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Article

Cristiano A.B. Castro, Felipe Zambaldi and Mateus Canniatti Ponchio

This paper aims to conceptualize two dimensions of active innovation resistance (AIR): cognitive active resistance and emotional active resistance. A scale to measure this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conceptualize two dimensions of active innovation resistance (AIR): cognitive active resistance and emotional active resistance. A scale to measure this construct is proposed and tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted, with sample sizes of 195, 190 and 186, to test the discriminant, convergent, nomological and criterion validity of the proposed AIRc+e scale and to analyze its explanatory and predictive power. Data were gathered using the online platform of a US-based research company.

Findings

The authors provide evidence that AIR is a two-dimension construct comprising a cognitive and an emotional dimension. AIR was modeled as a third-order construct, comprising two second-order constructs, cognitive active resistance and emotional active resistance. The impact of adding an emotion dimension to active resistance was therefore assessed, and the results indicated that the explanatory and predictive power of the AIR measure improved as expected.

Practical implications

Consumers are most likely to resist innovations launched onto the marketplace, either prior to or after evaluating them. A better understanding of the reasons behind their resistance to innovation, as well as of its mechanisms, is of great importance in decreasing an innovation’s chances of failure.

Originality/value

This study proposes that incorporating emotion into the assessment of AIR will result in a deeper understanding of adoption and rejection behavior, expanding the current knowledge of consumer behavior in innovation-related, new product adoption and decisions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article

Zhenduo Zhang, Huan Xiao, Xueqin Gou, Miaomiao Li and Junwei Zheng

Previous research has examined the effects of discrete affects on voice; however, the role of trait and state affects in voice literature has received little attention…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has examined the effects of discrete affects on voice; however, the role of trait and state affects in voice literature has received little attention. This study aims to address this important issue from a conservation of resources perspective, by exploring the influence of daily positive affect and emotional resistance to change on the voice of employees and their resulting work outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collected data about 285 daily episodes from 57 employees over five consecutive days, using an experience sampling method (ESM) through mobile surveys. The study found that emotional resistance to change was negatively related to employee voice and in-role performance.

Findings

Voice mediated the negative relationship between emotional resistance to change and in-role performance. The study also found that daily positive affect buffered the negative effects of emotional resistance to change on voice.

Originality/value

These findings extend the research concerning affect and voice; the study provides integrative insight into how affect dynamically influences organizations.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article

Rajiv R. Thakur and Shalini Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment in bridging the gap between resistance and readiness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment in bridging the gap between resistance and readiness to change.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model including five constructs is developed. The questionnaire survey using the study variables readiness to change, trust, perceived organizational support, emotional attachment, and resistance to change was used in this study. Descriptive statistics and mediation regression analysis are used to test all hypotheses using the survey data of 276 middle-level managers.

Findings

The findings reflect how readiness to change reduces the impact of resistance to change during organizational change. Furthermore it also finds that how trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment mediates the relationship between resistance and readiness and reduces the gap between the two.

Research limitations/implications

The findings in the study have made significant contribution to the literature especially on middle-level managers in the Indian context. There was a paucity of research done on the study variables. The mediating effects of the study variable have never been explored earlier and therefore make an immense contribution to the field of knowledge for practitioners and academicians.

Practical implications

The research results have many practical implications. It could be established that trust, perceived organizational support, and emotional attachment have a strong and positive association with the management of change. Linking of study variables during change is helpful for the top managers for better understanding during a major organizational change. Supporting the employees through human touch during change will lead to easier transition. Understanding of various dimensions that influence employee to readiness for organizational change is an important endeavor for organizational change.

Social implications

The research is of utmost significance for the top management as it can provide a better insight to understand and keep in mind the key aspects during organizational change in such a way that chances of resistance reduces to minimal. If the employees are contented by receiving support from their bosses, if there exists a mutual trust which increases emotional attachment, introducing change in the organization will be much easier for the management.

Originality/value

This research attempts to investigate how during times of turbulent change in an organization trust between the employees and their supervisor, perceived social support, and emotional attachment with the organization positively impact the change management process. The findings provide valuable insights for the top management to understand the psyche of its employees and provide them a human touch during the time of organizational change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

Alessandra Rosa

On December 14, 2010, University of Puerto Rico (UPR) student activists initiated the second wave of their strike at a disadvantage. The presence of the police force…

Abstract

Purpose

On December 14, 2010, University of Puerto Rico (UPR) student activists initiated the second wave of their strike at a disadvantage. The presence of the police force inside the campus raised the stakes for the student movement. No longer did student activists have the “legal rights” or control of the university as a physical public space to hold their assemblies and coordinate their different events. As a result, student activists had to improvise and (re)construct their spaces of resistance by using emotional narratives, organizing non-violent civil disobedience acts at public places, fomenting lobbying groups, disseminating online petitions, and developing alternative proposals to the compulsory fee. This second wave continued until March 2011, when it came to a halt after an incident that involved physical harassment to the Chancellor, Ana Guadalupe, during one of the student demonstrations. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on Ron Eyerman’s (2005, p. 53) analysis on “the role of emotions in social movements with the aid of performance theory,” the author center this paper on examining student activists’ tactics and strategies in the development and maintenance of their emotional narratives and internet activism. By adapting Joshua Atkinson’s (2010) concept of resistance performance, the author argues that student activists’ resistance performances assisted them in (re)framing their collective identities by (re)constructing spaces of resistance and contention while immersed in violent confrontations with the police.

Findings

Ever since the establishment of the university as an institution, student activism has played a key role in shaping the political policies and history of many countries; “today, student actions continue to have direct effects on educational institutions and on national and international politics” (Edelman, 2001, p. 3). Consequently, and especially in times of economic and political crisis, student activism has occupied and constructed spaces of resistance and contention to protest and reveal the existing repressions of neoliberal governments serving as a (re)emergence of an international social movement to guarantee the accessibility to a public higher education of excellence. Thus, it is important to remember that the 2010-2011 UPR student activism’s success should not be measured by the sum of demands granted, but rather by the sense of community achieved and the establishment of social networks that have continued to create resistance and change in the island.

Originality/value

As of yet there is no thorough published analysis of the 2010-2011 UPR student strike, its implications, and how the university community currently perceives it. By elaborating on the concept of resistance performance, the author’s study illustrates how both traditional and alternative media (re)presentations of student activism can develop, maintain, adjust, or change the students’ collective identity(ies). The author’s work not only makes Puerto Rico visible in the research concerning social movements, student activism, and internet activism; in addition, it provides resistance performance as a concept to describe various degrees of participation in current social movements.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 36 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Fayçal Boukamcha

This paper aims to clarify the effect of attitudinal ambivalence on resistance to anti-smoking persuasion through information processing styles. It was hypothesized that a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the effect of attitudinal ambivalence on resistance to anti-smoking persuasion through information processing styles. It was hypothesized that a high smoker’s ambivalence, induced by an anti-smoking persuasive message, triggers among smokers both a reflective and a non-reflective information processing. In turn, both the information processing styles were supposed to be predictors of the resistance to anti-smoking persuasion.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment and a survey were conducted on a random sample of 347 smokers in this regard.

Findings

The findings indicated that smokers feel ambivalent toward anti-smoking messages in print ads and tend to process them both analytically and superficially. Also, it seems that only the analytical processing triggers resistance to anti-smoking persuasion.

Originality/value

The author reports on the importance of attitudinal ambivalence and information processing in the resistance to anti-smoking persuasion process. The paper should be of interest to readers in the areas of health communication and social marketing. This work seems to be important to the extent that few works have highlighted the causal and linear effect of a persuasive anti-smoking message on smokers’ ambivalence, information processing and resistance to persuasion. The findings in this paper seem interesting insofar, as they show the importance of the negative emotional appeal in the ambivalence, analytical information processing and resistance triggering.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Book part

Shelley Zion, Adam York and Dane Stickney

In the 30 years since Giroux (1983) named schools as a site of resistance, little has happened to sustain and embed that practice in schools. The contexts, structures, and…

Abstract

In the 30 years since Giroux (1983) named schools as a site of resistance, little has happened to sustain and embed that practice in schools. The contexts, structures, and policies in schools do not foster opportunities for resistance, and schools of education do not prepare teachers to support students’ critical actions in schools, ensuring the reproduction of inequity and injustice. While this is true for all historically marginalized groups, the specific legacy of discrimination (i.e., threats of deportation) faced by Latinx students and communities in the western United States often serves to silence their voices and efforts at resistance (Darder, Noguera, Fuentes, & Sanchez, 2012). In this chapter, we examine data from a student voice research project, including weekly observations (n = 102) for the school year across three public school classrooms, teacher reflections, and student work. This work is framed by the theory of sociopolitical development, implicating both teachers and students in the process of resistance and liberation. The data we explore captures (1) early conversations between students and teachers about issues of racial and economic injustice, (2) the initial resistance of students to having those conversations, (3) increasing trust between teachers and students supporting engagement with the issues, (4) students’ active resistance toward the issues that impacted them, (5) teachers and students working together to challenge unjust policies – at the school, district, and state level.

Details

The Power of Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-462-6

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Article

Cristela Maia Bairrada, Arnaldo Coelho and Viktoriya Lizanets

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the influences of brand personality on consumer behavior, with a special emphasis on the brand love construct. The aim is to expand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the influences of brand personality on consumer behavior, with a special emphasis on the brand love construct. The aim is to expand upon existing literature in the field of branding, investigating the relationship between brand love and brand personality through experiential approaches to consumer behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model and the analysis of related hypotheses were based on a sample of 478 Portuguese clothing brand consumers. The data were collected using an online survey and the data analysis was done using the structural equations modeling.

Findings

The results show that brand personality has a positive and significant impact on brand love, resistance to negative information and self-disclosure and brand love has a positive and significant impact on brand loyalty, word-of-mouth, resistance to negative information, willingness to pay more, self-disclosure and active engagement.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some methodological limitation affecting its potential contributions. This investigation has a cross-sectional nature and only tested a few variables as consequences of brand personality.

Practical implications

This investigation provides evidence of the major impacts of both brand personality and brand love, showing how they combine to boost relevant outcomes like brand loyalty, WOW, willingness to pay more, resistance to negative information, self-disclosure or active engagement.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is related to three fundamental aspects: it is the first time the relationship between brand personality and brand love is tested using second-order modeling to capture the combined effects of all dimensions of brand personality; the influence of brand personality is usually related to attitudes (e.g. word-of-mouth, willingness to pay more, etc.) and not with feelings, such as love, the most powerful feeling that can be established between two people or between a person and a brand (in the case of brand love); and the authors tested brand love by linking brand personality and some traditional relational outcomes under the assumption that brand love can strengthen such relationships.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Athanasios G. Patsiotis, Tim Hughes and Don J. Webber

This study examines internet banking adoption and resistance behaviour in Greece in order to develop profiles of adopters and non‐adopters of the service. The aim is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines internet banking adoption and resistance behaviour in Greece in order to develop profiles of adopters and non‐adopters of the service. The aim is to illustrate customers' resistance behaviour towards internet banking. The existing research does not explain resistance behaviour, since it does not clearly distinguish non‐adoption from resistance. Consequently, it has not recognised the different types of non‐adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

A measuring instrument was developed and utilised in a survey of a convenience sample of 1,200 customers. The derived dimensionality of the relevant perceptual variables was used to explore the existence of different customer segments through cluster analysis.

Findings

Three segments were identified, where the description of their profiles is based on customer perceptions of the service and general usage data. Across these segments adopters and non‐adopters were found to have different characteristics. With regard to demographics, only income was found to be associated with segment membership.

Research limitations/implications

Perceptual and usage variables are useful in market segmentation. The results also suggest the possible existence of sub‐groups within each segment characterised by different aspects of resistance behaviour. Further research could identify and explore their potential and study non‐adopter behaviour.

Practical implications

Service providers should target users and non‐users across the segments differently. While the users identified require different retention policies, the resistance or non‐resistance observed in non‐users suggest the proper management of delay and rejection behaviours.

Originality/value

The customer segments identified in this study are based on new links found between the factors that drive diffusion and resistance to diffusion and general usage data. Non‐adopters across the segments resist for different reasons, or not resist.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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