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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Rebecca A. Thacker and Kelly B. Holl

The purpose of this paper is to identify behaviorally‐based training for management trainees with a foundation in employees' beliefs about effective managerial behaviors

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify behaviorally‐based training for management trainees with a foundation in employees' beliefs about effective managerial behaviors, and the relationship of these behaviors to employees' satisfaction with supervision, company as employer, and job assignments.

Design/methodology/approach

Manufacturing organization and social services agency employees (N=134) were surveyed by questionnaire and asked “How important do you think it is that managers exhibit the following behaviors?” and “How well does your manager exhibit the following behaviors?” Factor analysis produced three factors: Connection with employees, Vision, Autonomy. Employee satisfaction questions were included.

Findings

Vision and Autonomy scales for “How well does your manager exhibit the following behaviors?” showed significant, positive correlations for satisfaction with quality of supervision, and with company/agency as an employer. Connection with employees scale for “How important do you think it is that managers exhibit the following behaviors?” showed significant, positive correlations for employees' satisfaction with job assignments

Research limitations/implications

Future research should include employees' perceptions of what constitutes effective managerial behaviors. Study should be replicated in larger, multicultural organizations to assess the universality of these managerial behaviors.

Practical implications

Specific recommendations for behaviorally‐based manager training of management trainees, based on employee‐identified behaviors, are provided.

Originality/value

The paper is creative in its inclusion of employees in data collection of definition of effective managerial behaviors and is valuable to those interested in management trainee programs linking behaviorally‐based development to employee satisfaction outcomes.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Sunhyuk Kim, Grimm Noh and Siyu Miao

Employee voice behavior is an important source of corporate competitiveness but employees often face difficulties in voicing their opinions. This research analyzes how…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee voice behavior is an important source of corporate competitiveness but employees often face difficulties in voicing their opinions. This research analyzes how authentic leadership may increase psychological safety perceived by employees, consequently encouraging employees to actively share their ideas. In addition, the authors explore the unique concept of Zhongyong thinking, a way of thinking that is common in cultures rooted in Confucianism. The authors analyze how Zhongyong thinking may affect the relationship between psychological safety and employee voice behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

For the empirical analysis of authentic leadership and employee voice behavior in the Chinese context, the authors distributed surveys to employees working in various different industries in various provinces in China. The authors distributed 250 surveys in total and 213 surveys were used for analyses.

Findings

The authors' empirical analyzes illustrate that authentic leadership increases employee voice behavior, partially mediated by psychological safety. The authors also analyzed how psychological safety's effect on employee voice behavior could be moderated by Zhongyong thinking. The results demonstrate that the effect of psychological safety on voice behavior is weaker when employees are capable of exercising Zhongyong thinking.

Originality/value

Zhongyong thinking is still a relatively new concept that has not been studied thoroughly, and to the authors' knowledge, Zhongyong thinking has never been studied as a moderator in the relationship between psychological safety and employee voice behavior.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2022

Eric Delle, Anthony Sumnaya Kumasey, Anthony Nkrumah Agyabeng, Atia Alpha Alfa and Farhad Hossain

Drawing on the self-extended and regulatory focus theories, the present study examined the mechanism as well as the boundary condition under which psychological ownership…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the self-extended and regulatory focus theories, the present study examined the mechanism as well as the boundary condition under which psychological ownership might relate positively to the work engagement of employees working in public sector organizations in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from employees (n = 313) working in public sector organizations in Ghana at a single point in time with a survey questionnaire.

Findings

The results indicated that psychological ownership and self-regulatory focus behaviors (i.e. prevention and promotion focus behaviors) were beneficial for work engagement; and that while prevention focus mediated psychological ownership-work engagement relationship, that relationship was positive and stronger for employees who performed less promotion focus behaviors.

Practical implications

Managers in public sector organizations should understand that employees with strong psychological ownership would feel more engaged if they perform less promotion focus behaviors.

Originality/value

The authors’ study contributes uniquely to the nascent work engagement literature in the Ghanaian context, and by testing boundary conditions and underlying mechanisms increased the authors’ understanding of work engagement among public sector employees in Ghana.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Paul Lyons and Randall Paul Bandura

The purposes of this paper are to: help managers and other practitioners learn about voluntary, helpful employee behavior; provide examples of how such behavior is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are to: help managers and other practitioners learn about voluntary, helpful employee behavior; provide examples of how such behavior is manifest in everyday work situations, and demonstrate how to assess the behavior for recruitment and selection. A brief study is presented that demonstrates how valid and reliable measures may be used to identify employee predisposition for voluntary, helpful behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Two substantive components of this work are: a detailed literature review that describes and demonstrates the elements of voluntary, helpful behavior (v-hob); and a report of a brief correlational study that demonstrates how two short surveys may help in predicting employee voluntary, helpful behavior.

Findings

Literature review reveals that v-hob is related to many positive employee outcomes among which are better work performance, more positive relationships with co-workers and managers, and lower turnover, as contrasted with employees-in-general. The study undertaken reveals two measures: job dedication, and contextual performance are valuable in predicting employee v-hob.

Research limitations/implications

In the survey portion of this paper the sample size is relatively small yet amenable for statistical analysis. Study participants are representative of a single academic discipline and are representative of the same university. The two survey tools used have repeatedly been shown to have validity and reliability.

Practical implications

This paper offers a detailed view of employee helpful behavior and it helps managers develop ways to assess one ' s proclivity for the behavior.

Originality/value

This paper helps managers, HR specialists and others attain knowledge on the expression of employee v-hob. Two survey tools are provided to help identify employees who may be predisposed to offer this desirable behavior.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2022

Saroja Wanigasekara, Muhammad Ali, Erica Lynn French and Marzena Baker

Research suggests that engaging in networking behaviors can affect individual work outcomes. However, relatively less is known about how internal versus external…

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that engaging in networking behaviors can affect individual work outcomes. However, relatively less is known about how internal versus external networking behaviors influence work outcomes, and whether gender moderates these relationships. Drawing on social capital theory and social role theory, the authors propose a positive relationship between employees' internal and external networking behaviors and their work outcomes (job commitment and career success), and the moderating effect of gender. The authors also explore employee preference in networking.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sequential mixed-method research design with a four-month time lag, Study 1 data on networking behaviors and employee outcomes were collected via a survey of middle managers and their supervisors from 10 private sector organizations in Sri Lanka. Study 2 data were collected via interviews from a sample of those middle managers and their supervisors.

Findings

Study 1 findings indicate a positive relationship between internal networking behaviors and job commitment, and external networking behaviors and career success. The authors also found that internal networking behaviors enhance job commitment. Study 2 findings indicate men and women network differently and benefit differently from that networking but achieve equitable workplace benefits.

Originality/value

This study provides pioneering evidence that internal networking behaviors enhance job commitment among women. It appears that past research did not test the moderating effect of gender for internal versus external networking behaviors separately. Moreover, this study refines the evidence that internal and external networking behaviors differentially impact employee outcomes and explains the processes through a qualitative inquiry.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2022

Hannah Vivian Osei, Isaac Atta Junior Ampofo and Angelina Osei

When pluralistic ignorance about cyberloafing is increased, individuals engage more in cyberloafing. Cyberloafing has become a great challenge in business organisations…

Abstract

Purpose

When pluralistic ignorance about cyberloafing is increased, individuals engage more in cyberloafing. Cyberloafing has become a great challenge in business organisations, and it is believed that many organisations do not complete their daily activities as a result of employee cyberloafing. Using the social norms theory as the main theoretical framework, the current study aims to assess the effects of prescriptive social norms on employee cyberloafing with the moderating effects of power distance and co-worker interdependency.

Design/methodology/approach

The data sample included 237 employees from six large organisations in the service sector. This study used a survey to collect data at different times and analysed the data using hierarchal regression and Hayes Process Macro.

Findings

Findings revealed that there exists a positive and significant impact of supervisors' approval of cyberloafing on employees' cyberloafing. Co-workers' approval of cyberloafing does not have any impact on employee cyberloafing. Power distance was found to moderate the relationship between supervisors' approval of cyberloafing and employees' cyberloafing. However, co-workers' interdependency did not moderate the relationship between co-workers' approval of cyberloafing and employees' cyberloafing.

Originality/value

This research examines employees' cyberloafing behaviours and highlights the adverse consequences of prescriptive social norms in a work environment characterised by co-workers' interdependence and power distance.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Muhammad Faisal Malik, Qurat-ul-Ain Burhan, Shazia Akhtar and Muhammad Shafiq

The research intended to identify the impact of employee exploitation on knowledge-sharing behavior and withdrawal, not in isolation, but by taking psychological ownership…

Abstract

Purpose

The research intended to identify the impact of employee exploitation on knowledge-sharing behavior and withdrawal, not in isolation, but by taking psychological ownership and psychological detachment as mediating variables. Moreover, the research aims to identify optimism’s moderating role concerning employee exploitation and psychological ownership. The research aims to suggest the management implementation of the human-centric business process and, subsequently, management to obtain maximum output from employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Positivism research philosophy followed by a deductive approach is adopted to meet the objectives of the current study. Survey techniques with a self-administrated questionnaire were used to collect data from employees working in public sector organizations. Moreover, 255 employees with the highest qualification were shortlisted to capture the variables’ impact. Data analysis was done by using SEM-AMOS approaches and obtained structural and path models to test the formulated hypotheses.

Findings

Results suggested that employee exploitation has a significant relationship with withdrawal, and psychological detachment mediates the relationship. The other path suggested the insignificant role of optimism as a moderator in the relationship between employee exploitation and psychological empowerment. However, psychological empowerment fully mediates the relationship between employee exploitation and knowledge-sharing behavior.

Originality/value

A plethora of research is available on employee exploitation; however, the current research is first to capture both positive and negative paths in public sector organizations. It provides clear insights for managers to reformulate and reanalyze their organizational policies to get employees' positive attitudinal and behavioural outcomes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Salman Zulfiqar, Zoia Khan and Chunhui Huo

The study aims to explore ‘motivational climate', which designs the recurring patterns associated with employees' attitudes, behaviour, and feelings. If organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore ‘motivational climate', which designs the recurring patterns associated with employees' attitudes, behaviour, and feelings. If organizations successfully adopt a motivational climate, such climate influences the performance and behavior of employees to a great extent. Responsible leadership plays a constructive role in injecting a motivational climate in an organization to ensure information flow. In a motivational climate, top management or leaders reward their employees for individual progress, improvement and mastery. Knowledge sharing is supported in a mastery climate because such a climate can reduce the motive of knowledge hiding and instead further help in stimulating creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Study was to scrutinize a moderated-mediation model, a quantitative hypothetic deductive approach to verify the hypotheses of the study. The data were gathered from employees and supervisors of advertising agencies and marketing departments in metropolitan cities of Punjab, Pakistan. Such firms and departments are considered because they offer a great opportunity to relevant variables and their relations. These organizations and departments are the most creativity-seeking domains and involve frequent interactions (for instance, regular meetings) between leaders with their employees and among peers. Data were primarily gathered from managerial employees performing their duties in the areas mentioned above.

Findings

Current study reveals that RL has a positive and significant relation with employee creative behaviour. Increasing RL characteristics can ultimately boost employee performance in the creativity domain. Being a responsible leader becomes mandatory for leaders to foster employee creativity to maintain the sustainability of an organization. It is confirmed from the results that responsible leadership articulates the mind thinking of employees, which creates an open environment of information while persuading creative and similar behaviour.

Originality/value

The current research investigates how responsible leadership can efficiently leverage the stakeholder approach in influencing employees through a knowledge-based pathway to boost their creative behaviour. The current study tends to uncover the mediating effect of the basic construct of knowledge management, which is knowledge sharing. Knowledge sharing enables employees to exchange their information while creating mutual understanding, which helps in the smooth flow of knowledge within the organization; this flow enriches employees to think openly in a creative and appreciative environment.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2022

Liqian Yang, Qian Zhang, Hao Gong and Yanyuan Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between union practices and two types of employees’ extra-role behaviors, namely, union citizenship behavior

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between union practices and two types of employees’ extra-role behaviors, namely, union citizenship behavior (UCB) and employee voice (EV), and the mechanisms that mediate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using matched data from 46 union leaders and 279 union members of 33 workplaces in China, this study utilized multilevel structural equation modeling to test the cross-level influences of union practices on employees’ extra-role behaviors and the mediation effects.

Findings

The results show that (1) union practices have a positive impact on employees’ UCB and EV, and (2) union practices increase UCB and EV through the improvement of industrial relations (IR) climate at the workplace level, as well as union commitment (UC) and union instrumentality (UI) at the individual level.

Research limitations/implications

Although the authors collected data from multi-sources (i.e. union leaders and members), the cross-sectional data of this study limited the ability to make casual inferences.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by providing theoretical explanation and empirical evidence to illustrate the role of union practices in increasing the extra-role behaviors of employees (i.e. UCB and EV). This is of particular importance in elaborating the effectiveness of enterprise unions under the recent reforms in China. In addition, the authors also unpacked the antecedents of extra-role behaviors in the union context by investigating how IR climate, UC and UI mediate the relationship between union practices and extra-role behaviors of employees.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Erik Poutsma, Coen van Eert and Paul E. M. Ligthart

This paper investigated the effect of employee share ownership, mediated through psychological ownership, on organizational citizenship behavior. The analysis included the…

Abstract

This paper investigated the effect of employee share ownership, mediated through psychological ownership, on organizational citizenship behavior. The analysis included the possible complementary role of High Performance Ownership systems. This paper investigated these relationships by analyzing employee survey data from a Dutch organization that has implemented employee share ownership. We used PLS, a variance-based structural equation model to test the hypotheses. The results showed a direct influence of employee ownership on organizational citizenship behavior, but the relationship was not mediated by psychological ownership. Unexpectedly, the results show that a High Performance Work System bundle without employee ownership generates psychological ownership, but this does not influence organizational citizenship behavior. This research could not confirm the comprehensive model in which employee ownership, HRM system, and psychological ownership are positively related to each other. We choose a deliberate set of HR practices on theoretical grounds, but future research could investigate other sets of HR practices that may produce the expected effects. This research showed that employee ownership has a positive influence on organizational citizenship behavior. Organizations are therefore advised to consider implementing employee ownership. The results also show that a set of HR practices positively influences psychological ownership. The results suggest that organizations should strive for a consistent message, which makes the employees feel that they are taken serious as and deserve to be owners. We analyzed the influence of a configuration of high performance ownership system on psychological ownership and organizational citizenship behavior that is not done before.

Details

Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory & Labor-Managed Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-379-2

Keywords

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