) and green competitive advantage (GCA). The paper has two-fold objectives. First, to investigate the effects of GHRM and GIC on the firm's GCA and second, to model the extent to which GIC moderates the link between GHRM practices and GCA of manufacturing firms in Zhejiang Province of China.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 324 Chinese employees from the manufacturing sector. The authors captured data from all levels of the organization. The authors made three models equations: two direct and one interactive. The authors then applied structural equation modeling (SEM) using AMOS 24 to test the study models and hypothesis.

Findings

The findings suggest that GHRM practices, which include recruitment and selection, training and development (green abilities); performance management and reward and compensation (green motivation); and employee involvement and leadership (green opportunities) have a significant positive effect on the firms GCA. The findings also indicate that firms that GIC, which include green product innovation (GPDI) and green process innovation (GPRI), promotes the firm's GCA. The paper further reveals that firms that combine GHRM and GIC attain higher GIC than those which practice GHRM only.

Originality/value

This paper draws a roadmap on how the top management in manufacturing firms can drive the firm's operations toward a higher GCA. It's the pioneer paper to suggest the combination of GHRM and GCI for enhanced GCA.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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