Search results

1 – 10 of over 51000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Rafael Borim-de-Souza, Eric Ford Travis, Luciano Munck and Bárbara Galleli

Inspired by objective hermeneutics (Oevermann, 1984, 1996, 1999; Oevermann et al., 1979; Weller, 2010; Wohrab-Sahr, 2003) and qualitative validation (Adcock and Collier…

Abstract

Purpose

Inspired by objective hermeneutics (Oevermann, 1984, 1996, 1999; Oevermann et al., 1979; Weller, 2010; Wohrab-Sahr, 2003) and qualitative validation (Adcock and Collier, 2001; Martis, 2006; Maxwell, 1992), the authors present this essay with the aim of proposing an objective hermeneutic approach to qualitative validation.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to develop this approach, the authors consider the contributions of Martis (2006) and Maxwell (1992) about theoretical–empirical validity, Adcock and Collier's propositions (2001) regarding the conceptualization and evaluation of phenomena through specific levels, tasks and stages of validation and the principles of objective hermeneutic interpretation proposed by Wohlrab-Sahr (2003).

Findings

Three main contributions are considered: theoretical–empirical validity (Martis, 2006; Maxwell, 1992); levels of validation – theoretical framework, systematized concept, indicators and results (Adcock and Collier, 2001); stages of validation – content validity, convergent validity and nomological validity (Adcock and Collier, 2001); and principles of objective hermeneutic interpretation – sequential interpretation, mental–experimental explanation of possible interpretations, preservation rule, literal character of interpretation, totality, reflection about knowledge used in the analysis and group of interpreters (Wohrab-Sahr, 2003). These contributions were related to establishing a framework that illustrates the proposed objective hermeneutic approach to qualitative validation.

Originality/value

The authors intend to offer to the scope of organization studies an alternative for validation, so that the voices of the researched can be heard. Furthermore, the authors seek to guide researchers as to how to respect and protect what is heard, in order to avoid any invasion of others' discourse.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Dan Baugher, Ellen Weisbord and Chris Ramos

In the public sector, Training and Experience (T & E) exams assess prior experience and are one of the most often used methods for selecting job applicants. This…

Abstract

Purpose

In the public sector, Training and Experience (T & E) exams assess prior experience and are one of the most often used methods for selecting job applicants. This study uses a KSA approach, where raters judge the quality of job relevant prior experience, not its duration or quantity. It was hypothesized that an additional rater and a consensus meeting between raters would increase reliability and validity.

Design/methodology/approach

T & E and supervisory ratings were obtained over a 12-year period for 166 candidates seeking promotion to a budget analyst position. Validity was measured by the correlation between T & E scores and supervisory ratings. Consensus was required only for T & E scores differing by a specific amount (hybrid consensus).

Findings

Intraclass reliability was 0.73, 0.84, and 0.95 in the one-rater, two-rater, and hybrid consensus conditions with each coefficient greater than the next (p < 0.05) showing the benefit of multiple raters and consensus for reliability. Validity was significant at 0.21, 0.26, and 0.251 for each rating condition, respectively (two-tail test; p < 0.01). Validity was greater in the two-rater condition than in the one-rater condition (one-tail test; p < 0.05). Consensus did not improve validity beyond that of two raters. For consensus T & Es (n=76), two raters improved validity (one-tail test; p < 0.05), moving from 0.112 to 0.231 but not reliability; consensus improved reliability (two-tail test; p < 0.05) but not validity.

Originality/value

There has been a vacuum in T & E research for close to 20 years. Validity data are difficult to obtain but critical for meta-analysis. T & Es showed validity. Use of two raters improved validity but consensus did not increase the gain.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Awni Zebda, Barney Cargile, Mary Christ, Rick Christ and James Johnston

Auditing researchers have recommended that the use of audit decision models should be subject to cost‐benefit analysis. This paper provides insight into cost‐benefit…

Abstract

Auditing researchers have recommended that the use of audit decision models should be subject to cost‐benefit analysis. This paper provides insight into cost‐benefit analysis and its shortcomings as a tool for evaluating audit decision models. The paper also identifies and discusses the limitations of other evaluation methods. Finally, the paper suggests the use of model confidence as an alternative to model value and model validity.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 22 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

James Reardon and Chip Miller

Methodological advances in cross‐cultural scale development have addressed many concerns regarding the development of valid scales. However, several issues remain to be…

Abstract

Purpose

Methodological advances in cross‐cultural scale development have addressed many concerns regarding the development of valid scales. However, several issues remain to be examined – including the potential problems of using language to measure communication phenomena using self‐reported studies and addressing the effect of response scale type on the validity of resultant measures. The purpose of this paper is to expand the cross‐cultural measurement paradigm by comprehensively examining these issues and suggesting a new response scale type that may potentially produce more valid cross‐cultural measures of communication‐based phenomena.

Design/methodology/approach

Measures of Hall's concept of context were developed using three types of response scales – Likert, semantic differential, and conceptual metaphoric. The last response scale type is developed within this research. Samples were gathered in 23 countries using existing scale development procedures. The response scales were compared for psychometric properties and validity based on reliability, metric invariance, response styles, and face validity.

Findings

Overall all three response scale types adequately measured the construct of context. The newly developed conceptual metaphoric scale performed marginally better on most comparative metrics.

Practical implications

International marketers measure a host of variables related to culture for many purposes. The new response scale type may provide slightly better measures to more accurately reflect communication based constructs – many of which are central to marketing.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that the new conceptual metaphoric response scale type may overcome some existing biases inherent in standard response scale types. In addition, this research provides the first viable and parsimonious measure of Hall's concept of context.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

The critical dimension and the one that can unify knowledge through systemic interrelationships, is unification of the purely a priori with the purely a posteriori parts…

Abstract

The critical dimension and the one that can unify knowledge through systemic interrelationships, is unification of the purely a priori with the purely a posteriori parts of total reality into a congruous whole. This is a circular cause and effect interrelationship between premises. The emerging kind of world view may also be substantively called the epistemic‐ontic circular causation and continuity model of unified reality. The essence of this order is to ground philosophy of science in both the natural and social sciences, in a perpetually interactive and integrative mould of deriving, evolving and enhancing or revising change. Knowledge is then defined as the output of every such interaction. Interaction arises first from purely epistemological roots to form ontological reality. This is the passage from the a priori to the a posteriori realms in the traditions of Kant and Heidegger. Conversely, the passage from the a posteriori to a priori reality is the approach to knowledge in the natural sciences proferred by Cartesian meditations, David Hume, A.N. Whitehead and Bertrand Russell, as examples. Yet the continuity and renewal of knowledge by interaction and integration of these two premises are not rooted in the philosophy of western science. Husserl tried for it through his critique of western civilization and philosophical methods in the Crisis of Western Civilization. The unified field theory of Relativity‐Quantum physics is being tried for. A theory of everything has been imagined. Yet after all is done, scientific research program remains in a limbo. Unification of knowledge appears to be methodologically impossible in occidental philosophy of science.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Jian-Min Sun and Biying Wang

This article verified the construct of servant leadership and validated a measure developed in Western culture. Results from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (N=285…

Abstract

This article verified the construct of servant leadership and validated a measure developed in Western culture. Results from exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (N=285) produced a five-factor model – altruistic calling, emotional healing, persuasive mapping, wisdom, and community stewardship with less items than the original measure. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) (N=304) indicated that the 5-factor servant leadership model fits the data best. Correlation analysis of the supervisor-subordinate paired sample (N=209 dyads) showed that servant leadership has more common features with transformational leadership and less with paternalistic leadership; the predictive power of servant leadership was roughly equivalent to that of transformational leadership but higher than that of paternalistic leadership when predicting criterion variables such as overall satisfaction and deviance behavior. Our results totally demonstrated that the revised servant leadership scale in Chinese culture has higher reliability and validity, which could be used for subsequent studies as an effective instrument.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-256-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2016

Bryan G. Cook, Melody Tankersley and Timothy J. Landrum

Educators’ decisions regarding what instructional practices they use have significant consequences for the learning and life outcomes of their students. This is especially…

Abstract

Educators’ decisions regarding what instructional practices they use have significant consequences for the learning and life outcomes of their students. This is especially true for students with learning and behavioral disabilities, who require highly effective instruction to succeed in school and achieve their goals. In this volume of Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities chapter authors provide readers with accessible information on theory, critical elements, and research for instructional practices that are and are not supported by bodies of scientific research as effective in critical outcome areas. Educators can use this content to inform and enhance their instructional decision making. To contextualize subsequent chapters, in this introductory chapter we discuss the research-to-practice gap in special education, the importance of considering scientific research when making instructional decisions and considerations for interpreting and applying research findings on instructional practices. We conclude with a preview of the chapters in the volume.

Details

Instructional Practices with and without Empirical Validity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-125-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Gedaliahu H. Harel, Anat Arditi‐Vogel and Tom Janz

This research investigated the relationship between job performance ratings for 39 Israeli medical unit managers and two types of performance predictor: ratings from…

Abstract

This research investigated the relationship between job performance ratings for 39 Israeli medical unit managers and two types of performance predictor: ratings from behavior description (BD) interviews and ratings from an assessment center. The BD validity 0.53 compared favorably with the 0.62 obtained by the assessment center. Utility analyses that table the financial return for investing in the more expensive assessment process under different levels of tenure, number of new hires, and selection ratio, reveal the conditions under which assessment centers pay off best.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Md. Moddassir Alam, Pallab Sikdar, Amresh Kumar and Arun Mittal

The study considers a four-construct model for validating the factors of overall patient satisfaction with medication. This paper aims to study the satisfaction of…

Abstract

Purpose

The study considers a four-construct model for validating the factors of overall patient satisfaction with medication. This paper aims to study the satisfaction of patients with their medication. Patient satisfaction with medication influences treatment-related behaviors, such as their possibility of continuing to use their medication, to take their medication correctly and to adhere with medication regimens.

Design/methodology/approach

treatment satisfaction questionnaire for medication (TSQM) version 1.4 patient satisfaction model has been tested for reliability and validity through confirmatory factor analysis. A structured questionnaire, incorporating variables identified from original TSQM version 1.4 (Atkinson et al., 2005), has been used as a survey instrument for the study. Final respondent sample size was 380 patients who were on medication for a minimum duration of 10 days.

Findings

In total, 75 per cent of the willingly participating patients were found to adhere to medication regimen as advised by their physician. Effectiveness, side effects, convenience and global satisfaction were found to be reliable and valid factors for assessing satisfaction with medication among patients in emerging market settings.

Originality/value

The existing studies on measuring patient satisfaction have been majorly confined to developed economies. There is lack of focused research on patient satisfaction and its underlying determinants in the emerging market settings. The present study is an attempt to fill the existing research gap.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-807-0

1 – 10 of over 51000