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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Lloyd C. Harris and Emmanuel Ogbonna

The aim of this article is to supply grounded empirical insights into the forms of negative word‐of‐mouth by front‐line, customer contact employees.

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4188

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to supply grounded empirical insights into the forms of negative word‐of‐mouth by front‐line, customer contact employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The article adopts a qualitative approach through interviews with 54 front‐line employees in three retail organizations: food, clothing and electronic goods.

Findings

The paper finds four different forms of negative word‐of‐mouth behaviours which are labelled customer‐oriented, anti‐management/firm, employee‐oriented and anti‐competitor word‐of‐mouth. The paper shows how each of these behaviours varied in terms of the target audience (the intended listeners), the focus of attention (the focal point of comments), the motivation (the perceived rationale for the behaviour) and the extent to which employees perceived their own comments to be truthful.

Research limitations/implications

The article calls for an expansion of research horizon to incorporate a fuller understanding of the dynamics of employee (mis)behaviour in the workplace in relation to resistance, subjectivity, instrumentality and clandestine control of certain aspects of workplace dynamics.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should be concerned with front‐line employee negative word‐of‐mouth especially because some of the examples which were uncovered are potentially damaging to both financial and non financial performance measures.

Originality/value

The article contributes insights into the neglected area of employee negative word‐of‐mouth. The article argues that the identification of the forms of employee negative word‐of‐mouth is an important step towards developing a theory of employee negative word‐of‐mouth that is especially pertinent to front‐line service work. The article develops a series of propositions which future researchers may find useful in advancing research in this area.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Emmanuel Ogbonna and Mike Noon

In Britain, welfare‐to‐work has been hailed as a radical initiative to help those that are socially and economically disadvantaged in society. The New Deal promises to…

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1162

Abstract

In Britain, welfare‐to‐work has been hailed as a radical initiative to help those that are socially and economically disadvantaged in society. The New Deal promises to offer young long term unemployed people the opportunity to train and experience the world of work in a bid to make them more attractive to employers. It is especially pertinent to ethnic minorities who have been identified as having an increased tendency to be unemployed. However, the intention to help ethnic minorities has not been matched with changes to the institutional framework for the delivery of training and work experience placements. This article assesses the likely impact of the New Deal on unemployed people from ethnic minority communities. It contends that the failure of the present arrangement to cater for the needs of ethnic minorities may affect the success of the New Deal as far as ethnic minorities are concerned.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 20 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Lloyd C. Harris and Emmanuel Ogbonna

A theme emerging from research into the determinants, content and consequences of market orientation is that developing a market‐oriented culture exerts a profound…

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4162

Abstract

A theme emerging from research into the determinants, content and consequences of market orientation is that developing a market‐oriented culture exerts a profound influence on the organizational culture of a company. Explores and describes the manner and forms of front‐line employees’ responses to market‐oriented culture change initiatives. The paper begins with a brief overview of existing literature discussing the definition and components of a market orientation. Thereafter, extant research into the consequences of developing a market‐oriented culture is reviewed critically. After detailing the research design and methodology adopted in this study, the summary findings of two in‐depth case studies are presented. The findings indicate that front‐line employees respond differentially to market‐oriented culture change programmes. Concludes with a series of implications for both marketing and culture theorists and practitioners.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Emmanuel Ogbonna and Barry Wilkinson

Strategy and culture in British supermarkets aredealt with in a second article, this time from theviewpoint of the checkout. Attempts to create acustomer care ethos…

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2680

Abstract

Strategy and culture in British supermarkets are dealt with in a second article, this time from the viewpoint of the checkout. Attempts to create a customer care ethos include instilling a corporate philosophy. For checkout staff this means smiling and meaning it. The staff see it differently; compliance may mean just “putting on an act”. Their response is discussed within the broader context of internal resistance to change and market factors beyond company control.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Emmanuel Ogbonna

Retailers are facing conflicting strategic variables as they enterthe next decade; horizontal versus vertical diversification; high streetversus greenfield out‐of‐town…

Abstract

Retailers are facing conflicting strategic variables as they enter the next decade; horizontal versus vertical diversification; high street versus greenfield out‐of‐town siting; own label versus branded goods; staff cost reductions versus loyalty and commitment of service staff. This article looks at these strategic choices in the context of the UK grocery retail sector, drawing comparisons with retail banking. It concludes that the industry is likely to consolidate market share by acquisition; that overseas diversification is unlikely; that “superstore” development will slow or stop; but that stores will expand product lines, particularly in non‐food items.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Lloyd C. Harris and Emmanuel Ogbonna

The aim of this article is to contribute to extant management and internet literature through exploring the impact of human dynamics, interaction, and influence on web…

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1826

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to contribute to extant management and internet literature through exploring the impact of human dynamics, interaction, and influence on web site design, development, and implementation within the context of broader internet operations development.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the nature of the subject area under investigation and the need for both depth and rich understanding, an in‐depth, longitudinal case study approach was considered appropriate for this study.

Findings

The evaluation of the process of web site design, development, and implementation identifies six cultural gaps and numerous instances of hierarchical political influence that combined with the medium of communication to shape both the articulation and the understanding of messages.

Originality/value

This study will have significant appeal not only to management and culture theorists and practitioners, but also to those executives and academics interested in the processes and pitfalls of web site design, development, and implementation within the broader context of developing internet operations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Lloyd C. Harris and Emmanuel Ogbonna

This article demonstrates the usefulness of applying the multiperspective framework developed by Martin (1992) to the analyses of organizational culture. The paper…

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6865

Abstract

This article demonstrates the usefulness of applying the multiperspective framework developed by Martin (1992) to the analyses of organizational culture. The paper presents empirical evidence derived from the UK retail sector to illustrate that the culture of retail organizations can be more clearly understood by reference to Martin’s (1992) three perspectives. Moreover, it argues that the organizational members’ perceptions of culture correspond with their respective hierarchical positions. The paper concludes with an exploration of theoretical and practical implications derived from the application of Martin’s (1992) three‐perspective framework.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Emmanuel Ogbonna and Lloyd C. Harris

It is commonly argued that the exponential growth in the application of internet technology is one of the most important recent developments in business and management…

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1557

Abstract

Purpose

It is commonly argued that the exponential growth in the application of internet technology is one of the most important recent developments in business and management. However, although much research has been conducted on the strategic and operational aspects of the internet, there is a surprising dearth of research on the organizational cultural dynamics of this technological innovation. The purpose of this study is to examine the implications of introducing an internet‐led strategy on organizational culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Specifically, the study explores the attempts by management to exploit the introduction of internet operations as a catalyst to transform the culture of the organization.

Findings

It is argued that although a number of factors (such as organizational centrality and senior management patronage) increased the profile of the Internet Operations Unit, the attempt by this unit to dominate subcultural dynamics was met with difficulties, dissenting voices and issues that were not wholly consistent with the wishes of senior management.

Originality/value

The paper offers insight into the emergent subcultures and the attempts of their members to increase their visibility and influence within the organization as a whole.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

Emmanuel Ogbonna and Barry Wilkinson

Strategy and Culture Corporate strategy refers basically to a firm's relationships with its environment, its main objectives and its means of accomplishing them. Corporate…

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2796

Abstract

Strategy and Culture Corporate strategy refers basically to a firm's relationships with its environment, its main objectives and its means of accomplishing them. Corporate culture, on the other hand, is a nebulous concept with almost as many definitions as there are “experts” on the subject. The working definition for this article is derived from anthropologist Clyde Kluckhohn, who defined culture as “the set of habitual and traditional ways of thinking, feeling, and reacting that are characteristic of the ways a particular society meets its problems at a particular point in time”. Our working definition of corporate culture substitutes the word “organisation” for “society”.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Pawan Budhwar, Andy Crane, Annette Davies, Rick Delbridge, Tim Edwards, Mahmoud Ezzamel, Lloyd Harris, Emmanuel Ogbonna and Robyn Thomas

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their…

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34098

Abstract

Wonders whether companies actually have employees best interests at heart across physical, mental and spiritual spheres. Posits that most organizations ignore their workforce – not even, in many cases, describing workers as assets! Describes many studies to back up this claim in theis work based on the 2002 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference, in Cardiff, Wales.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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