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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Tobias Kraemer and Matthias H.J. Gouthier

Personnel turnover entails considerable costs and is a major problem for the call center industry. By modifying the job demands-resources model, this study aims to examine…

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3609

Abstract

Purpose

Personnel turnover entails considerable costs and is a major problem for the call center industry. By modifying the job demands-resources model, this study aims to examine how emotional exhaustion and organizational pride affect turnover intentions. In addition, it investigates how emotional exhaustion and organizational pride are formed by job demands and job resources and how gender and organizational tenure moderate the model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper surveyed 252 call center agents and tested the research hypotheses with component-based structural equation modeling. Two multi-group analyses clarify the proposed moderating effects of gender and organizational tenure.

Findings

Emotional exhaustion and organizational pride essentially determine turnover intentions. Organizational pride, which has received little attention in related research, plays a central role. Two job demands and three job resources strongly influence emotional exhaustion and organizational pride, respectively. Gender and organizational tenure moderate several effects.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on a sample of call center agents from three different call centers in one country. Therefore, the generalizability of the findings has to be tested. Furthermore, the paper examines turnover intentions, which are good predictors of turnover behavior. Nevertheless, further research should investigate the relationship between the variables and actual turnover. Moreover, the model included six different job determinants. Future research should test the proposed model with other job demands and resources.

Practical implications

Emotional exhaustion and organizational pride substantially affect turnover intentions. Call center managers should protect employees from emotional exhaustion and enhance organizational pride, using specific job demands and resources. This study shows how the importance of certain variables differs for various groups of employees.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine how certain job resource foster organizational pride and how organizational pride affects voluntary employee turnover in call centers. Further, the study demonstrates that the socio-demographic variables gender and organizational tenure moderate the creation of emotional exhaustion and organizational pride, which together explain a large amount of the variance in turnover intentions among call center agents.

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Journal of Service Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Muhammad Kashif, Anna Zarkada and Ramayah Thurasamy

The episodes of customer rage with employees during service encounters are common and adversely affect the long-term commitment of employees with an organization. The…

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1046

Abstract

Purpose

The episodes of customer rage with employees during service encounters are common and adversely affect the long-term commitment of employees with an organization. The service organizations, in an effort to control employee turnover, are striving hard but have failed. There are a wide variety of studies that address employee turnover but the research which encapsulates a combined effect of perceived justice and organizational pride to study exhaustion-turnover path are almost scant. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of customer aggression on the frontline food service managers’ emotional exhaustion and turnover intentions. The mitigating effects of perceived distributive justice and emotional organizational pride are also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 250 frontline employees of global fast food chain outlets located in the city of Lahore, Pakistan. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling by AMOS.

Findings

The customer aggression is found to influence emotional exhaustion which in turn reduces job satisfaction and increases turnover intentions among frontline food service managers. The mitigating effects of distributive justice on the customer aggression to emotional exhaustion path and of emotional organizational pride on the job satisfaction to turnover intentions path are confirmed.

Practical implications

The results reveal importance of maintaining a supportive and justice-oriented organizational culture. Rewarding frontliners, celebrating the organizational successes that build pride, and acknowledging the emotional burden misbehaving customers place on employees are identified as shields to guard against employee dissatisfaction and turnover.

Originality/value

The turnover intentions resulting from the emotional exhaustion caused by customer aggression in the global fast food industry is studied for the first time. Furthermore, the inclusion of distributive justice and emotional organizational pride as cognitive and affective factors that reduce the effects of customer aggression on frontliners is unique to this study.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2020

Omar Durrah, Kamaal Allil, Moaz Gharib and Souzan Hannawi

This empirical study aims to explore the impact of two facets of organizational pride (namely, emotional and attitudinal) on employee creativity in petrochemical companies…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical study aims to explore the impact of two facets of organizational pride (namely, emotional and attitudinal) on employee creativity in petrochemical companies in the Sultanate of Oman.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a simple random sample technique, data were collected using a questionnaire from 278 respondents working in five major petrochemical organizations operating in Oman. Data were examined using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings revealed that attitudinal organizational pride is the only dimension of organizational pride that has a direct significant positive effect on creativity, while emotional pride does not affect creativity.

Research limitations/implications

The current study is considered among the pioneering studies in its contextual field. However, despite its importance, it has several limitations. First, this study is limited to the petrochemical sector. Second, the study is limited to two variables: organizational pride and creativity. Last, this study examined creativity as one variable.

Practical implications

Attitudinal organizational pride directly affects employee creativity. Petrochemical managers should consider and enhance attitudinal organizational pride.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature investigating the attitudinal and emotional aspects as facets of organizational pride in relation to employee creativity, and it is the first to do so in the context of the Sultanate of Oman.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Matthias H.J. Gouthier and Miriam Rhein

Organizational pride of service employees presents a vital, but mostly unexplored, factor for business success. In detail, two kinds of organizational pride exist. First…

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6482

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational pride of service employees presents a vital, but mostly unexplored, factor for business success. In detail, two kinds of organizational pride exist. First, service employees can experience short, persistent affective emotions of pride based on the perception of a successful event related to the organization. Second, employees can have a cognitive and durable attitude of pride resulting from the general perception of the organization. Prior research neglects not only to analyze empirically the relationship between emotional organizational pride and attitudinal organizational pride, but also to examine positive effects from them. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship and the effects of the two kinds of organizational pride with commitment to customer service, creativity and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The first study is an exploratory pre‐study and deals with spontaneous impressions of 53 customer consultants regarding their emotional and attitudinal organizational pride. Data used for the main study were collected through an online panel provider. A sample of 733 service employees was generated and structural equation modeling was applied to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results from the main study suggest that there is a strong relationship between emotional organizational pride and attitudinal organizational pride. Whereas the former has a direct, positive effect on commitment to customer service and creativity, the latter directly influences commitment to customer service and turnover intention. An indirect effect on creativity was also found.

Research limitations/implications

To reduce the complexity of the model, no moderating variables were integrated. In a subsequent step, it is important to analyze empirically the drivers and conduct a longitudinal analysis to test the relationship between the two kinds of organizational pride and their effects over time.

Practical implications

The measurement and management of organizational pride are vital sources for improving service behaviors; they represent new challenges for service‐oriented human resource management.

Originality/value

The paper is novel for three reasons. First, the affective events theory (AET) is advanced by additional substantial relationships. Second, links between the two kinds of organizational pride are analyzed for the first time. Finally, the paper suggests empirical evidence for the positive effects of the two kinds of organizational pride.

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Aisha Rehman Ansari and Muhammad Kashif

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of brand identification (BI), brand knowledge (BK) and brand psychological ownership (BPO) to predict brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of brand identification (BI), brand knowledge (BK) and brand psychological ownership (BPO) to predict brand citizenship behaviours (BCB) in a mediating role of brand pride.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data collected from 372 front line employees (FLEs), employed in different banks in Pakistan, the path analysis through structural equation modelling procedures is used to perform data analysis.

Findings

The results show that BI, BK and BPO strongly predict BCB in a mediating role of brand pride.

Practical implications

The results have pragmatic value to guide managers and marketing policymakers to develop a brand culture where the company as a brand is internally owned by its employees. The supervisors should offer FLEs with opportunities to speak up and must socialize with them so that communication touch points can be established and strengthened. Furthermore, delegation of authority and positive enforcement are important tools to trigger psychological ownership among FLEs.

Originality/value

Three antecedents (i.e. BI, BK and BPO) to advocate and channelize brand-oriented citizenship behaviours are unique to this study. Furthermore, the mediating role of brand pride is yet another unique contribution.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Marta Mas-Machuca, Jasmina Berbegal-Mirabent and Ines Alegre

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between work-life balance, organizational pride and job satisfaction. When evaluating employee work-life balance…

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13941

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between work-life balance, organizational pride and job satisfaction. When evaluating employee work-life balance the present paper takes into consideration two relevant antecedents: supervisor support and job autonomy; and explores their link with organizational pride and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

To verify the hypothesis, a questionnaire survey was used to collect data in a Spanish pharmaceutical organization; 374 responses were obtained. Structural equation modeling was used for the data analysis.

Findings

Data confirms the relationship between the analyzed constructs. The results support the hypothesized relationships of supervisor work-life balance support and autonomy with employee work-life balance. In addition, employee work-life balance is positively related with organizational pride and job satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study provides a useful measurement model that employers and employees can use to evaluate and improve work-life balance through job autonomy and supervisor support. Companies should pay attention to employee work-life balance to enhance organizational pride and job satisfaction. The research tries to help companies to more effectively use their human capital resources.

Originality/value

The paper addresses gaps in the current literature in work-life, organizational pride and job satisfaction. The results may serve as the criteria for managers to better enhance employee job satisfaction in organizations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Zahid Hameed, Ikram Ullah Khan, Tahir Islam, Zaryab Sheikh and Safeer Ullah Khan

The purpose of this paper is to extend the corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature by examining the influence of a firm’s external CSR activities (efforts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature by examining the influence of a firm’s external CSR activities (efforts directed toward external stakeholders of the firm) and internal CSR activities (efforts directed toward employees) on employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors toward the environment (OCBE) via organizational pride. The authors also examine the moderating role of perceived organizational support (POS) between CSR and organizational pride.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 324 questionnaires were collected from the hospitality industry of Pakistan.

Findings

The results of this research revealed that dimensions of CSR (external and internal) have a positive influence on organizational pride. Also, organizational pride is found as an underlying mediating mechanism between the relationship of CSR and OCBE. The results also indicated that a higher level of POS strengthens the relationship between CSR and organizational pride.

Practical implications

The findings are limited to only hospitality industry. Organizations can enhance employees’ sense of pride through CSR activities, which subsequently enhance employees OCBE. The findings also suggested that organizational pride contains intrinsic motivation that can help employees to enhance their OCBE.

Originality/value

This research suggests that organizational pride and POS are important factors which influence the relationship between CSR and OCBE. Further, it also empirically tests this model in a developing country context.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Sabrina Verena Helm, Uwe Renk and Anubha Mishra

The purpose of this paper is to identify how employees’ perceived congruity of their employers’ corporate brand with their own actual and ideal self may affect their brand…

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4332

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how employees’ perceived congruity of their employers’ corporate brand with their own actual and ideal self may affect their brand identification (BI), brand pride (BP) and brand citizenship behavior (BCB).

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional paper involved 283 employees in Germany who completed an online survey.

Findings

Congruity of the brand with employees’ actual self and with their ideal self has similar effects on employees’ BI. However, effects differ with respect to the other outcome variables. BP is only affected by congruity of the brand with the ideal self, whereas BCB is only affected by congruity of the brand with the actual self. Brand identity is positively related to BP and BCB; BP also affects BCB.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies could include different sources for evaluation of BI, BP and BCB; for temporally separate measurement of identification, pride and BCB; and for use of fictitious brands or experimental manipulations of pride to increase internal validity. The discrepant impacts of congruity of the brand with the actual self and the ideal self as detected in the paper could spark research interest in addressing motivations to increase self-esteem and self-consistency in a work context or in investigating specific mediators or moderators in the relationship between self-concept, (brand) identification and pride, as well as behaviors. Finally, research could address different kinds of pride, such as individual and collective forms of pride, as well as their interplay.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware of the different effects of a corporate brand’s fit with employees’ actual and ideal self, and also should note that BI seems essential in augmenting BP and brand-related behaviors. The paper develops implications for internal branding and HRM strategies regarding employee selection, promotion and retention. Findings also indicate that BP motivates BCB in line with current assumptions in research and practice on individual forms of pride.

Originality/value

This paper investigates employees’ perceptions of “their” brand’s fit with their actual and ideal self separately, and determines the differences in impact on BP and BCB, extending existing knowledge on drivers of brand-building behaviors. It also develops the concept of BP in the context of social identity theory and the need for distinction; it further provides initial empirical insights into the role of employees’ BP, including the development of a measure.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Gianfranco Walsh, Jason J. Dahling, Mario Schaarschmidt and Simon Brach

Service firms increasingly hire employees that work two or more jobs. Drawing on conservation of resources (COR) theory and the notion that employees have finite emotional

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1050

Abstract

Purpose

Service firms increasingly hire employees that work two or more jobs. Drawing on conservation of resources (COR) theory and the notion that employees have finite emotional resources, the purpose of this paper is to examine the consequences of emotional labour among employees who simultaneously work in two service jobs. The authors posit that emotional labour requirements from the primary job (PJ) and secondary job (SJ) interact to emotionally exhaust employees through a process of resource depletion. Specifically, building on extant work, this research tests a theoretical mediation model of surface acting predicting organizational commitment through emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a predictive survey approach, 171 frontline-service employees with two jobs from a variety of service industries are surveyed in two waves. The hypothesized model is tested using a bootstrap procedure for testing indirect effects. In addition, the authors investigate first- and second-stage moderation.

Findings

Results confirm full mediation of the relationship between surface acting and organizational commitment by emotional exhaustion, confirming that the effect of surface acting on organizational commitment is indirect through emotional exhaustion. In addition, results reveal that surface acting in the SJ moderates the link between surface acting in the PJ and emotional exhaustion, and that employees low on organizational identification congruence display lower levels of organizational commitment with the PJ.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the literature that relates emotional labour to organizational commitment by investigating contingent factors. The key contribution thus pertains to identifying contingent factors based in COR theory and social identity theory that influence the triadic relation between surface acting, emotional exhaustion, and organizational commitment.

Practical implications

Results reveal that surface acting in a second job not just simply adds to the level of employee emotional exhaustion. Instead levels of surface acting in a first and second job interact with each other to affect emotional exhaustion. This finding suggests service managers must take into account if and how employees are enforced to perform surface acting in the other job to prevent high exhaustion.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate emotional labour among dual job holders, a growing segment of the service workforce that poses unique challenges to organizations.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Evans Asante Boadi, Zheng He, Eric Kofi Boadi, Josephine Bosompem and Philip Avornyo

The purpose of this paper is to draw on affect social exchange theory and related literature to develop and test a research model linking employees’ perception of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on affect social exchange theory and related literature to develop and test a research model linking employees’ perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) to their outcomes [performance and organisational pride (ORP)] with moderating variables: perceived work motivation patterns (autonomous and controlled motivation) to sustain firm’s operations through their employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used Ghana as a case for this study due to recent turbulences in the banking sector of Ghana. A sample data of 244 subordinate/supervisor dyads from rural and community banks was collected with a time-lagged technique and analysed through a structural equation modelling for this study.

Findings

These employee’s perceptions of CSR positively related to their performance and ORP. Autonomous motivated employees had a stronger positive moderated impact on perceived CSR-Performance link whereas controlled motivated employees recorded a stronger impact on perceived CSR-ORP link.

Practical implications

Based on these results, managers and human resource (HR) professionals can aim at acquiring favourable employees’ perception of their firms’ CSR initiatives. In that, it can help firms to remain in business particularly in difficult times. Also, autonomous and controlled motivators may seem inversely related, however, they are not contradictory to each other. Both can coexist within a firm and it is crucial that HR professionals and managers endeavour to balance them discreetly to attain organisational goals.

Originality/value

Despite the growing interest in CSR across continents, CSR outcomes on employees among small and medium scale firms especially in Africa has fairly been toned-down by respective management of firms, governments and researchers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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