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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Terry Pegg

The potential impact of employee benefits on individuals and their dependants is significant and growing as new products and solutions come on to the market. The aim of…

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5917

Abstract

Purpose

The potential impact of employee benefits on individuals and their dependants is significant and growing as new products and solutions come on to the market. The aim of this paper is to investigate how benefits impact on employees and the organization as a whole, and how organizations are choosing to inform their people about the type of benefits on offer.

Design/methodology/approach

Research conducted by AIG UK Benefits seeks to provide an insight into the current employee benefits environment and in particular to the areas highlighted above. The research consisted of a two‐stage study undertaken by the AIG UK corporate research and development team between November 2007 and January 2008.

Findings

The study highlights the differences between the perceptions of employers/HR professionals and employees when it comes to the awareness and understanding of the benefits on offer and asks whether employees are really to blame if they fail to appreciate the true value of their employers' voluntary employee benefits.

Originality/value

There is an opportunity for HR to improve benefits communications. The study looks at how one UK retailer has successfully implemented a strong communications program and presents steps that employers and reward professionals can take to improve their own benefits communications.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Colin Jellicoe

This article aims to review how one organization – Vinci – leveraged a strategic and integrated approach to employee benefits to unify three different businesses, each…

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558

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to review how one organization – Vinci – leveraged a strategic and integrated approach to employee benefits to unify three different businesses, each with their own, different set of T&Cs, employee benefits and benefit providers. This work was undertaken in the midst of economic recession that put significant pressure on the business to retain and reward its people.

Design/methodology/approach

The article provides best practice case evidence that outlines how effective employee consultation and buy‐in was generated, employee communication was delivered and understanding of the new employment package was disseminated to staff.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the positive and far‐reaching impact of the work to unify employee benefits provision across these merging organizations. With over 99 percent of employees signing their revised T&Cs and employees making savings of over £500,000 in tax and NICs (National Insurance Contributions), the work undertaken at the organization has, understandably, had a positive effect on employee turnover and overall levels of engagement.

Originality/value

The article presents a first‐hand account of the work carried out to bring the businesses together and ensure the company could offer a strong and engaging employment and benefits package.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Jon‐Chao Hong, Sung‐De Yang, Li‐Jung Wang, En‐Fu Chiou, Fan‐Yin Su and sui‐Lan Huang

Everyone works in expectation of some rewards, and welfare is oneof them. In order to understand the impact of employee benefits onemployees′ work‐motivation and…

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40289

Abstract

Everyone works in expectation of some rewards, and welfare is one of them. In order to understand the impact of employee benefits on employees′ work‐motivation and productivity, questionnaires were sent to corporations which had undertaken employee benefit programmes. Some of the significant results of this study are: employee benefit programmes have greater impact on work‐motivation than on productivity; monetary benefit programmes are most highly valued by both executives and workers; there is a cognitive gap between management and worker on the importance of employee benefit programmes; different genders have different benefit demands; unmarried employees, more than married employees, perceive that employee benefits have a greater impact on job performance. Employees with different education levels and positions perceive different employee benefit impacts; and employee benefit programmes have greater influence on younger employees′ job performance.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Ronald McGaughey, Victor Puleo and K. Michael Casey

The purpose of this research paper is to provide practitioners and researchers with guidance and ideas for benchmarking employee benefits in companies providing…

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2448

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to provide practitioners and researchers with guidance and ideas for benchmarking employee benefits in companies providing professional services. The research addressed employee benefits in multi‐owner accounting firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a survey of a large number of multi‐owner accounting firms (CPA firms) were analyzed to examine professional employee benefits and to look at the relationship between firm size and benefits offered.

Findings

An analysis of survey results suggested that larger firms offer better benefits than smaller firms. Larger firms tend also to be more profitable. Various employee benefit metrics were examined.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was limited to accounting firms in the United States, so the findings may have limited value for researchers and practitioners in other countries.

Practical implications

The better benefits offered by larger accounting firms may allow them to attract better personnel, possibly accounting for their greater profitability. If this is indeed true, then a good benefit package may well be a key success factor for accounting firms, and possibly for other professional services. Firms seeking to improve their competitive position may, therefore, find it advantageous to benchmark their professional employee benefits against the benefit packages of larger more profitable competitors.

Originality/value

This paper examines professional employee benefits in multi‐owner accounting firms and identifies metrics that could be useful to practitioners in benchmarking those benefits. The metrics identified and other findings may provide practitioners with ideas for benchmarking benefits in other professional service organizations.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2020

Eleanna Galanaki

Employee benefits, a critical element of total employee rewards, are important for both employers and employees. This study aims to explore the utility of employee benefits

Abstract

Purpose

Employee benefits, a critical element of total employee rewards, are important for both employers and employees. This study aims to explore the utility of employee benefits for male and female employees during the recent economic recession. In doing so, it intends to highlight an indirect deterioration of employment arrangements and equality in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the findings of three repeated large-scale surveys during the Greek crisis (2012-2015, total N = 3,498).

Findings

Employees report that the availability of employee benefits has decreased during the recession and that women find more utility in them than men do. Additionally, women seem to be affected more than men by decreases in employee benefits allocation.

Research limitations/implications

The present findings support calls for contingent employee reward allocation.

Practical implications

Employers wishing to sustain their competitive advantage by fostering inclusion and diversity and/or employers with a high female employee ratio are encouraged to consider increasing their employee benefits portfolio.

Social implications

The recent economic crisis and the subsequent recession have brought about several potential negative effects, in terms of the employment conditions for women. Decreased employee benefits are a hidden negative effect of the recession for female employees and it presents multiple, potential and unforeseen consequences for gender diversity and inclusion.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study to address non-monetary employee remuneration under the lens of gender pay differentials. It does so in a turbulent macro-economic setting.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Rajib N. Sanyal and Turgut Guvenli

A survey of employee benefits provided to host country non‐managerial employees in China by American firms indicates that these tend to change over time, vary by the size…

Abstract

A survey of employee benefits provided to host country non‐managerial employees in China by American firms indicates that these tend to change over time, vary by the size of the firm, and differ between wholly owned and joint ventures. Statistical analysis suggests that the use of certain extrinsic and intrinsic benefits tends to be positively perceived by Chinese employees, and in turn, these favorably impact specific dimensions of organizational performance. The findings show that American firms provide benefits that recognize established practices in China and the current needs of Chinese workers. Implications for employee benefits managers in foreign firms are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2019

Eleanna Galanaki

Employee benefits represent a large proportion of operational costs in most sectors, but discussions of their outcomes have been inconclusive. The purpose of this paper is…

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1116

Abstract

Purpose

Employee benefits represent a large proportion of operational costs in most sectors, but discussions of their outcomes have been inconclusive. The purpose of this paper is to decipher the effects of employee benefits on organizational commitment in a changing and largely uncertain environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Three repeated large-scale surveys in Greece during the recent recession are used (2012, 2013 and 2015, total n=3,498).

Findings

A new taxonomy of employee benefits based on employees’ subjective utility evaluations is developed and applied. Availability of benefits and changes in the allocation policies of benefits are found to significantly but not powerfully influence organizational commitment. The setting in which this exchange is realized is critical for the relationships developed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted in a single country during the recession and trough phases of the business cycle and employee benefit allocation is measured with employee perceptions. Future research is called to couple present findings with international research at diverse phases of the business cycle and objective or company-provided measures of employee benefits.

Practical implications

Employers are advised to draft long-term employee benefit strategies, avoid frequent adjustments and provide multiple types of employee benefits, to increase affective organizational commitment.

Originality/value

This is the first time employee benefits are treated as a whole, and effects of their allocation and of changes in their allocation are explored at the employee level.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Melinda Laundon, Abby Cathcart and Paula McDonald

Employee reward is central to contemporary debates about work and employment relations; and in the context of ongoing wage stagnation, benefits represent a growing…

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2398

Abstract

Purpose

Employee reward is central to contemporary debates about work and employment relations; and in the context of ongoing wage stagnation, benefits represent a growing proportion of total reward value. Past studies have shown that when employees perceive benefits as unfair, this has a negative impact on engagement, performance and retention. Yet no previous studies have explored the components of a benefits system that influence employees’ fairness concerns. Using organisational justice as a theoretical lens, the purpose of this paper is to examine how dimensions of an employee benefits system influence the fairness perceptions of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a qualitative, inductive case study of the benefits system in a large finance and insurance company, drawing on three data sources: interviews with the company’s benefits managers, organisational documents and open-text responses from a benefits survey.

Findings

Three dimensions of the benefits system strongly influenced fairness perceptions – constraints on accessing and utilising benefits; prosocial perceptions about the fairness of benefits to third parties; and the transparency of employee benefits.

Practical implications

The study informs organisations and benefits managers about the important role of supervisors in perceived benefits usability, and how benefits may be managed and communicated to enhance employee fairness perceptions.

Originality/value

This study makes a conceptual contribution to the benefits literature through a detailed exploration of the type of organisational justice judgements that employees make about benefits; and identifying for the first time prosocial fairness concerns about the impact of benefits on third parties.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2018

Lorena Ronda, Carmen Valor and Carmen Abril

The present study aims to propose a novel employee-centric framework for the study of employer brand attractiveness. This framework disentangles the role of employer…

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2687

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to propose a novel employee-centric framework for the study of employer brand attractiveness. This framework disentangles the role of employer attributes, employee benefits and employee perceived value in the study of employer brands to better develop policies for talent attraction. Additionally, this study formulates a research agenda to help advance an employee-centric view of the employer’s brand management by following the tradition of customer-centric research and identifying benefits and forms of value that are yet unexplored.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper performs a systematic and critical review of the literature on employer brand attraction from the lens of means-end chains to examine how the notions of “employer attributes”, “employee benefits” and “perceived value” have been addressed in past studies and what relations have been established among these three concepts.

Findings

The results unveil the existing conflation among attributes, benefits and value in the conceptualization of employer brand attractiveness. By proposing an employee-centric framework following the tenets of current consumer-centric paradigms, this paper disentangles the notions of attributes, benefits and value in the creation of attractive employer brands; establishes a hierarchical relationship among them; and suggests studying the multiple paths of relationships between attributes and benefits. These conditions should help organizations understand how to create successful strategies to ultimately ensure that they are selected as employers of choice.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to clarify the domains in which the already studied empirical relations hold. This could be achieved by conducting a laddering process based on a means–end chain approach. Additionally, the impact of this framework on the construction of effective value propositions and employee market segmentation should be further explored.

Originality/value

This paper has revisited the construct of employer brand from a means–ends approach to propose an employee-centric view guiding employer brand strategies. As competition for the best employees sharpens, understanding how employer brand traits are valued in the eyes of different segments of employees and applicants may help organizations to develop more effective strategies to attract the best talent.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Carlien Hillebrink, Joop Schippers, Anneke van Doorne‐Huiskes and Pascale Peters

The purpose of this study is to examine what kinds of Dutch organisations offer their employees a choice in the composition of their benefits with the aid of a theoretical…

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1544

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine what kinds of Dutch organisations offer their employees a choice in the composition of their benefits with the aid of a theoretical model that incorporates insights from rational choice theory, the theory of institutional pressures and the bundles of human resource management (HRM) theory.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the theoretical model data were collected from nearly 600 Dutch organisations in the market sector. Multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were used to analyse these data.

Findings

The research showed that flexible benefit plans (FBPs) are widespread and show a considerable degree of consistency in the options they offer. FBPs are most likely to be offered by organisations that have freedom to manoeuvre in their benefits, that witness other organisations around them offering such arrangements, and that offer HRM policies and practices that are strongly focussed on the combination of work and family, and on flexibility in working arrangements.

Research limitations/implications

Attention to HRM policies in addition to a combination of rational choice and institutional theory proved valuable in explaining the uptake of a new arrangement, and this merits further exploration.

Practical implications

FPBs offer Dutch organisations the opportunity to give their employees more choice in the way they are paid, and to adjust this pay to their personal situation. Offering this choice fits in with a family‐friendly HRM structure and increases flexibility for both parties.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on FBPs.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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